Main definitions of truck in English

: truck1truck2

truck1

noun

  • 1A large, heavy motor vehicle used for transporting goods, materials, or troops.

    • ‘Along the road was a steady stream of trucks and lorries, piled high with belongings, from bedding and clothing to cement mixers and furniture.’
    • ‘Since yesterday, we have seen a fair bit of traffic on the roads here and lorries and trucks carrying food, water, medicines.’
    • ‘This capability would reduce the number of trucks and troops traveling on the roads in all theaters of operations.’
    • ‘Because this road is used by so many commercial vehicles, many trucks pass along the road each day.’
    • ‘One bomb destroyed a truck carrying troops, and the other went off in a ruined church where the survivors took cover.’
    • ‘The highway roads carry cars and trucks from the suburbs into the city.’
    • ‘The MoD has ordered 348 tanker trucks to carry fuel and water along roads to frontline troops.’
    • ‘You may even see your property taxes increase as towns have to pay more to keep their police cars, fire engines, and garbage trucks on the road.’
    • ‘Travelling by a separate route, a customised lorry, truck and trailer carry all our supplies, including 3,000 litres of water and a ton each of horse feed and firewood.’
    • ‘On the right side of the road was a truck tipped over that was carrying soda.’
    • ‘Wide-bodied vehicles such as trucks, occupy the full lane while moving, whereas smaller, two- or three-wheel vehicles can travel side by side in one lane.’
    • ‘Beyond the slip road was a vast junction of roads where cars and trucks hurtled along totally oblivious to our presence.’
    • ‘The community will simply not accept twice the number of trucks on the roads so we need a strategy to deal with the problem.’
    • ‘The ban aims to regulate the movements of trucks and vans on major roads, while designating alternative truck routes.’
    • ‘Share the road safely with large trucks and commercial vehicles.’
    • ‘A waste disposal lorry and a pick-up truck crashed on a narrow bridge, blocking a main road.’
    • ‘On Sunday the pallets were loaded on to a convoy of lorries, trucks and vans and taken to Stansted Airport near London where they were transferred to a plane bound for Sri Lanka.’
    • ‘We expected to see great convoys of lorries and trucks emblazoned with UN initials juddering down the coastal road bearing relief and building materials.’
    • ‘Thousands of lorries and trucks are being forced into provincial towns for rest stops and catering services, defeating the purpose of bypassing towns in the first place.’
    • ‘The absence of the late night trucks and lorries will be a blessing for many.’
    lorry, articulated lorry, heavy goods vehicle, juggernaut
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British A railroad vehicle for carrying freight, especially a small open one.
      • ‘The locomotive and six trucks are lying alongside the tracks after crashing into boulders on the line.’
      • ‘The bags were later loaded onto railway trucks and pulled by two teams of Clydesdale horses nearly six kilometres to the Stenhouse Bay jetty for loading into the waiting ships.’
      • ‘From here the visitors were taken outside to the railway siding where railway trucks would deliver the raw materials and despatch the completed wireless telegraphy equipment.’
      • ‘The second piece was considerably smaller, an L-shaped piece of steel which wooden boards would have slotted into to make the bottom and side of a railway truck.’
      • ‘The four trucks derailed at 11.15 am when a locomotive was shunting 29 trucks backwards in preparation to leave for Johannesburg later.’
      • ‘The plaintiff, who was on the defendants land as a licensee, was injured by the negligent shunting of railway trucks.’
      • ‘When I was a kid straight out of high school, I went to work for a large supply house unloading trucks and boxcars.’
      • ‘In some European countries, if coal is transported in open railway trucks the top is sprayed with a solution of lime.’
      • ‘The boxes are given to families many of whom are living in appalling conditions such as old railway trucks, buildings partly destroyed by shellfire and in extreme cases, sewers.’
      • ‘Graduating from high school in 1956, I went to work unloading freight from trucks and boxcars for $40 a week.’
    2. 1.2 A low flat-topped cart used for moving heavy items.
      • ‘Here we discuss an accident that occurred in a warehouse due to the negligence of a forklift truck driver.’
      • ‘Your job as a forklift truck operator would be to load and unload goods deliveries, and move them to and from storage areas in a warehouse or depot.’
      • ‘We offer a range of warehouse equipment, including reach trucks, stackers, powered pallet trucks, order pickers and turret trucks.’
  • 2An undercarriage with four to six wheels pivoted beneath the end of a railroad car.

    • ‘Roller bearings were specified for the engine truck for reliability and ease of maintenance, and likewise a mechanical lubricator.’
    • ‘Later versions used ‘bogies’ or special trucks in place of tires.’
    • ‘This car rides on a set of trucks built by the ERRS.’
    • ‘It was discouraging to find that even in the lightweight era a set of trucks weighed nearly 10 tons each and equaled one-third of the car's total weight.’
    • ‘They are 132 feet long and ride on three, four-wheel trucks.’
    • ‘This system uses specially reinforced and equipped highway trailers and ‘bogies’, or special trucks.’
    • ‘A bogie is a British railway term for a wheeled truck or frame under a long carriage or engine that can swivel to help the vehicle around curves.’
    • ‘He has a line on a set of trucks - the wheels and suspension that a railcar rides on - that would fit his car.’
    1. 2.1 Each of two axle units on a skateboard, to which the wheels are attached.
      • ‘The axle of the truck is a rod the goes from one end of the hangar to the other and sticks out on both sides.’
      • ‘I ride for Seek skateboards, Nike, Venture trucks, Gold wheels, and Traffic clothing.’
      • ‘Then Luke built our four-man skateboard by putting trucks on the bottom of a plank of plywood.’
  • 3A wooden disk at the top of a ship's mast or flagstaff, with sheaves for signal halyards.

    • ‘First, the sheaves at the masthead truck will need to be replaced because they're wire-sized and the new rope halyard will have a larger diameter.’
    • ‘The ensign is flown from the peak or truck of the mast, except when directed to be flown at hair-mast.’
    • ‘The main lifting halyard uses a single revolving truck/pulley, while the yard arm and gaff halyards are suspended by marine grade stainless steel pulleys.’

verb

North American
  • 1with object and adverbial of direction Convey by truck.

    ‘the food was trucked to St. Petersburg’
    ‘industries such as trucking’
    • ‘So why can't trucking companies find enough truckers?’
    • ‘The first independent initiative required is an immediate bombing pause so food can be trucked in and delivered to the people.’
    • ‘Expect to see higher prices on everything from food to clothing as trucking companies, railroads, and air transport companies pass on their increased cost of doing business.’
    • ‘At the same time, port officials say they are short-handed when it comes to unloading containers, and others involved in shipping say rail lines and trucking companies are also overextended.’
    • ‘Many refugees have become economically successful - they dominate Pakistan's trucking industry and have become prominent money-changers in the region.’
    • ‘That means digging through the donated bins of marginal fruit to salvage plums or kiwis or oranges or broccoli, packing them in little bags, trucking them back for the people who can't afford fresh produce.’
    • ‘The sub-assemblies are done by suppliers in the logistics pre-assembly plant and the finished modules are trucked to the assembly facility.’
    • ‘Areas where psychologists can aid government include better trucking security and X-ray inspection of luggage and improved communication among agencies in emergencies.’
    • ‘In keeping with his relatively conservative economic philosophy, he deregulated the airline and trucking industries and took steps to decontrol the prices of natural gas and oil.’
    • ‘Instead of making the ales at its own brewery in California and then impacting the environment by trucking them across the country, he says the company taps into unused capacity at three existing facilities.’
    • ‘If he/she now has to expend the cost of trucking the merchandise to an auction hall and preparing it for auction, that means added costs for labor, and a delay on the return on the initial investment.’
    • ‘That is taking a heavy toll on truckers and trucking companies.’
    • ‘The heavy trucking industry has shown a lot of interest in the process.’
    • ‘Employment in transportation, particularly the hard-hit airline and trucking industries, fell by 32,000 jobs.’
    • ‘The 1,000 Truck Campaign has enlisted the support of the commercial trucking industry to transform big rigs into rolling billboards for the Corps.’
    • ‘Traditionally this product is trucked to landfills or incinerated.’
    • ‘Prior to deregulation, trucking companies relied in large part on the owner-operators' ability to locate customers.’
    • ‘Wireless usage is highest among trucking companies.’
    • ‘Things have to be trucked around; services don't to nearly the same extent.’
    • ‘A spokesperson from the Tasmanian trucking industry said members could not cope with the increased demand, while a federal study showed transport costs would jump 17%.’
    1. 1.1no object Drive a truck.
      • ‘He later moved to Winnipeg where he trucked for Allied Van Lines for 36 years, travelling most of North America.’
      • ‘He trucked for many years, hauling livestock and grain.’
    2. 1.2informal no object , with adverbial of direction Go or proceed in a casual or leisurely way.
      ‘he walked confidently behind them and trucked on through!’
      • ‘We trucked on through, and made it back....but it was not a pretty sight.’
      • ‘He trucked on through the grass to the fans lining the sides and made sure that each person that wanted a picture or an autograph got one.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting a solid wooden wheel): perhaps short for truckle in the sense ‘wheel, pulley’. The sense ‘wheeled vehicle’ dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation

truck

/trək//trək/

Main definitions of truck in English

: truck1truck2

truck2

noun

  • 1archaic Barter.

    • ‘There was little currency available so that payment in kind, barter and truck were widespread.’
    • ‘Following Adam Smith, humans have a natural tendency to barter, truck, and trade.’
    • ‘The urge to barter and truck was strong enough to push goods over two thousand miles.’
    1. 1.1historical The payment of workers in kind or with vouchers rather than money.
      • ‘The Commissioners inquired into the truck system and how it applied to mining, and collected information on the arrestment of wages, which was considered just as injurious to the working-class in Scotland.’
      • ‘Following a petition of some west-country weavers, an Act was passed in 1702 forbidding the payment of wages in truck.’
      • ‘Payment of wages in "truck" was abolished.’
  • 2archaic Small wares.

    1. 2.1informal Odds and ends.
  • 3North American Market-garden produce, especially vegetables.

    as modifier ‘a truck garden’
    • ‘Later they tried organic truck crop production on the Frey farm, but this was difficult, being so far from urban areas.’
    • ‘Though he lives within the city limits of Longview, he has seven or eight acres of land on which he grows truck garden crops.’
    • ‘There are fruit trees and a little truck garden.’
    • ‘Farmers sold vegetables from their truck gardens at harvest time.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Barter or exchange.

    • ‘Usually it is the male members of the family who walk or transport the buffaloes into Bolu; it is men who purchase and who truck, barter and exchange the buffaloes.’

Phrases

  • have (or want) no truck with

    • Avoid or wish to avoid dealings or being associated with.

      ‘we have no truck with that style of gutter journalism’
      • ‘The junior minister had only just been telling us that she was having no truck with those that would claim ignorance at this stage of the game.’
      • ‘It suggests that speedy determination is something that future generations may not thank us for, and something that more thoughtful, mainstream architects should have no truck with.’
      • ‘This means, among other things, having no truck with market research, PR companies, management consultants, etc.’
      • ‘He said: ‘We have no truck with anyone who supports violence.’’
      • ‘The landlord has strict ideas about customer conduct and will likely have no truck with jugglers or squads of students handing out flyers.’
      • ‘I have no truck with anyone who uses violence, death or destruction to advance their position.’
      • ‘And this is why most sensible men will have no truck with such foolishness.’
      • ‘Personally I would have no truck with the armed tradition.’
      • ‘Obviously society should have no truck with vexatious or spurious claims, but when people suffer damage to their lives or to their careers it is only equitable that they should be awarded adequate compensation.’
      • ‘Teenagers, especially, have no truck with things joyful.’
      dealings, association, contact, communication, connection, relations, intercourse
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): probably from Old French, of unknown origin; compare with medieval Latin trocare.

Pronunciation

truck

/trək//trək/