Definition of transcend in English:

transcend

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Be or go beyond the range or limits of (something abstract, typically a conceptual field or division)

    ‘this was an issue transcending party politics’
    • ‘It should be a political no-brainer, an issue that transcends right-left divisions.’
    • ‘This requires coordinated intergovernmental action because these activities transcend national boundaries.’
    • ‘As already mentioned, the theory of conceptual blending transcends the study of metaphor.’
    • ‘We can therefore form a conception of reality that transcends these limits and so separate reality from what we believe about reality.’
    • ‘The appeal transcends the issues as any appeal to a national leader should.’
    • ‘Just as quality of life issues often transcend class lines, they also bridge the gulf between the city centre and the suburbs.’
    • ‘The vitality of the field has transcended many of the barriers that seemed so daunting early on.’
    • ‘Quality of life is an important concept that transcends cultural boundaries and gives way to needed change.’
    • ‘Despite its relatively small size, the superb acoustics of the Usher Hall have transcended its role beyond that of a venue for the odd civil function.’
    • ‘It holds out the prospect of transcending the limits of privatised existence, of being known to the general public and of becoming part of society's collective experience.’
    • ‘No, I really do think that this case transcends this one particular issue.’
    • ‘It's certainly not as if the movie's interpretation transcended the limits of romance.’
    • ‘We transcend these limits to find a love that is magical and created by a force greater than us, just for us.’
    • ‘In this context, going beyond the form means transcending the notion of bread as commodity and examining the labor that made it possible.’
    • ‘Love is what engages and transcends mundane limits toward accomplishment.’
    • ‘Real spiritual practices can help one to transcend material activities.’
    • ‘By transcending the limits of space, time and situation, this technology makes it more likely that any person, of any status, in any place, can learn anything, at any time.’
    • ‘‘Blood’, by contrast, had been invested since antiquity with mythical meaning, transcending the common sphere of everyday life.’
    • ‘The fourteen essays gathered here embrace a range of issues which perhaps transcend the limits suggested by the subtitle.’
    • ‘Ultimately, he is strangely apolitical, incapable of transcending the limits of the entertainment industry.’
    go beyond, rise above, cut across
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    1. 1.1 Surpass (a person or an achievement)
      • ‘Rather, some songs transcend their own authors in such a way that they can only be sung by a particular voice.’
      • ‘People that transcend their class background often have this dynamism, but sometimes also display a fierce pride that can feel like anger.’
      • ‘There is nothing that transcends God so nothing is greater than his essence.’
      • ‘‘His personality has transcended the sport faster than probably anybody else,’ he states.’
      surpass, excel, exceed, beat, trump, top, cap, outdo, outstrip, leave behind, outrival, outvie, outrank, outshine, eclipse, overstep, overshadow, throw into the shade, upstage
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Origin

Middle English: from Old French transcendre or Latin transcendere, from trans- across + scandere climb.

Pronunciation:

transcend

/tran(t)ˈsend/