Main definitions of tote in US English:

: tote1Tote2

tote1

verb

[with object]informal
  • Carry, wield, or convey (something heavy or substantial)

    ‘here are books well worth toting home’
    as adjective, in combination ‘a gun-toting loner’
    • ‘If young people are going around toting weapons, then that is because the laws already in existence are not being enforced.’
    • ‘Walking behind him in single file were four beautiful women - one carried a pair of huge sneakers, another had a towel draped around her shoulders, a third toted sweat socks, and the fourth had a small bottle of cologne.’
    • ‘In other words, they are our anti-establishment, book toting superheroes.’
    • ‘For a writer, toting a notebook and pen legitimizes virtually any activity carried out in a bar, restaurant or cemetery.’
    • ‘Each man carried two canteens, and the party as a whole toted half a dozen or so two-gallon camp kettles.’
    • ‘What he saw was two men toting their guns, waiting for him to get out.’
    • ‘Still, I noted that our ground crew made a point of toting a bottle of champagne around, in case a peace offering was in order.’
    • ‘With newfound confidence, Mary Catherine went to some trade shows in New York, toting her stationery.’
    • ‘He was wearing a gorgeous business suit and toting a brief case.’
    • ‘He walked around several people toting heavy boxes, to the door where his folder had disappeared.’
    • ‘Outside my back door, I see the neighbor's black cat toting a dead baby rat.’
    • ‘Witnesses said that two Hispanic men were seen toting the garments away.’
    • ‘Spend the day toting kids around to school and the store.’
    • ‘As a restaurateur turned guitar toting sea-dog with his own yacht, he probably knows what he's talking about.’
    • ‘The story is a series of improbable events that lead to armed ex-convicts toting a nuclear device to a plane bound for the Bahamas.’
    • ‘In one drill, he toted a 3-pound football, about three times heavier than a regulation model.’
    • ‘He carried eight times for 14 yards in Week Four after toting the rock 37 times in Week Three.’
    • ‘It is a theme park devoted to the lost socialist Atlantis complete with sub-machine gun toting guards and a rebuilt stretch of the Berlin Wall.’
    • ‘Men toting guns were ransacking shops of whatever they could carry.’
    • ‘No-one likes having foreigners toting guns in their country and the coalition forces should leave the instant they are no longer needed.’
    carry, lift, bear, heave, hoist, shoulder, manhandle
    View synonyms

noun

informal
  • short for tote bag
    • ‘It's fun to collect things and keep them all in a tote for a snowy day.’
    • ‘This cute striped tote is perfect for carrying your lunch to school or as a simple purse.’
    • ‘A woman who first seems to be carrying a patch of cloud-mottled sky in her lap proves to be clutching a blue net tote containing crumpled tissue and mail.’
    • ‘A tote is probably the most popular luggage piece and it is perfect for those last minute must haves while you are away!’
    • ‘In one gray plastic bin a lilac cardigan, neatly folded, nestles against a small black canvas tote.’
    • ‘By itself, a WaterField Cargo Bag is a convenient, stylish tote for your cell phone, keys, newspapers, documents, and other stuff.’
    • ‘With a squeal of excitement, she dove into her calfskin tote and snatched out her cell, her face lighting up happily.’
    • ‘OK, so you've forgotten your tote, and you've ended up with a plastic bag.’
    • ‘The line includes totes, packs, and handbags in sizes for every need.’
    • ‘She opened her tote (woven rattan, a knock-off on the latest Newport style) and flipped through her now well-worn Vogue, focused on the society snapshot pages.’
    • ‘It was then that I discovered the beauty of the tote and messenger bag, and their next-generation cousins - bowling ball bag, duffel tote or, my personal favourite, the diaper bag.’
    • ‘If it is leather, suede, or a leather-fabric combination, a tote can be a good companion for a work outfit.’
    • ‘Within the small tote at his side lies the journal into which he places all of his thoughts and recollections.’
    • ‘I bought a $25 orange tote and other steals, including an Asian dress that goes nicely over jeans and a pair of in-vogue jeweled slippers.’
    • ‘Crossing the carpeted floor to the counter, I set my tote on the gray marble surface and unzipped it.’
    • ‘After you pay for your items and the cashier gives you a bag, simply put that bag down into your tote and you won't have to worry about the straps breaking or becoming weak.’
    • ‘To begin with, the Magic Bag comes as either a tote or a backpack.’
    • ‘At first glance, an accessory is just that - a cute little handbag, a pair of shoes, a tote…’
    • ‘Lily picked Petal up and put her back in the tote.’
    • ‘It easily converts from a tote to a backpack, and includes a front organizer for business essentials, side mesh pockets for water bottle and accessories, and adjustable backpack straps.’

Origin

Late 17th century: probably of dialect origin.

Pronunciation

tote

/tōt//toʊt/

Main definitions of tote in US English:

: tote1Tote2

Tote2

noun

the Tote
British
trademark
  • A system of betting based on the use of the totalizator, in which dividends are calculated according to the amount staked rather than odds offered.

    • ‘This year, more than €7 million will be placed in bets at the tote at the racecourse and another €20 million in betting shops.’
    • ‘Proceedings will get underway and the white flag will be raised at 9.30 pm and it is expected that a large crowd will turn out on the night to enjoy a night of good fun and crack with plenty of money exchanging hands at the tote.’
    • ‘Tramore's August Racing Festival attracted record attendances of 27,000 over the four days with racegoers wagering over €2m with the bookmakers and on the tote.’
    • ‘In Victoria, in contrast, race clubs had legalised bookmakers and banned the tote.’
    • ‘Site licensees include hotels, taverns, shebeens, pubs, bookmakers and totes that provide premises where gambling machines may be played and who must obtain their machines from licensed route operators.’
    • ‘And he's not convinced the totes will lose that many customers.’
    • ‘But was there something about - I mean he came essentially from the wrong side of the tracks; because of his background in horse racing and the totes, the illegal activities, he was shunned by a great section of Melbourne society.’
    • ‘The five event card entertained a loyal band of Barkly race goers, who could participate in on course punting with the tote and Alice bookmaker Garry Owen on hand.’
    • ‘Between bookmakers and tote over 50000 changed hands.’
    • ‘Australian libertarianism (not just libertinism) found its feet during those many long hours of arguing whether the tote should be privatized.’
    • ‘Excluded from this scenario are the betting exchanges - who as with the totes, only take commission on bets and therefore have no exposure on the result.’
    • ‘The winner which was the 6/4 favourite with the layers paid over 7/1 on the tote.’
    • ‘The totes were kept busy throughout the afternoon with the lucky winners collecting their cash.’
    • ‘Guests then registered with the totes for a minimum of 100 and received a 30 free bet.’
    • ‘As a result, the good chances in the race pay better dividends on the tote.’
    • ‘There was a great night's entertainment had by all with several shrewd punters making money on the tote and others leaving the premises with quite a hole in their pockets.’
    • ‘That slice of a reduced margin is only on Betfair profits, not a percentage of turnover as happens via racing with the totes and bookies here.’

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

Tote

/toʊt//tōt/