Definition of toad in English:

toad

noun

  • 1A tailless amphibian with a short stout body and short legs, typically having dry warty skin that can exude poison.

    • ‘The sudden arrival of warm wet weather caused a mass night-time migration of frogs, newts and toads to deluge the centre in Barnes.’
    • ‘The skins of some species of frogs and toads secrete an extraordinary array of defensive chemicals when the animals are seized by predators.’
    • ‘Some amphibians we know today include frogs, toads, newts and salamanders.’
    • ‘The loam of the junkyard was rich and fertile, streaming with healthy earthworms, mole crickets, and warty toads camouflaged against the ground.’
    • ‘The marsh supports American toads, midland painted turtles, Blanding's turtles, snapping turtles, and Lake Erie water snakes.’
    • ‘Amphibians such as frogs, toads, and salamanders are undergoing rapid population declines, most likely due to fungal disease, climate change, habitat loss, and pollution.’
    • ‘The Toad Party was against cruelty to all amphibians - particularly toads - but behind the humour was a serious message of care for the environment.’
    • ‘There are newts, toads, frogs and fish - all of which birds feed on.’
    • ‘There are seven categories of fish, including the basking shark, and the same number of amphibians and reptiles such as turtles, toads, lizards and newts.’
    • ‘But, because the liver is missing and there's a hole in the toad's body, the blood vessels and lungs burst and the other organs ooze out, he said.’
    • ‘At least 10 of the 16 original species of amphibians (frogs, toads and salamanders) survived the eruption.’
    • ‘Surrey County Council is leap-frogging into action ready for the annual migration of frogs, toads and newts to their breeding grounds for spawning which takes place from late February to May.’
    • ‘Cane toads are poisonous, ugly-looking large toads that are a major problem in parts of Australia.’
    • ‘The familiar frogs, toads, and salamanders have been present since at least the Jurassic Period.’
    • ‘Richard and volunteers spent two frantic evenings running up and down the road helping newts, toads and frogs cross the road, fishing them out of drains and covering up the grids.’
    • ‘Fortunately, though, the virus has not proved to be as harmful to salamanders as B. dendrobatidis has been to frogs and toads.’
    • ‘As with other toads their skin has a somewhat warty appearance but the distinguishing feature is a dark bar across the head behind the eyes.’
    • ‘The recent warm but wet weather has caused a mass migration of frogs, newts and toads to the Barnes Wetland Centre.’
    • ‘Dutch police in Leeuwarden are trying to find out if drug addicts raided a pet shop and stole three exotic toads whose warty skin is said to induce hallucinations when licked.’
    • ‘A similar story can be told for several other species of toads, frogs, salamanders, alligators, and turtles around the world.’
  • 2A contemptible or detestable person (used as a general term of abuse)

    ‘you're an arrogant little toad’
    • ‘No, Joe, you sniveling toad whose pathetic job it is to lie for other liars.’
    • ‘This snivelling little toad said with utter contempt in his voice, ‘Oh sure the French have culture.’’
    • ‘Totally avoid toads like him, and look for a crush who respects girls in general - and you in particular!’
    wretch
    beast, pig, swine, rat, creep, bastard, louse, snake, skunk, dog, weasel, lowlife, scumbag, heel, stinkpot, stinker, bad lot, no-good, son of a bitch, s.o.b., nasty piece of work
    scrote
    spalpeen
    rat fink, fink, schmuck
    dingo
    kuri
    rass
    rotter, hound, bounder, cad, blighter
    shit, sod, prick
    blackguard, dastard, knave, varlet, whoreson
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English tādde, tāda, abbreviation of tādige, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

toad

/tōd/