Definition of too in US English:

too

adverb

  • 1as submodifier To a higher degree than is desirable, permissible, or possible; excessively.

    ‘he was driving too fast’
    ‘he wore suits that seemed a size too small for him’
    • ‘A small number in the queue do have an NHS dentist, but the wait is too long to see them.’
    • ‘Most amateurs that I play with tend to try to hit the ball too hard, especially off the tee.’
    • ‘Its beauty is dependent on its dampness and greenness, and it looks awful when it is too dry.’
    • ‘By the end, the film has become far too serious in its attitude and it becomes quite dreary.’
    • ‘Work on the master plan needs to begin because the area has waited for too long already.’
    • ‘If one waits too long, then the patient can be so frail and unfit that surgery is no longer an option.’
    • ‘The court also said the cell phone companies waited too long to object to the rule.’
    • ‘The blokes took it all far too seriously and before long it got very competitive.’
    • ‘The judge said the offences were too serious for anything but a custodial sentence.’
    • ‘Alice is probably lumping me in with the people who take the wrong things too seriously.’
    • ‘Just over half of those asked said waiting on hold for too long was their pet hate.’
    • ‘These are not the answers you would expect from people too frightened to speak freely.’
    • ‘As it turned out, they arrived at the New Forest nursery too late and decided to head back.’
    • ‘The sauce was rich and tangy without ever becoming too hot, and the fish was nicely moist.’
    • ‘The ruby hue is due to tiny gold particles too small to see with the naked eye.’
    • ‘As the blaze raged on fire chiefs decided it was too dangerous to tackle directly.’
    • ‘This project is too important to ever be hindered by a lack of funds or resources.’
    • ‘We decided it was too cold for a jet wash so I was sent back inside the garage for a token for the proper car wash.’
    • ‘Do you think that this is fair or is it too early to make a realistic judgment?’
    • ‘However, if you leave it too late, or wait to see if rates fall further, you could lose out.’
    excessively, overly, over, unduly, immoderately, inordinately, unreasonably, ridiculously, to too great an degree, to too great an extent, extremely, very
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal Very.
      ‘you're too kind’
      • ‘We didn't have to wait too long before we got in and I must say that Santa was very good.’
      • ‘She had some very important news to tell Jake, and she didn't want to have to wait too long!’
      • ‘I had to do a bit of work this morning but nothing too taxing, then I decided to rush off and find this cache.’
      • ‘It was not too uncommon for girls to pretend to be boys and sneak into the army.’
      • ‘At night, they slept as husband and wife, and she had to admit, he was not too awful with her.’
  • 2In addition; also.

    ‘is he coming too?’
    • ‘Runs can come quickly, too, especially if the ball is new and there are gaps in the field.’
    • ‘Thousands more workers will be terrified that they too could be caught in the jobs cull.’
    • ‘She was moved by this story and decided that she too must become a mathematician.’
    • ‘She then has to solve the riddle of the tape before she too falls victim to its curse.’
    • ‘The quote might be seen to have a resonance for his own situation as leader in waiting, too.’
    • ‘Under the guise of sociology, the film manages to slip us a fair amount of gynaecology too.’
    • ‘It all seems to be well put together too, with solid construction and good fit and finish.’
    • ‘He was jostling for what could have been a strong points finish when he too was forced to retire.’
    • ‘Consider fixing up some bat boxes too, high up on a wall, near the eaves of the house or in a tall tree.’
    • ‘He was moving that day too and we decided to help each other, plus he'd got the van for free from his work.’
    • ‘She has decided, too, to concentrate on her game for a few years to the exclusion of all else.’
    • ‘It had all happened so fast and now we too were bemused, not knowing what to do next.’
    • ‘I could see there was a lot of other stuff inside there too, and a lot more money besides.’
    • ‘There are lots of fun places to take the youngsters too, including zoos and water parks.’
    • ‘Michael took another step closer to her and she noticed that he too had slept in his clothes.’
    • ‘Our style was simple too: win the ball and get it to the backs as quickly as possible.’
    • ‘It was a marathon for them too - having to wait around in the pouring rain for six hours!’
    • ‘The people of Barking did too, and they sent a strong message to the new government.’
    • ‘Once your hair is really long consider tying it back in a loose plait at bedtime too.’
    • ‘He zeroes in on the face of an old woman, showing that the weak and elderly are victims too.’
    also, as well, in addition, additionally, into the bargain, besides, furthermore, moreover, yet, on top of that, to boot
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Moreover (used when adding a further point)
      ‘she is a grown woman, and a strong one too’
      • ‘Note too that we would not even consider this to be a coherent semantic field in English.’
      • ‘You know, it was good to see him back here, and I think he was strong all weekend, too.’
      • ‘He knows every world leader on this planet, and possibly those on other planets too.’
      • ‘They got a return match and won it too by four wickets at the same venue two weeks later.’
      • ‘For the same premiums you not only paid off the house but you got extra money too.’

Phrases

  • all too —

    • Used to emphasize that something is the case to an extreme or unwelcome extent.

      ‘failures are all too common’
      • ‘Even so, bankers are all too aware of the notorious fragility of their sector.’
      • ‘It's all too easy to get carried away at Christmas time - and spend the rest of the year paying for it.’
      • ‘Use of inappropriate methods for the analysis of cost data is all too common.’
      • ‘Here is a story of our times - one which is all too common and all too regrettable.’
      • ‘Despite the change in the law regarding this action, this sight is still all too common.’
      • ‘As a nurse manager of a nursing home in Malton I am all too familiar with this disgraceful scenario.’
      • ‘It was mayhem, fuelled by bar staff and a pub industry all too willing to serve drink after drink after drink.’
      • ‘He is all too aware that the season could have panned out very differently.’
      • ‘Brief moments of brilliance gave the crowd room for cheer but it was all too fleeting.’
      • ‘Secondly, they may recall or understand all too well but deliberately dissemble.’
  • none too —

    • Far from; not very.

      ‘her sight's none too good’
      • ‘From what I can see, she's none too happy about the news media's performance.’
      • ‘As you can imagine, some sections of the political arena are none too happy about this.’
      • ‘Sadly, despite looking great, the website doesn't seem to have been updated recently and it's none too user-friendly.’
      • ‘Then there was the lady who was none too happy about having to do the test at all.’
      • ‘In any event I was none too pleased that someone had defiled the book.’
      • ‘He was none too impressed when we decided it was time to come home for his sleep.’
      • ‘He is none too happy, but he grudgingly gives me the names.’
      • ‘My father was none too pleased that I was driving all the way to St. Louis.’
      • ‘I looked in the mirror and saw this crumpled old face peering back at me, dishevelled, none too clean, and in desperate need of a shave.’
      • ‘This episode was filmed in the height of summer and Darren was none too happy about wearing his full uniform.’

Origin

Old English, stressed form of to, spelled too from the 16th century.

Pronunciation

too

/tu//to͞o/