Main definitions of tiller in English

: tiller1tiller2tiller3

tiller1

noun

  • A horizontal bar fitted to the head of a boat's rudder post and used as a lever for steering.

    • ‘There's the main sheet (the rope which controls the main sail), the tiller (the steering stick), the jib (the front sail) and a lot more coloured rope.’
    • ‘She glanced to the aft, where the Captain stood, one hand on the tiller, the other holding a spyglass to his eye.’
    • ‘The tiller can be easily removed to allow more useable space for entertaining while dockside or at anchor.’
    • ‘A succinct and authoritative commentary on handling the tiller and self-balancing side rudder of such ships was given by Shetelig and Falk in 1937.’
    • ‘The sailors below went about their morning duties; checking the tiller, adjusting the sails, tightening the riggings.’
    • ‘With one hand on the tiller, she navigated her way into clear blue waters.’
    • ‘She quickly got dressed and made her way up to the deck, going to grasp the tiller happily.’
    • ‘A firm hand at the tiller and the boat sails fair.’
    • ‘Firmly he pushed the tiller away from him and steered the boat into the wind.’
    • ‘He grabbed the tiller and turned the boat towards the Tradewind.’
    • ‘The comparison is done many times each second with any deviation resulting in a correcting movement of the tiller or the wheel.’
    • ‘Steered with a tiller, Cayuga maxed out at six knots, well under the Canal's 10-mph speed limit.’
    • ‘Christopher takes the decision to stop sailing, lashing the tiller to the same side as the reefed mainsail.’
    • ‘The ship's tiller was on an elevated platform that could only be reached by a polished set of crystalline stairs.’
    • ‘They don't have rudders or tillers or handles or anything with which you might steer.’
    • ‘It is very much like turning the tiller on a boat to deflect the wake on the boat and alter its course.’
    • ‘For steering, there was, surprisingly, a long tiller, aft on the upper deck.’
    • ‘To minimize maintenance, the only wood used in the entire boat is the tiller and the only opening to the area below deck is the companionway.’
    • ‘I let him sort out the rudder and tiller, as we're late, and he's starting to worry.’
    • ‘It was through these tunnels Taffle brought the boat, deftly maneuvering the tiller.’
    tiller, wheel
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French telier weaver's beam, stock of a crossbow from medieval Latin telarium, from Latin tela web.

Pronunciation:

tiller

/ˈtilər/

Main definitions of tiller in English

: tiller1tiller2tiller3

tiller2

noun

  • An implement or machine for breaking up soil; a plow or cultivator.

    • ‘Without so much as a garden tiller, some enterprising farmers earned $238,000 in one year raising baby, organic salad greens - on half an acre!’
    • ‘Papa would borrow a tiller from a friend and plow up the patch making room for two rows of twelve plants each.’
    • ‘One of the disadvantages to using tillers is that they damage the soil structure.’
    • ‘Cultivating especially with a plow or tiller churns the soil.’
    • ‘Use the low gear when operating a heavy tiller in loose soil or on a slope.’
    • ‘If I can make it, I shall return tonight and have the tiller fixed by morning.’
    • ‘The company would offer a discount to farmers who buy tillers under this scheme.’
    • ‘Making two or more passes with the tiller helps blend the compost with the topsoil and break up any clumps of material.’
    • ‘The tiller will break up the ground and get it ready for planting, chop up any debris, and help mix in fertilizer and compost.’
    • ‘Many garden tillers have sickle bar mower attachments available.’
    • ‘If your garden is large, a rotary tiller or cultivator with wheels is the most practical method of removing weeds from your garden.’
    • ‘This could not be accomplished with a tiller; we used a backhoe to get the job done.’
    • ‘You can drive over it without damage, just as long as you straddle any fittings and raise implements such as mowers and garden tillers.’
    • ‘If you're just starting your garden this spring, turn the top 8 to 12 inches of the soil using a rotary tiller.’
    • ‘If you have a 20-percent stand, why start over and destroy what you have by using a tiller or power rake to prepare the soil?’
    • ‘Down behind our house my father maintained a vegetable garden which, the main growing season having ended, he had been plowing under with his tiller for a couple of days.’
    • ‘Use a spading fork to break up hard ground, then follow with a tiller to incorporate the organic matter.’
    • ‘A New Mexico farmer accidentally hits a cow with his tiller.’

Pronunciation:

tiller

/ˈtilər/

Main definitions of tiller in English

: tiller1tiller2tiller3

tiller3

noun

  • A lateral shoot from the base of the stem, especially in a grass or cereal.

    • ‘Throughout the growing season, marked plants increased in the numbers of tillers, leaves and in total plant length.’
    • ‘The tip height above the soil surface of elongating leaves, number of leaves on the main tiller and number of tillers per plant were observed every other day.’
    • ‘The presence of the endophyte in tillers and leaves was tested in infected plants as well as its absence in non-infected plants.’
    • ‘Three similar branches, shoots or tillers per plant were selected for the three treatments.’
    • ‘The number of leaves, tillers and plant length was initially recorded upon marking and was periodically recorded after that for a total of 3-5 observations per plant.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]usually as noun tillering
  • Develop tillers.

    • ‘Even though a thin wheat stand will tiller in the spring and fill in, a heavier plant density is less attractive to chinch bugs when they move into wheat in early April.’
    • ‘Top stemmy swards and apply nitrogen to promote tillering.’
    • ‘Under non-limiting growth conditions, tillering continues for an indefinite time with uneven maturation as a result (not shown here).’
    • ‘Adequate phosphorus is required for early plant development and tillering.’
    • ‘It should be applied shortly after the downy brome emerges and before it tillers in the fall.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (denoting a sapling arising from the stool of a felled tree): apparently based on Old English telga bough of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

tiller

/ˈtilər/