Main definitions of treble in English

: treble1treble2

treble1

adjective

  • 1[attributive] Consisting of three parts; threefold.

    ‘the fish were caught with large treble hooks dragged through the water’
    • ‘And while our dinner was perfectly decent, it wasn't ever a meal that should have been thinking about breaking into treble figures.’
    • ‘Single rooms are subject to a supplement of 130 and are limited to one per treble room.’
    • ‘If insiders sold stock acting on proprietary knowledge that the company was failing, there are existing laws to deal with it that can require treble damages and incarceration.’
    • ‘It came out on top at the strongly contested industry awards for engineering excellence - making it a record treble success.’
    • ‘Few students are in a position to have superstars like Kate Moss model their creations for their graduation show and attract a treble A-list audience to the occasion.’
    • ‘The company said it also is seeking treble damages under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organisations Act, bringing its total claim to more than $1.25 bn.’
    • ‘A higher plateau was reached when, within six months of joining Celtic, he had proved hugely influential in the club's only treble success outside of the Jock Stein era.’
    • ‘Peter James-Robinson also enjoyed a treble success, winning gold in the snooker and silver medals in the slalom and bowls.’
    • ‘After just two matches of the new season, the points against tally has already reached treble figures.’
    • ‘The treble chorus of bonjours came from the friendly farmer's friendly wife and his two teenage daughters, all of them creasing themselves.’
    • ‘The Export Trading Act allows the Secretary of Commerce to issue a Certificate of Review to a trading entity that protects it from criminal liability and treble damages under state and federal antitrust laws.’
    • ‘The treble winners also won a host of individual prizes from guest speaker Fred Trueman, the Yorkshire and England legend, to confirm their status as the league's outstanding side.’
    • ‘But that treble disappointment also once again stoked the fires which have fuelled his passion for the game for more than half a century, and he has already dug in for the long haul.’
    • ‘Not only did he put those rumours to rest with his outstanding contribution to United's treble triumph two years later, Sheringham has even managed to impress since returning to Spurs last summer.’
    • ‘No-one hit treble figures, yet Lancashire got there.’
    • ‘It was a pity that so few attended for the first part of the treble header as both teams served up a thriller laced with the finest of hurling skills and players with real potential for the future.’
    • ‘Sunday's eagerly awaited all parish final between Borris in Ossory and Kilcotton will provide the centrepiece of the treble header at O'Moore Park and promises to be a thrilling affair.’
    • ‘That record includes three historic treble successes - and a unique double achieved this year by Lancaster.’
    • ‘The win in the club competition was part of a treble celebration for the Southsiders as Tereasa Linsbod collected the national prize for Sheep stock-judging.’
    • ‘That one bonus point adds to the two he collects for being deemed the Knights' second-best player on the day by the Evening Press, and his treble haul takes him back to joint-top of the standings alongside Scott Rhodes.’
    high, high-frequency, soprano, treble, falsetto, shrill, acute, sharp, piping, piercing, penetrating
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Multiplied or occurring three times.
      ‘she turned back to make a double and treble check’
      • ‘There is also another parallel stream of procedure relating to proceedings brought privately, for example, proceedings to recover multiple damages, treble damages, perhaps.’
      • ‘‘The students come in and have a treble vodka with a dash of Corky's and a dash of coke, for £3.50,’ said Arthur.’
      • ‘Her second round of 55 was achieved despite a treble bogey at the downhill 16th courtesy of twos at the second, fifth, twelfth, thirteenth and seventeenth.’

predeterminer

  • Three times as much or as many.

    ‘the tip was at least treble what she would normally have given’
    • ‘Becoming a parent can be a daunting experience, but she and her husband had treble the shock when they learned they were expecting triplets.’
    • ‘For working on a public holiday, they will receive treble their usual pay.’
    • ‘She was asked to pay double the next week and if she still didn't have the money she was asked to pay treble the following week and all the time the interest was mounting.’
    • ‘It has offered security guards treble time but they have still got insufficient numbers.’
    • ‘The share of one-room dwellings is urban areas is treble the share in rural areas.’
    • ‘Betfred is giving away a free £10 Lucky 15 on the St Leger meeting at Doncaster on Saturday and will pay treble the odds for only one winner.’

noun

  • 1A threefold quantity or thing, in particular.

    1. 1.1 (in show jumping) a fence consisting of three elements.
    2. 1.2 A crochet stitch made with three loops of wool on the hook at a time.
    3. 1.3 A drink of liquor of three times the standard measure.

pronoun

  • A number or amount that is three times as large as a contrasting or usual number or amount.

    ‘by virtue of having paid treble, he had a double room to himself’

verb

  • Make or become three times as large or numerous.

    [with object] ‘rents were doubled and probably trebled’
    [no object] ‘his salary has trebled in a couple of years’
    • ‘Recycling is at its highest ever level, with some authorities in Yorkshire doubling and even trebling their rates in a year.’
    • ‘Tax breaks have meant a few hundred more houses and the population of the town more than trebles in the summer months.’
    • ‘By now, some of the original residents of the distillery, those who bought their apartments on that first weekend, have witnessed their investment treble in value.’
    • ‘What happens in open water, or in another bay where there is little or no nutrient by comparison, is that the size will have to be doubled, trebled, or quadrupled sometimes, to achieve the same carrying capacity.’
    • ‘Electricity costs will probably treble, according to that representative.’
    • ‘By the time it hits the city shelves, imported fruit more than trebles in price.’
    • ‘Economies were not the only things that boomed in the Gulf: demography did too, and many of the Gulf states doubled and even trebled their populations, leaving less openings for foreigners to fill.’
    • ‘The working day should be of six hours at most, and annual holidays doubled or trebled.’
    • ‘Half a billion people already use them, a figure expected to more than treble in five years.’
    • ‘The number of people aged 80 years and over is forecast to more than treble from 98,000 in 2001, to about 320,000 in 2036.’
    • ‘The market for organic food in Ireland is expected to more than treble over the next four years.’
    • ‘And he is probably calculating his salary will double or treble at a stroke.’
    • ‘He was only persuaded into staying put last summer, amid offers from abroad to treble his salary, by the promise that he could go home after this season for a nominal fee.’
    • ‘Department for Transport forecasts suggest it will double in 20 years and treble in 30.’
    • ‘But without an effective rural medical network, fighting rural epidemics would probably need double or treble the effort.’
    • ‘In Botswana, with a relatively wealthy economy due to income from diamond mining, it is estimated that health spending will more than treble over the next 10 years.’
    • ‘In all, some 15.5 million pills were confiscated and the street price for the drug doubled or trebled over the course of the three months from February 1 to April 30.’
    • ‘We'll find that hard enough to explain to Baron Tellian without doubling or trebling the butcher's bill.’
    • ‘Those in work have seen their salaries trebled or quadrupled and unemployment is falling.’
    • ‘The number of successful independent television companies in Scotland must more than treble if the industry is to flourish, according to Stuart Cosgrove, head of nations and regions at Channel 4.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin triplus (see triple).

Pronunciation:

treble

/ˈtrebəl/

Main definitions of treble in English

: treble1treble2

treble2

noun

  • 1A high-pitched voice, especially a boy's singing voice.

    • ‘The eerie sound of the air passing through wing feathers differs with each bird, from a low treble, to a high whistle, to one sirenlike whine.’
    1. 1.1 A boy or girl with a treble voice.
      • ‘Other performers included boy trebles and members of St Thomas's Church choir, members of Salisbury Amateur Operatic Society and Studio Theatre.’
      • ‘The choir now has sixteen boy trebles and thirteen men (on all the other parts), some of whom are professional singers and some of whom are students at Christ Church.’
      • ‘This strongly implies that even in the Durham version the verse material, as in the original consort song, was meant to be sung by a treble.’
      • ‘The concert happened to be performed by an old acquaintance of mine, who I used to know many moons ago, when we were both angelic little trebles in local parish church choir.’
      • ‘The choir needs six more trebles aged seven to 14, a couple of basses and tenors, and perhaps an alto or two.’
      • ‘Five years earlier, in 1735 as a treble, he had sung the role of Oberto in Alcina.’
      • ‘The sound is an ‘English’ sound, strongly influenced by the voices of boy trebles, though it sounds to me more like women singing with a straight tone.’
      • ‘Tavener cautions us in the liner notes not to expect anything ‘dramatic in the Western sense’, and so the treble repeats his phrase to launch all Paul's verses.’
      • ‘He started out as a boy treble and later, after his voice broke, joined Ontario's provincial youth choir.’
      • ‘When I was eight years old I started at the Choir School at Canterbury Cathedral and a year or so later joined the cathedral choir as a treble.’
      • ‘So he would seem to be one of that unfortunate breed of outstanding trebles who develop into merely adequate adult singers.’
      • ‘We've always had a choir made up of boy and girl trebles, together with male altos, tenors and basses.’
      • ‘Sustained lines for the soprano, joined by a boy treble kept from his bed for five minutes' worth of work, provide vocal variety.’
      • ‘His wife plays the flute and the recorder and his son sings as a treble.’
      • ‘The trebles float the highest notes with admirable assurance and no suspicion of strain.’
      • ‘They sing with relish, and understanding, and only the busy part-writing towards the end of Haydn's Te Deum appears ready to swallow the trebles.’
    2. 1.2 A part written for a high voice or an instrument of a high pitch.
      • ‘The Prelude no.15 itself begins as an idyllic stroll full of anticipation and becomes more emphatic as the bass line takes over the melody and the treble assumes the role of harmony.’
      • ‘This sequence had me taut with apprehension, and I jumped at the sudden dominance of bass and screeching treble.’
      • ‘Believe me when I say this, there's not much treble on this album.’
      • ‘The piece requires the player to shift the focus of the melody line from the treble to the bass.’
      • ‘Top 40 hits sounded excellent too, with thumping bass notes and nice trebles.’
      • ‘One of the album's principle plagues is the near total lack of low-end - - all that unsupported treble gets tiresome after a while.’
      • ‘I think it probably just means that you, like me, follow the treble.’
      • ‘You lose the crispness of the trebles and the rich thrum of the bass.’
      • ‘The harsh treble of the theme music is not particularly pleasant, although advancing a chapter allows you to skip straight to the action and avoid that problem altogether.’
      • ‘For them, the call of each of these birds is distinct, with its own melody, structure, pitch, base and treble.’
    3. 1.3[as modifier] Denoting a relatively high-pitched member of a family of similar instruments.
      ‘a treble viol’
      • ‘The 17th and 18th-century trio sonata was a favourite chamber ensemble, using two treble instruments and one bass, with a keyboard or lute continuo to fill in the harmony.’
      • ‘The purchase of a full chest of instruments (usually two each of trebles, tenors, and basses) would encourage the training of family members to play them.’
      • ‘The prototype treble was soon replaced with two new generation lattice trebles made by the late Eugene Phillip and I made a lattice baritone in 1996, and a lattice bass in 2001.’
      • ‘There are three main sizes of modern oboe: the normal treble, the alto oboe d' amore, and the tenor cor anglais or English horn.’
    4. 1.4 The smallest and highest-pitched bell of a set.
      • ‘Thus the final instalment in the story was the casting and installing of the two treble bells of ten.’
      • ‘By 2004 enough money had been raised to cast two new treble bells and complete the ring of ten.’
      • ‘And most crucially, the treble bells could be replaced with new ones better matched to the bass bells.’
      • ‘The ring of bells at St Bene't's was completed in 1663 when the treble bell of the six was hung.’
      • ‘Twenty mid-range bells have been replaced, and twenty one smaller treble bells have been added.’
    5. 1.5 The high-frequency output of an audio system or radio, corresponding to the treble in music.
      • ‘Vanguard's recording preserves most of the piano's dynamic range, betrayed only by some fuzziness in the treble.’
      • ‘Instead, it sounds like some of the upper range treble was simple repeated out of the rear channels - so you get a slight echo off Marley's voice and the cymbals.’
      • ‘For example, if there is too much bass, decrease the bass and/or increase the treble.’
      • ‘Bass response is minimal and most of the film languishes in the midrange and treble, but overall, it is not an unpleasant presentation.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, there are no separate treble controls on the satellites or the woofer, so you will have to deal with the level of treble within software, if allowed.’
      • ‘The most basic signal processing is already in the head-end unit and can take the form of tone controls like bass and treble, and other functions to balance the sound from front to back or side to side.’
      • ‘Apart from good sound, you will find controls for bass, treble and sound balance that is not common in PDAs.’
      • ‘It's all treble and no bass, tragic potential utterly untapped.’
      • ‘The treble was champagne-fuelled voices and the bass was rolling out of huge speakers around the edge of a low-ceilinged room with two or three hundred people in it.’
      • ‘The balance between treble and bass is just right and there's no doubting this is a top-notch system that any self-respecting audiophile would be happy to own.’
      • ‘The 5.1 track is a step up, with bright trebles and excellent distribution to the rear channels.’
      • ‘The bass is the comforting smoothness, and the treble is the piercing clarity.’
      • ‘One wall is made up of cabinets containing hundreds of CDs, and a stereo on which the bass and treble are permanently turned up full.’
      • ‘The levels are balanced, and there is a nice mix of treble and bass.’
      • ‘Likewise, audio is clean and remarkably dynamic; even the extensive use of treble in the bird song doesn't reveal any distortion or buzz.’
      • ‘There are no advanced volume settings such as treble or bass.’
      • ‘I know that I usually find my feet tapping to the treble.’
      • ‘The two satellite speakers sit near by monitor and allow me to further adjust bass and treble at a push of a button.’
      • ‘The bass is more present than before, and the occasional stridency of the treble has been tamed without an apparent loss of musical information.’
      • ‘To the right, the Presence control adds treble by reducing the amount of high frequencies in the feedback loop.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from treble, because it was the highest part in a three-part contrapuntal composition.

Pronunciation:

treble

/ˈtrebəl/