Definition of trackage in English:

trackage

noun

North American
  • The tracks or lines of a railroad system collectively.

    • ‘Only special events cross busy route 322 and traverse the scenic backyard and in-street trackage leading to the end of the line.’
    • ‘Both are attempts to condemn the trackage by rail companies that claim they are disconnected from service and will never be used again.’
    • ‘By 1911 Birmingham spread over sixty-two and a half square miles, yet there was only half as much street railway trackage as in Cleveland.’
    • ‘After Babylon, we entered the world of non-electrified trackage and grade crossings.’
    • ‘The facility presently has trackage for a 100-car unit train.’
    • ‘When the Canal Streetcar starts running, it will use the existing Riverfront trackage between this location and the Esplanade terminus.’
    • ‘It wasn't until 1898 when the Astoria & Columbia River connected Astoria to the NP line, with trackage rights to Portland.’
    • ‘Union Pacific also has trackage in the state, and at least two short-line railroads offer freight service from small communities to main lines.’
    • ‘We had made up a little time here between Staunton and Culpepper, but lost it upon entering NS trackage because of work on the line or a track slow down.’
    • ‘We use a non-standard signalling on most of our trackage, except for parts that we inherited from another operator.’
    • ‘We all went to places to which we had not been before, and got to ride new trackage at the various tourist railroads we visited.’
    • ‘Piles of donated rail abound and some new trackage has been laid.’
    • ‘Private sidings came into being whereby the industry owned the trackage on their own property.’
    • ‘Though Cleveland had twice as much trackage and ridership as Birmingham, both cities mechanised and municipalised their street railways during the same period.’
    • ‘But the challenge there is just enormous, not to mention all the trackage and all the miles involved.’
    • ‘At yards and terminals, thin lines are used to indicate the outlines of the limit of trackage.’
    • ‘We got a little non-revenue trackage thanks to his generosity.’
    • ‘Eight thousand miles of trackage lace the Chicago area, so it's imperative to get cars rolling out of so congested a district first, and classify them for delivery later.’
    • ‘It once totalled over 100 miles of trackage requiring about two dozen locomotives.’
    • ‘These companies operated two-thirds of Cleveland's street railway trackage.’

Pronunciation:

trackage

/ˈtrakij/