Definition of tiny in English:

tiny

adjective

  • Very small.

    ‘a tiny hummingbird’
    • ‘The instinctive lure of this tiny jewel of land would unerringly bring them back.’
    • ‘The soft tissues under the skin are full of tiny blood vessels called capillaries.’
    • ‘They want to justify creaming off a tiny minority into the top first class institutions.’
    • ‘If they do then it will revolutionise ideas about how much tiny babies can learn.’
    • ‘The couple are planning to deck the hallway ceiling with hundreds of tiny lights.’
    • ‘The few short frames of that tiny figure in an anorak being led by the hand to his death have become iconic.’
    • ‘He's painstakingly twisting tiny hoops of iron wire together to form a shirt of mail.’
    • ‘Saffron is made up of tiny filaments that are the dried pollen stigmas of the saffron flower.’
    • ‘Is this absence of black some kind of sad rebellion being staged within my tiny mind?’
    • ‘They are only up to five millimetres long and burrow into the silt in tiny pods.’
    • ‘At the time we were doing this small tour of tiny venues around the UK for hardcore fans.’
    • ‘Pollen is dust gathered by bees from stamens and collected from the hives as tiny pellets.’
    • ‘In different times, we would have known nothing about the tragedy of these tiny lives.’
    • ‘Why do we spend so much on things that give us tiny increases in comfort at the expense of so many other people?’
    • ‘We can live crowded together in vast cities or as tiny groups in remote deserts.’
    • ‘The railways may be in turmoil, but business is booming for one tiny bus and coach company.’
    • ‘The end result is that a tiny minority is allowed to lay claim to public opinion.’
    • ‘All along the river bed, women have dug down and spend hours scooping up water from tiny pools.’
    • ‘This was to be exchanged after six weeks for the coveted, customising tiny diamond.’
    • ‘On one wall there are tiny marks where in the past someone pinned up a picture.’
    minute, small-scale, scaled-down, mini, baby, toy, pocket, fun-size, petite, dwarfish, knee-high, miniature, minuscule, microscopic, nanoscopic, infinitesimal, micro, diminutive, pocket-sized, reduced, lilliputian
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: extension of obsolete tine, ‘small, diminutive’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tiny

/ˈtīnē//ˈtaɪni/