Definition of trouper in English:

trouper

noun

  • 1An actor or other entertainer, typically one with long experience.

    • ‘‘You'd think after all these years we'd all be troupers,’ said Davis.’
    • ‘But Rona the trouper quickly moved on, wheezing her way into the audience's affections.’
    • ‘During the 1980s and '90s he wrote many songs and formed many bands to play them, touring like a trouper nationally and internationally.’
    • ‘While these super troupers keep on plucking, we are left to look for a new generation of stars to usurp them.’
    • ‘But, being a trouper, she drove out of LA with a guitar and a box of records, and did a one-woman ‘tour’, playing at locations of opportunity for a couple of weeks.’
    • ‘A real trouper puts on the sort of show his admirers expect.’
    • ‘Well, she's a trouper through and through, that's for sure.’
    • ‘‘So Richard, the trouper that he is, hit the stage to a rapturous applause of appreciation, gave a marvellous opening speech and saved the day gloriously,’ said Mr Simpson.’
    • ‘Irving and Ethel were two of a kind, indefatigable troupers who simply never wanted to get off stage.’
    • ‘This last pursuit had him touring America in a state of health that would have most troupers languishing in bed with a port and lemon and it was effectively the death of him.’
    • ‘To help him reminisce, he is joined by troupers from that period: Ken Dodd, Roy Hudd, Sheila Tracy and Anthony Horowitz.’
    • ‘Like an old trouper who cannot resist the limelight, he flounced out of a special parade of champions, saying he could not support sport as long as there were drug cover-ups going on.’
    • ‘After the circus troupers leave, clown-mime Manuel stays on, moving into a nearby shack, befriending Willem and teaching him magic and clown arts.’
    • ‘In this photograph, Kerry bears an odd resemblance to an ageing Beach Boy, another old trouper who promises good vibrations.’
    • ‘But you've never seen a trouper like this before.’
    • ‘The Thai performers are experienced troupers who know how to lip-sync to Chinese songs and they would go downstage to mingle with the audience, such as sitting down on the laps of the male audience members.’
    • ‘She rambled into unscripted anecdotes, and there were tons of references to American icons and Hollywood chums I'd never heard of, but a true trouper captivates no matter what.’
    • ‘I suspect they are troupers who will be perfect wherever and whenever they play.’
    • ‘These girls are not fiercely independent rock rebels; they are well-behaved showbiz troupers from the tightly controlled world of manufactured pop.’
    • ‘Next came juvenile acts like the Gumm Sisters, whose youngest member later changed her name to Judy Garland, and the Nicholas Brothers, dancing troupers who subsequently became headliners.’
    entertainer, performer, showman, artist
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A reliable and uncomplaining person.
      ‘a real trouper, Ma concealed her troubles’
      • ‘Bridget says that her son is a real trouper, but his success, she hopes, will reassure any parent whose child is diagnosed as a diabetic.’
      • ‘She is - loyal trouper - solidly behind him, more interested, apparently, in setting the historical record straight than concerned about her own very public humiliation.’
      • ‘But he's a trouper, and I hope everything will work out.’
      • ‘And the more open you are with kids, I think the more reassured they are, and they were really troupers.’
      • ‘She's a trouper, though, and is happy to do the interview between glugs. ‘This is a very good environment to be creative in,’ she says.’
      • ‘Denise, who is playing the wicked queen, said: ‘I take my crown off to her she is a real trouper.’’
      • ‘She was a trouper and just got on with it and helped set the tone.’
      • ‘She's been on her own for the best part of 20 years since my dad died, but she's always a trouper.’
      • ‘I admire your fortitude, but there's a fine line between being a trouper and recklessness.’
      • ‘She's such a trouper that even when suffering from the flu she'll just pop a couple of Asprin and soldier on.’
      • ‘But one of Bobby's colleagues points out what a trouper he was.’
      • ‘But he is a trouper who often ends up saving the day.’
      • ‘‘Well, your little one is a trouper,’ he offered.’
      • ‘She was really being a trouper and trying to continue.’
      • ‘Jack was a trouper and went on with us to the movie.’
      • ‘I'd recommend it to novice gardeners because it is a real trouper of a plant.’

Usage

The traditional spelling for the sense ‘a reliable and uncomplaining person’ is trouper, not trooper. More than two thirds of examples of this use in the Oxford English Corpus are spelled trooper, however, and this form has become common even in edited text. Nonetheless, trooper is still regarded by many as incorrect

Origin

1920s: from troupe + -er.

Pronunciation

trouper

/ˈtro͞opər//ˈtrupər/