Definition of trug in English:

trug

(also trug basket)

noun

British
  • A shallow oblong basket made of strips of wood, traditionally used for carrying garden flowers and produce.

    • ‘Oak-spallers and trug makers - who make baskets - along with hayrakers, walking stick-makers and millwrights are among the craftsmen considered at risk of dying out.’
    • ‘Armed with a wicker trug and the very brilliant bible for the county's foodies - I head off to the organic superstore.’
    • ‘Once the bin was gone I simply removed everything from the bed, putting any plants I wanted to keep in a water-filled trug.’
    • ‘If these tirades are accompanied by an overflowing trug of produce they can be more acceptable and allow the recipient to discover whether the claims of superior taste are in fact true.’
    • ‘The East Sussex-based company has been selling trugs - rustic carrying baskets made from sweet chestnut and willow - since 1899.’
    • ‘Could Jasper Conran compost, trugs and trellises be the next big thing?’
    • ‘The town has another curiosity - the farm shop, which has ballooned into Britain's poshest supermarket, complete with wicker trugs instead of shopping trolleys and quails' eggs by the dozen.’
    • ‘Lay boughs and cones in a trug, and tie a plaid ribbon on the handle.’
    • ‘He advocates the use of ‘old terracotta pots, seedboxes, baskets or wooden trugs, which look as if they might have come straight from the potting shed’.’
    • ‘I'm now the proud owner of a Heligan fleece, a little trug and some seeds.’
    • ‘A present that I have used gratefully for years is a real Sussex trug.’
    • ‘Maybe if I can just squeeze in there I might be able to find a spare key under a watering can, inside a trug or, maybe, next to a dibber…’
    • ‘However, I always love to receive gardening gadgets; so if your mother is a fanatical gardener you could get her a new trowel, some copper plant labels, a trug to stash cut flowers in, a plant pot or a twine dispenser.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a basin): perhaps a dialect variant of trough.

Pronunciation:

trug

/trəɡ/