Main definitions of truckle in English

: truckle1truckle2

truckle1

noun

  • A small barrel-shaped cheese, especially Cheddar.

    • ‘Each truckle of cheese is covered in a wax coating.’
    • ‘Plenty of crusty bread and a big salad with a simplified cheese board, such as a whole Brie and a small truckle of Cheddar, will go down better than a pudding.’
    • ‘The gentleman in front of her announced that he had come to collect a cheddar - a whole truckle and they are big!’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a wheel or pulley): from Anglo-Norman French trocle, from Latin trochlea ‘sheaf of a pulley’. The current sense dates from the early 19th century and was originally dialect.

Pronunciation

truckle

/ˈtrəkəl//ˈtrəkəl/

Main definitions of truckle in English

: truckle1truckle2

truckle2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Submit or behave obsequiously.

    ‘he will neither bow nor truckled to any kind of control’
    ‘they truckled to the leaders of the trade union movement’
    • ‘Sometimes they indulge false hopes that by lying low, truckling, appeasing, they can avoid danger and strife… And this is what seems to have happened in Spain.’
    • ‘Its members were accused of exceeding their powers, of truckling to the foreigners, and even of treachery.’
    • ‘He himself chose not to run for re-election to the party in 1907, and he expressed the concern that ‘some of its leaders are becoming cowardly and truckling to priests and politicians.’’
    • ‘Doll Conovan reliably slips backs into Dix's life every time he's released from jail, but he barely acknowledges her existence even when she shares his apartment and caters to his every whim obsequiously truckling, ‘Yeah!’’
    • ‘Not, he notes, ‘that there isn't plenty of truckling to superiors, parasitism, heavy-handed flattery, back-scratching and bottom-kissing, all calculated to bring special advantages to its purveyors.’’
    • ‘But the confused combination of ‘respect’ for, fear of, contempt for and truckling to the community was not governed by electoral considerations alone.’
    kowtow, submit, defer, yield, bend the knee, bow and scrape, make up, be obsequious, pander, toady, prostrate oneself, grovel
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 17th century: figuratively, from truckle bed; an earlier use of the verb was in the sense sleep in a truckle bed.

Pronunciation

truckle

/ˈtrəkəl//ˈtrəkəl/