Definition of trivial in English:

trivial

adjective

  • 1Of little value or importance.

    ‘huge fines were imposed for trivial offenses’
    ‘trivial details’
    • ‘Newspapers always mix the trivial with the important, for the very good reason that trivia can be entertaining.’
    • ‘Even if the case is of very little importance, involving trivial loss, seeking truth from facts shall always be the norm for action.’
    • ‘The answers might be of trivial importance now, but someday it could be lifesaving.’
    • ‘He recalls a day when they argued over a trivial script detail.’
    • ‘There are several lessons to be learned from this incident, some trivial, some quite important.’
    • ‘To our contemporary minds, that might seem a relatively trivial offense.’
    • ‘No detail is too trivial to elude the boastful commentary.’
    • ‘But it is sad that the media has been highlighting trivial events while ignoring important health issues.’
    • ‘Sorting out the important from the trivial adds to good management of matters.’
    • ‘Many people will benefit from this yet still there are some who obstruct and complain about the smallest trivial detail.’
    • ‘But, of course, the fact is that offences range from the trivial to the serious.’
    • ‘Very often qualitative studies seem to be full of apparently trivial details.’
    • ‘He handed out yellow cards for trivial offences, but ignored several dangerous tackles.’
    • ‘That suggests the possibility of anything but a trivial role for land value taxation in many of the rich countries.’
    • ‘This lack of context is unfortunate, given the amount of space devoted to a plethora of more peripheral or trivial details.’
    • ‘It does not matter that the offences are trivial or made under the immunity perhaps conferred by the Senate in the course of an inquiry.’
    • ‘A plethora of issues, both important as well as trivial, have had an effect on the public opinion.’
    • ‘And the pressure to conform to all these trivial values is absolutely enormous.’
    • ‘Possibly they see the offence as too trivial to pursue.’
    • ‘She had a light touch and a way of painting a portrait through a million trivial details that seems very contemporary.’
    unimportant, insignificant, inconsequential, minor, of little account, of no account, of little consequence, of no consequence, of little importance, of no importance, not worth bothering about, not worth mentioning
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a person) concerned only with trifling or unimportant things.
      • ‘Sometimes he presents her as a vain and trivial woman, sometimes as merely ignorant and fearful.’
      • ‘A few hecklers managed to get in during this period but they were quite trivial.’
      • ‘Mary is an amiable, conventional, and trivial young woman who gets married.’
      frivolous, superficial, shallow, unthinking, empty-headed, feather-brained, lightweight, foolish, silly
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Mathematics Denoting a subgroup that either contains only the identity element or is identical with the given group.
      • ‘The first topology is a trivial one, just stating the genes are allelically identical.’
      • ‘Next in complexity to the trivial ones are the mazes represented by trees.’
      • ‘In group theory one of the topics he studied was that of groups with only trivial automorphisms.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘belonging to the trivium’): from medieval Latin trivialis, from Latin trivium (see trivium).

Pronunciation

trivial

/ˈtrivēəl//ˈtrɪviəl/