Definition of tinge in English:

tinge

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Color slightly.

    ‘a mass of white blossom tinged with pink’
    [with object and complement] ‘toward the sun the sky was tinged crimson’
    • ‘She had a huge grin on her face, and it was slightly tinged with red’
    • ‘The light was already tinged with red, coating everything it touched with the colour.’
    • ‘The sky had become a dark shade of indigo, tinged with the remnants of deep magenta.’
    • ‘A sheepish flush tinged my cheeks and Diego mumbled something in rapid Spanish about the sister he never had.’
    • ‘The sky was a pale orange colour now, orange tinged with red and thin lines of violet accentuated by an even darker orange.’
    • ‘Usually they are simply a piece of baguette topped with a disc of chèvre, grilled until it is tinged with golden brown and the cheese begins to run, then placed on a well-dressed salad.’
    • ‘Others are veiled in shadow and tinged by a yellow-orange tint.’
    • ‘Where Jack's face was weathered from the salt air, Eliza's skin was barely touched by the sun and her hair was lightly tinged with blond.’
    • ‘The sky was tinged with different shades of purple, red, and orange.’
    • ‘I don't remember Michael responding to him; but then pretty quickly things went an intense white colour, cold and tinged with blue, then dark for a fair old time.’
    • ‘Maples, the plant prized above all others for autumn colour, were merely tinged red as opposed to offering the blaze of scarlets and crimsons one would expect at this time of year.’
    • ‘Its general colouring is white tinged with rosy blush and it has two long red shaft tail streamers.’
    • ‘A band of light washed over the path, tingeing it a bluish grey.’
    • ‘Lee closed his mouth, his cheeks tinged a light shade of crimson.’
    • ‘His face was slightly tinged with color and his eyes had narrowed to slits.’
    • ‘He noted that her face was tinged with green and she swayed slightly.’
    tint, colour, dye, stain, shade, suffuse, flush, imbue, wash, overlay, bathe, saturate, steep, impregnate, permeate, penetrate, pervade, run through
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Have a slight influence on; imbue slightly with a feeling or quality.
      ‘this visit will be tinged with sadness’
      • ‘We connect with his struggling painter because Cotten always had an everyman quality to his work, yet one usually tinged with a degree of weariness.’
      • ‘A sense of girlish fantasy and romance underlies these works, one that is tinged with sickness and mortality as well as that creepy airlessness which Todd has made her own.’
      • ‘It was a big relief to qualify for the British Olympic team at the trials in Manchester on Saturday, although it was tinged with a touch of disappointment.’
      • ‘The Newmarket museum does have plans to expand, but the only hope for rivalling Louisville is the developing heritage centre at Aintree, which at least is tinged with the magic of the Grand National.’
      • ‘Sometimes conflict was tinged with a political colouring: Jacobitism or Jacobinism.’
      • ‘Its news is increasingly tinged by the corrosive liberal bias that permeates so much of the global media.’
      • ‘I'd finally achieved the acceptance I longed for-but it was tinged with the bitterness of how much of myself I'd given up in the process.’
      • ‘The question was tinged with a touch of sarcasm that made her embarrassed flush renew its bright shade and caused her to clench her fists.’
      • ‘After that each brief exchange of pleasantries was tinged with accidental double entendres, and what Alan Bennett refers to as ‘a somewhat redundant intimacy’.’
      • ‘When you walk into a home where the air is tinged with aromatic spices and sweet smelling delicacies, your mouth waters and you feel an insatiable hunger.’
      • ‘Elvis lives with his unemployed, alcoholic father in a swampland slum where even a trip to the local watering hole is tinged with danger.’
      • ‘Whether tinged with fruity aromas or floral hops, the dry quality of these Abbey beers and strong ales is an ideal way to wake up the palate and promotes the appetite.’
      • ‘Schytte's Op. 28 is a truly wonderful piece full of romantic passion tinged with the occasional nostalgic shade.’
      • ‘And the sadness in his music isn't tinged with bitterness.’
      • ‘The views of the objectors are obviously tinged with disappointment but should not be dismissed as sour grapes.’
      • ‘Although the recent reunion in Ballinagree proved a joyous occasion filled with more than a few surprises, it was still tinged with sadness due to the absence of one family member.’
      • ‘Their demands are not just a measure of necessity but are tinged with the same greed which permeates association football across the water.’
      • ‘But their happy family life is tinged with sadness when they remember their son Ian and grandson John who both died of leukaemia after being diagnosed whilst very young children.’
      • ‘But the movement is also tinged with a dark side.’
      • ‘When I came across this page of disclaimer stickers for science textbooks, I had to laugh, although my laughter is heavily tinged with incredulity.’

noun

  • 1A tendency toward or trace of some color.

    ‘there was a faint pink tinge to the sky’
    • ‘Still, I suppress the slight tinge of red, for my curiosity has far outweighed my irritation.’
    • ‘The last of Mr Darcy's lingering doubts faded as he saw her cheeks flush in the pink tinge of a blush.’
    • ‘The object made no noise, moved quickly, was ‘luminous’ green/yellow, and I noticed slight pinkish tinges around the edges.’
    • ‘The bright blue sky had a pink tinge to it and the sun was hanging low in the sky.’
    • ‘On impulse, she leaned over and placed a chaste kiss on his cheek and was smug to see a slight tinge of red creep over his cheeks.’
    • ‘The rim (where the wine meets the glass, remember?) is translucent again with only a slight tinge of green.’
    • ‘He looked at me, his cheeks holding slight tinges of crimson.’
    • ‘It is often said that the elusive Ouse bream are more likely to make a rare appearance when there is an extra tinge of colour to the water.’
    • ‘Unlike the stuffed one I saw originally, which had yellowed with age, the Nile Perch is silver in colour with a blue tinge.’
    • ‘By the time the group had finished swimming, Casey's digits looked like shrivelled prunes and her skin had turned a slight tinge of white.’
    • ‘She had astonishing green eyes that had a slight tinge of blue.’
    • ‘The approaching dawn stroked the bellies of the clouds in the eastern sky with tinges of salmon pink but hadn't yet touched the hills or roofs of the town.’
    • ‘With oats, the straw would have a slight tinge of green so that, hopefully, it would have a higher feeding value and also be more palatable.’
    • ‘Reports from pleasure anglers suggest that the fish are still feeding and with recent rains adding a tinge of much needed colour to the otherwise clear water prospects look good.’
    • ‘He had blond-hair with a slight tinge of red and bright cobalt blue eyes that took her breath away.’
    • ‘The perfect omelette is pale golden on the outside without the slightest tinge of brown, and soft and creamy in the centre, which the French term bauvese.’
    • ‘Lifting up the sleeve of my kimono, I pointed at the white bandages still wrapped around my arm, which still had faint tinges of pink to it.’
    • ‘He was looking away, his cheeks flushed with a tinge of pink.’
    • ‘The Ouse has been at a steady level for most of the week and still carries a tinge of colour and flow.’
    • ‘Where white is fresh and crisp and bright, cream has just a slight tinge of yellowish brown stirred in, softening the harshness that's often seen in pure white.’
    tint, colour, shade, tone, hue, tincture, cast, flush, blush
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A slight trace of a feeling or quality.
      • ‘He could not help but feel the slightest tinge of frustration.’
      • ‘If there was the slightest tinge of sarcasm, I missed it.’
      • ‘I still felt a slight tinge whenever someone said that to me.’
      • ‘It was then that I noticed her slight tinge of a Welsh accent.’
      • ‘A slight tinge of panic had crept back into his voice.’
      • ‘Sitting behind a computer, any shy or docile human being can become the world's nastiest bastard of a hacker without even the slightest tinge of regret.’
      • ‘We like to think that we write deep, scholarly, researched works, and that ‘journalism’ has a slight tinge of the superficial about it.’
      • ‘Though, as often, this fine stoicism has a slight tinge of the press-release, his grateful admirers can only agree.’
      • ‘I didn't feel the slightest tinge of remorse as I noticed the blonde hair swishing behind a tainted wall.’
      • ‘He tried to keep his face stone, has he had during the battle, but a slight tinge of compassion bordered his eyes.’
      • ‘He corrected himself with a slight tinge of remorse.’
      • ‘Chase leaned back on the backrest of the dark brown wooden bench and rested his arms over it because of a slight tinge of exhaustion.’
      • ‘She felt a slight tinge of defeat but then turned to see that over half her studio was cheering on the sidelines.’
      • ‘It is this core belief that also gives his Superman a slight swagger and a tinge of arrogance, but also makes for a performance of surprising depth.’
      • ‘Although I feel a slight tinge of anxiety and apprehension in the air that surrounds you, it's greatly masked by the strength of your confidence.’
      • ‘It took another moment for her to answer, and when she did, her voice held the slightest tinge of anger.’
      • ‘She was thinking twice now… with the slightest tinge of regret.’
      • ‘He smelt of clean clothes and soap, with just the slightest tinge of oil paint.’
      • ‘He even provides the film with a slight tinge of laid-back silly humour at times.’
      • ‘Ok, so I did something which to me is hilarious, but at the same time I have a slight tinge of guilt for doing it, because its misleading.’

Origin

Late 15th century: from Latin tingere to dip or color The noun dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation:

tinge

/tinj/