Definition of tree of knowledge in US English:

tree of knowledge

(also tree of the knowledge of good and evil)

noun

  • (in the Bible) the tree in the Garden of Eden bearing the forbidden fruit which Adam and Eve disobediently ate (Gen. 2:9, 3).

    • ‘The concept of forbidden knowledge can be traced back to Genesis in the Bible, in which Adam eats the forbidden fruit from ‘the tree of knowledge of good and evil.’’
    • ‘Why would God make the tree of knowledge if he didn't want you to eat from it?’
    • ‘Here we can see again fallen man, who has eaten of the tree of knowledge and lost his primeval, compassionate Eden.’
    • ‘You eat of the tree of knowledge, and you will surely die.’
    • ‘It celebrates the banyan tree, the bare tree of knowledge.’
    • ‘Beginning with Adam and Eve eating from the tree of knowledge, the relationship began to fall apart.’
    • ‘Again focusing on the Adam and Eve story, most thinkers blamed Eve for original sin, for tempting Adam to eat of the tree of knowledge.’
    • ‘God thrust Adam and Eve out of Eden because they ate of the tree of knowledge, and they had then to toil in pain far away from generous, pleasurable nature.’
    • ‘What God wanted to keep them from was a tree that the Bible describes as ‘the tree of knowledge of good and bad.’’
    • ‘First, God creates a garden for the man, with plants and trees for food, with the exception of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.’
    • ‘Why did God give Adam the commandment not to eat from the tree of knowledge even before Eve had been created?’
    • ‘Until this occurs we will continue to bear fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil.’
    • ‘In the middle of the garden were the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.’
    • ‘However, the tree of knowledge is part of a garden not planted until Genesis 2: 8.’
    • ‘As Abravanel argues, by yielding to the rationalistic desire, mankind abandoned the tree of life for the tree of knowledge.’
    • ‘But you shall not eat of the tree of knowledge of good and evil.’
    • ‘It seeks the tree of life by means of the tree of knowledge.’
    • ‘Inversely to the Bible, however, where the expulsion from Eden is the fruit of the tree of knowledge, the roots of Stoppard's successful ascension from his Fall are closely bound up with the fruits of knowledge.’
    • ‘In the Yahwist account, God invites the first man and woman to eat from the tree of life but commands them not to eat from the tree of knowledge.’
    • ‘It was the demon in the form of a snake that pursued Eve to eat the apple from the forbidden tree of knowledge and convinced Adam on doing the same later on.’