Main definitions of tot in English

: tot1tot2tot3

tot1

noun

  • 1A very young child.

    • ‘Dressed as vegetables, animals, rainbows and even as Day & Night, tiny tots stood up for the animals and the veg-lovers.’
    • ‘About 50 tiny tots said goodbye to television for a while.’
    • ‘These sessions promise to be enjoyable storytimes for tiny tots and toddlers.’
    • ‘And it is the tiny tots who seem to be in the limelight.’
    • ‘What's more, there's a glimmer in her eye, whenever she talks about the second generation of tiny tots at her play school.’
    • ‘While the skaters who range from tiny tots to teenagers find their rhythm, curious passers-by gather to have a look.’
    • ‘Tiny tots in the age group of 1-10 years participated in the competitions.’
    • ‘The raiders broke into the community centre where the toddler group meets and ransacked four rooms, helping themselves to drinks and chocolate that had been bought for the tots.’
    • ‘Many schools wore a festive look; sweets were distributed to tiny tots and one school provided free insurance cover for children.’
    • ‘The students who visited the village on February 5 spent that day and the next with the crowd of teenagers and tiny tots there.’
    • ‘From tiny tots to teenagers, the camp is the place to be for those willing to spend free time - a valuable commodity these days - productively.’
    • ‘The breathtaking performance by the tiny tots, who represented the presence of the Sindhis in different parts of the world, was commendable.’
    • ‘It was a wonderful sight to watch the tiny tots toddle on the stage without any fear.’
    • ‘From five-year-old tiny tots to the 40 plus, they moved and grooved.’
    • ‘It was the first annual day of the Daffodils Playschool a few days ago, and the tiny tots treated the audience to the colourful culture of India and those of distant lands.’
    • ‘Over 200 tiny tots, all orphans, from Helpage Care India and Sharada Mandir flocked to the club, off Mysore Road, to celebrate the event.’
    • ‘The children of various age groups presented a colourful mosaic of music and dance and tiny tots danced to the beats of the songs with perfect grace and style.’
    • ‘Dance classes for girls and boys by the Mulcahy-Bible School of Dancing will take place every Wednesday at 2.15 for tiny tots and 3.15 for all ages.’
    • ‘At the Institute of Child Health, Egmore, the children had surprise visitors bringing with them plenty of smiles for the tiny tots.’
    • ‘She was scanned once a week from 30 weeks onwards because the tot was not putting on the expected amount of weight.’
    baby, babe, infant, toddler, newborn, tiny tot, child, little one, mite
    View synonyms
  • 2British A small amount of a strong alcoholic drink such as whiskey or brandy.

    ‘a tot of brandy’
    • ‘For 40 of those 60 minutes we weren't allowed to touch a drop from the four wine glasses in front of us, each with a tot of amber liquid.’
    • ‘Afterwards we were treated to free samples of Helen's strudel and a tot of the local hooch, raki, a colourless liquid drunk like schnapps which is not for the faint-hearted.’
    • ‘In Ronald Burton Milner's case, the drop is a tot of whisky before he goes to bed and a glass of Guinness with his Sunday lunch.’
    • ‘Linus liked a drink and it was always said that in the trenches, when the soldiers were given a tot of rum before going over the top, Linus made short work of his own tot and those of anyone who didn't like rum as well.’
    • ‘And if she enjoyed a tot of Scotch whiskey every now and then, well, they liked that too.’
    • ‘His coachman's way of keeping warm was to have a tot of whisky while he was waiting for the Archbishop to come out of the theatre.’
    • ‘At a far corner of the clubroom two astute gentlemen were, like some of the other members, sipping their tot of whiskey and engaged in hushed conversation.’
    • ‘Drinkers could purchase a tot of liquor for as little as 1d or a few cowrie shells, and so it reached the poorer sections of Nigerian society.’
    • ‘I wanted to drop that experience like a tot of honeyed mead into my subconscious, for my own, selfish poetic reasons.’
    • ‘One of the biggest studies into drinking has found that wine, beer and even a daily tot of whisky can lengthen your life and protect the body against the diseases of ageing.’
    • ‘Before its end, he would take his men through a minefield, capture a trench full of German soldiers without firing a shot - and enjoy a tot of rum from a jug he clung to as dearly as life itself when he was submerged below the landing craft.’
    • ‘Always on duty when crews returned from missions, he would offer solace and a welcome tot of rum.’
    • ‘Horatio enjoys dry clothes and a tot of rum, as well as the news that the Admiralty has confirmed him as Lieutenant in recognition of his courage during the fire ship attack at Gibraltar.’
    • ‘Like his predecessors, Lt Patrick Ryan caught his dolphins between his teeth from the bottom of the glass as he knocked back a tot of rum.’
    • ‘Centenarian Harold Barrett today revealed his secret for long life - hard work and a regular tot of whisky.’
    • ‘If your outdoor sugaring labors have left you with a chill, you may care to fortify, for medicinal purposes, your hot maple tea with a tot of Jamaica rum.’
    • ‘A comrade gave him a tot of rum and a sixpence to bite on.’
    • ‘She likes a tot of whisky and has always been a flirt, especially with the doctors.’
    • ‘That was the reaction of a mother after an inquest heard that her son died when he swam in the River Ouse after drinking the equivalent of 16 tots of whisky.’
    • ‘Any grog remaining at the bottom of the tub - and there were often several tots of it - was known as ‘plushers’.’
    dram, small measure, drink, nip, slug, drop, draught, swallow, swig
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century (originally dialect): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tot

/tät//tɑt/

Main definitions of tot in English

: tot1tot2tot3

tot2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]tot something up
British
  • 1Add up numbers or amounts.

    ‘she totted up some figures’
    • ‘An MP3 player and pedometer in one, it tots up the distance you have covered and the time it has taken while you listen to your favourite tunes.’
    • ‘The second best player will receive two points and the third best one point, and those points will be totted up during the year.’
    • ‘When we totted up the capital projects in Cardiff which were solely dedicated to cultural activities we came up with a total of 19, adding up to £578m of funding - most of it provided by the government and the city.’
    • ‘But I'm pretty sure that if they were all totted up, we would be into quite a few millions.’
    • ‘We just totted up how much we ate and priced it against the regular menu and we managed £45.00 pounds worth.’
    • ‘Then I totted up the prices and decided I'd had a moment of unsustainable madness, so I selected just the one - C.P. Cafavy: Collected Poems - and put the rest back with reluctance and a few sighs.’
    • ‘I'll tot them all up later - please feel free to submit more.’
    • ‘It's easy to think you're doing 4 hours of revision a day but when you tot it up, you realise it's only an hour.’
    • ‘Details of the funds raised for them following his funeral have only just been totted up and made known.’
    • ‘With his team already through to the second stage, this result probably will not matter to United when the final points in Group F are totted up.’
    • ‘No matter how many times we totted it up, the chromosome count never rose above 46 (with a bit missing if you were a man).’
    • ‘For the purposes of voting, the ballots of one or two obscure communes - no shortage of these - may be totted up under the aegis of a larger one.’
    • ‘After all the countries report their votes, they're totted up and the winner is proclaimed.’
    • ‘The proceeds of all the transactions are totted up, and then divided by the total number of sales to reach an average sale price.’
    • ‘Finally I drifted off to sleep at about 3am, and, between then and the first mobile phone ringing at 5.45 am, I must have had, when you tot it all up, a good hour and a half's kip.’
    • ‘There are no dumb blondes or doormats; all of these women know the score and can tot it up in their heads without a calculator.’
    • ‘But I suppose it is easy to tot up the points - and maybe he was just more honest than the rest of the audience (like a spoil-sport, I refused to participate).’
    • ‘The latter happily totted up how much of his earnings - half a million - ended up against a toilet wall.’
    • ‘Your modern political accountants, as they scavenge through history to make the case for the prosecution, have they totted up the deaths caused by colonialism, and capitalism?’
    • ‘We'd actually put Greece at the head of the pack by the time we'd totted everything up, and correctly predicted that the UK would come last.’
    add, total, sum, count, calculate, compute, reckon, enumerate, tally, work something out, figure something out, take stock of something, quantify
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Accumulate something over a period of time.
      ‘he has already totted up 89 victories’
      • ‘Never mind all the plays, poems and novels he wrote; d' Annunzio was a ladies' man who totted up in excess of 100 lovers.’
      • ‘Indeed, Lightbody's profligacy explained why Jed only managed to tot up six first-half points, through a Clark Laidlaw drop goal - in the eighth minute and Kevin Amos' penalty.’
      • ‘Last year Matthew earned $506,273 in 27 starts, totted up seven top-ten finishes and, famously, made the putt that regained the Solheim Cup from American clutches.’
      • ‘We've totted up a few but which songs do you think deserve honorary number one status?’
      • ‘Members of the York branch of the Dunkirk Veterans Association totted up an impressive £1,131 for their cause when they mounted a day's cash-collecting offensive in the Coppergate Centre.’
      • ‘He only recently returned to the side after six weeks out with a neck injury, but the booking he picked up at Hartlepool United on Boxing Day means he has totted up too many disciplinary points.’
      • ‘‘I was one of the culprits,’ Nolan said as Wanderers totted up a number of missed opportunities.’
      • ‘At the age of 35, Lopez has totted up more than her fair share of broken marriages and relationships.’
      • ‘Manchester University student Louise Magee has totted up a debt of almost £13,000 in the last three years.’
      • ‘If they tot up 12 or more points, their licence is taken away.’
      • ‘I myself seriously need to get on my bike again - this week has seen me complete something like 40 miles, whereas the three previous weeks had seen me tot up around 1000 miles.’
      • ‘Swindon Services, the arm of the council responsible for street cleaning and other frontline work, totted up savings of £210,000 last year.’
      • ‘It required an assured batting display at Broadwater to secure the 12 points after the visitors had inserted Fleetwood and watched them tot up 208-6 off their 57 overs.’
      • ‘In seven innings in all forms of cricket so far this season he has totted up 428 runs at an average of 71.33.’
      accumulate, gather, build up, amass, accrue, stockpile, acquire
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: from archaic tot ‘set of figures to be added up’, abbreviation of total or of Latin totum ‘the whole’.

Pronunciation

tot

/tɑt//tät/

Main definitions of tot in English

: tot1tot2tot3

tot3

verb

[NO OBJECT]usually as noun totting
British
informal
  • Salvage salable items from garbage cans or piles of waste.

    ‘local authorities frown on totting and many ban it outright’

Origin

Late 19th century: from slang tot ‘bone’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tot

/tɑt//tät/