Definition of trend in English:

trend

noun

  • 1A general direction in which something is developing or changing.

    ‘an upward trend in sales and profit margins’
    • ‘They observed differences between the samples and made note of some general trends.’
    • ‘As a general trend, sales of Irish newspapers have declined during the past quarter.’
    • ‘Returning to the pectoral limb, we can easily make out two general trends.’
    • ‘The exercise has also come about because of housing developments in the area which could affect population trends.’
    • ‘The point is that the general trend is moving in the positive direction.’
    • ‘But we expect the general trend in 2000 will be in the opposite direction to last year.’
    • ‘The most recent batch reverse that trend, generally showing the parties to be even.’
    • ‘Some trends may be apparent but other changes may occur which may contradict the general direction of the trend.’
    • ‘We know of no previous reports of angina incidence trends in Britain based on reviews of medical records from general practices.’
    • ‘Only a few years ago, in 1999 to be precise, Al used to call upward price trends a threat.’
    • ‘They also reportedly stressed the importance of such positive trends to be sustained in the weeks ahead.’
    • ‘Certainly in New South Wales, new trends are developing in terms of where foster families are in 2003.’
    • ‘The general trend is towards currency management against a basket which reflects the trading mix of imports and exports.’
    • ‘As is apparent in the current analysis, the trends were general, and not discrete.’
    • ‘The trend indicates the general tendency or direction over the long-term.’
    • ‘Any measure of geographical variation or time trends needs to ensure comparability of numerator and denominator data.’
    • ‘At any rate, there is a worrying trend developing along the North Mayo coast.’
    • ‘However, there are some general trends that depend more on the species than on the gene.’
    • ‘The revolution in English football has led to the development of some disturbing trends, however.’
    • ‘The editors followed the general trends within economic history, whose foundations were developed elsewhere.’
    tendency, movement, drift, swing, shift, course, current, run, direction, inclination, leaning
    View synonyms
  • 2A fashion.

    ‘the latest trends in modern dance’
    • ‘It's all about style and cars and fashion and trends and shape and form, so it's a great marriage.’
    • ‘I confess it is a fashionable trend, but in summer, I think most people choose cotton or silk.’
    • ‘Prices in the art market are to a high degree influenced by fashionable trends.’
    • ‘As far as retro fashion trends go, the fifties may be here to stay awhile.’
    • ‘Tiny bikini underwear is gaining in prevalence simply because of today's fashion trends.’
    • ‘For office supply stores, color and fashion trends spell opportunity and risk.’
    • ‘Fashion trends in general are strongly influenced by music, TV and film celebrities.’
    • ‘This technique serves to identify drug use trends at an early stage in their development.’
    • ‘Politicians now think that a few glib punchlines and a couple of fashionable trends will pull them closer to young people.’
    • ‘Even without a single currency, that is where we are sharing cultures, fashion and lifestyle trends.’
    • ‘These days, in contrast, fashion trends emanate from a diverse range of sources.’
    • ‘The mall promoted trends and high fashion, which were two things Rebecca didn't follow.’
    • ‘Someone had better spare me from their ramblings of fashion trends and marriage.’
    • ‘But what is the real impact on the home front of our obsession with fashionable and vogue trends?’
    • ‘The gardens of the time were eclectic and people wanted the latest trends from home and abroad - leading to some extravagant features.’
    • ‘As a matter of fact, I don't like anything to do with fashions or trends.’
    • ‘His studies have shown that fashion and social trends and even consumer buying habits often reflect humanity's search for a deeper meaning.’
    • ‘In the future, demographics may alter food trends in yet different directions.’
    • ‘And the channel that plays the hit music is now setting trends in fashion.’
    • ‘However, new electronics features as usual will ameliorate such negative trends.’
    fashion, vogue, style, mode, craze, mania, rage
    View synonyms
  • 3A topic that is the subject of many posts on a social media website within a short period of time.

    ‘for more than 20 days in a row, most of the top Twitter trends were Olympics-related’
    • ‘Trends on Twitter rarely last beyond a day.’
    • ‘The story has staked its claim amongst the trending topics, holding 8 of the 10 UK trending topic spots and 4 of the 10 worldwide trends.’
    • ‘The 29-year-old became the top Twitter trend minutes after he won the bronze.’
    • ‘Within a few hours of the match, reference to the incident was both headline news around the country and the top trend on Twitter worldwide.’
    • ‘It has an interactive map with national, state and local election results and a "social" section with Twitter and Facebook comments and trends.’
    • ‘This is the second night in a row that soaps have taken over Twitter trends.’
    • ‘This is the year end list of the best trends on Facebook in specific categories.’
    • ‘At-a-glance access to the hottest Twitter trends helps you keep up with the zeitgeist.’
    • ‘The late actor was among the top five trends on microblogging site Twitter.’
    • ‘Within an hour, her name was a Twitter trend in the United States.’
    • ‘Users can click "see more" for a full list of trends buzzing on Facebook.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Change or develop in a general direction.

    ‘unemployment has been trending upward’
    • ‘Cable modem services, with monthly fees trending upward to a rough average of $45, have proved popular and sticky in the face of all the growth pains.’
    • ‘As is commonly the case in willingness-to-accept auctions, they found that median bids were relatively high in the first bidding round and generally trended downward as the experiment progressed.’
    • ‘Like I said, the unemployment rate has trended down.’
    • ‘At that time, results for the subgroup of African Americans trended in the same direction, but were not conclusive.’
    • ‘And all the leading economic indicators are trending upward.’
    • ‘In fact, cancer rates were trending downwards in all developing countries prior to screening programmes having been initiated in the 1960s.’
    • ‘The Finance Ministry has offered an annual interest rate of 6.4 percent for its seven-year saving bonds to be issued for the 2006 fiscal year, saying general interest rates are trending higher.’
    • ‘When one looks at the figures, one can see the graph of employment opportunities rocketing up over the last 5 years and the unemployment figures trending downwards.’
    • ‘These improvements, whilst trending in the right direction, are somewhat variable from week to week.’
    • ‘The growth has been slower since then, but still trending upward (currently at 29%)…’
    • ‘Thus, any forging of a pair-bond system within the species which trended toward promiscuity would be very slow to congeal across generations.’
    • ‘Homes are in, pubs are out, according to development trends.’
    • ‘In general, rural Federal-Aid mileage trended toward a higher proportion of higher quality surface types.’
    • ‘After hitting a low of $28.55 two days after the half year results announcement, it trended steadily upward to reach a high of $30.98 last Tuesday.’
    • ‘Although the blue states are still considerably wealthier than the red states, the red states are currently trending upwards at a faster rate.’
    • ‘The core inflation measure made its debut in the early 1970s when the headline inflation rate was trending sharply upwards.’
    • ‘Our recruiting figures have not looked better for a number of years and our retention is trending in the right direction.’
    • ‘But AIDS drugs development is trending downward.’
    • ‘But even academics who study plagiarism say they're not sure whether dishonesty is trending upward.’
    • ‘Are the occurrences trending downward or upward?’
    move, go, tend, head, drift, gravitate, swing, shift, turn, incline, lean, veer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (especially of geographical features) bend or turn away in a specified direction.
      ‘the Richelieu River trends northward to Lake Champlain’
      • ‘Structurally, the Centroiberica zone is characterized by very long, narrow synclines trending northwest to southeast, concordant to the general Armorican trend.’
      • ‘Between the major transform faults are sections of spreading centres many hundreds of kilometres long but still typically trending obliquely to the spreading direction.’
      • ‘This zone forms a narrow band that trends from Loch Eriboll south to the Isle of Skye, and is bounded on the east by the Moine thrust fault.’
      • ‘The paleoshoreline trended roughly northwest-southeast through the Big Bend region at that time.’
      • ‘A regional swarm of dykes trending east-west to SE-NW, and mainly consisting of minette and mela-syenite to mela-granite porphyries, cuts the older granitoids but does not affect the younger generation of intrusions.’
  • 2(of a topic) be the subject of many posts on a social media website within a short period of time.

    ‘I've just taken a quick look at what's trending on Twitter right now’
    ‘today's top trending topics’
    • ‘Of course on Wednesday morning, the top trending topic in San Francisco and the rest of the world was the same - Apple's new iPad tablet computer.’
    • ‘"RIP Kanye West" became the top trending topic on Twitter and the number one search term on Google.’
    • ‘By the following weekend, Paranormal Activity had become Twitter's most popular trending topic, the movie's Facebook page had over 125,000 fans, and the website had sailed past 1 m hits.’
    • ‘Exciting things like 'Stockport', 'Sugababes' and 'ebay' are trending in Manchester at the moment.’
    • ‘News of Michael Jackson's death flooded the internet last night, dominating Google trends and Twitter's trending topics as users sent out tributes and relayed reports from sites such as TMZ.com’
    • ‘KFC is still trending on Twitter - mostly in part to the brilliant Oprah grilled chicken giveaway.’
    • ‘The meme started at 11 am CST and spiked around 3 pm when it became a trending topic.’
    • ‘By the end thanks to buzz on (sorry) Twitter it was standing room only and the tag we chose to flag posts from the room #kebab was "trending" on Twitter search as one of the most talked-about phrases of the hour.’
    • ‘We'll take a look at some of the M. J. stuff trending on the Web.’
    • ‘Astronomers say that they have sent so many Perseid tweets, that they have displaced Disney's "Hannah Montana" star, Miley Cyrus, as the top trending topic on Twitter.’
    • ‘The "we love the NHS" trending topic was so popular that the site crashed on Wednesday night.’
    • ‘At one point yesterday, tags related to Apple's iPad occupied seven of the top 10 trending topics on Twitter, such was the excitement over its launch.’
    • ‘Popular topics, known as "trending" topics, appear on the main Twitter page and can significantly increase the number of tweets containing that topic.’
    • ‘See what's trending on Twitter in your local area at Trendsmap.’
    • ‘This result is not surprising; an informal view of trending topics on Twitter reveals spammers often use multiple unrelated hashtags as well as URLs in their tweets.’
    • ‘Social media blog Mashable wrote: "Trending topics are a great way to find out what's hot in the Twitterverse, but they're also a haven for malicious hackers and spammers."’
    • ‘The controversy is trending on Twitter after this bizarre voicemail from his wife.’
    • ‘Essentially, editors "update regularly, reply to followers, follow trending topics and apply hashtags where appropriate."’

Origin

Old English trendan revolve, rotate of Germanic origin; compare with trundle. The verb sense turn in a specified direction dates from the late 16th century and gave rise to the figurative use assume a general tendency in the mid 19th century, a development paralleled in the noun.

Pronunciation:

trend

/trend/