Definition of thwart in English:

thwart

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Prevent (someone) from accomplishing something.

    ‘he never did anything to thwart his father’
    ‘he was thwarted in his desire to punish Uncle Fred’
    • ‘Life as a spy is all glamour - women, alcohol, jetting around the globe for two hours before finally thwarting the enemy in the last ten minutes.’
    • ‘Assume, for a moment, that the French and the Germans aren't thwarting us out of pique, but by design, long-term design.’
    • ‘But he was thwarted after a female worker reached forward and closed the till before he could snatch any cash.’
    • ‘And they succeeded as Garner's final save thwarted Lee Canoville in the closing seconds.’
    • ‘We are going to be using those same people to thwart him.’
    • ‘This has frustrated the restaurant entrepreneur somewhat and thwarted him from rolling out more establishments.’
    • ‘York played on the break and came closest to breaking the deadlock when Carter was thwarted by an excellent save.’
    • ‘Although stardom beckoned at an early age, Michael was initially thwarted in his desire to act.’
    • ‘That case hinged on an interpretation of the Hobbs act, a 1946 law aimed at thwarting gangsters from extorting interstate truckers.’
    • ‘But he was thwarted when he tried to do the same at last year's London Marathon.’
    • ‘My previous scheme was to auction off a date with me to this event on EBay, but now I am thwarted.’
    • ‘It seems obvious that a greater police presence in that neighborhood might thwart some criminals and inadvertently save lives.’
    • ‘His mother thwarted him, calling into a local bank in June to tell the manager that her son's stories were lies.’
    • ‘Built into the Constitution is the notion that a free people should thwart its leaders if necessary.’
    • ‘Distraction thieves were thwarted by a number of elderly people they targeted in Pewsey late on Wednesday evening last week.’
    • ‘One way to thwart such unscrupulous people is for the bona fide seed companies to make their presences felt at every level in the country.’
    • ‘The little man with the gloves and short sleeves had no sooner orchestrated something at one end than he was thwarting his opponents at the other.’
    • ‘Will Eliza find the courage to thwart these evil people and restore balance to the African wild?’
    • ‘And, when I'm thwarted, I'm likely to go all sour and spiky and be a pig to live with.’
    • ‘Did things happen to thwart people from voting?’
    1. 1.1 Oppose (a plan, attempt, or ambition) successfully.
      ‘the government had been able to thwart all attempts by opposition leaders to form new parties’
      • ‘The story revolves round the locals’ attempts to thwart the plan.’
      • ‘Given the manner in which the development of Sligo has been stifled by sectional interest, it is hoped that the same dead hand of greed does not thwart the plans of the harbour board.’
      • ‘Esther is a Jewish girl who becomes Queen to King Xerxes of Persia, and through her bravery, is able to thwart an attempt to slaughter all the Jews living in Persia at that time.’
      • ‘Fortunately I am a light sleeper, so I should be able to thwart any attempts to slice bits off me for a tasty midnight snack.’
      • ‘However, thanks to smuggling, piracy, and trade with the New World, England was able to thwart Napoleon's plan.’
      • ‘Jr. will wake up and make every effort to thwart your plans.’
      • ‘The drop-off reflects deep disappointment that clerical establishment rulers have been able to largely thwart Khatami's efforts.’
      • ‘The record labels have attempted to thwart the efforts of free music providers through the creation of copyright-protected files and through lawsuits against providers of free music.’
      • ‘They say that the steps taken by Mr. LeBlanc were taken by him, deliberately and with ill intent, in an attempt to thwart their efforts to have their motions heard.’
      • ‘The pair will be able to use their stake to thwart any takeover attempt.’
      • ‘But this instrument also has its limitations, chief of which is that the type of very specific, tactical intelligence required to thwart terrorist plots is rare.’
      • ‘But it can be said that police and intelligence work is disrupting the terrorist networks and thwarting their plans.’
      • ‘Also his best laid plans were thwarted when he attempted to return to see his family in South Africa.’
      • ‘So far we have been successful in thwarting the efforts of Representative Bill Thomas (R - CA) to get this passed.’
      • ‘In their relationships with women, Russell and Ayer both seemed quite oblivious to the feelings of others when such feelings were likely to thwart their plans or ambitions.’
      • ‘However, Knottingley were able to thwart most efforts to break the deadlock with some resolute defence.’
      • ‘We wouldn't want to do anything to thwart the Campbell government's quest for the privatization of health care.’
      • ‘Officials mustered a security force of thousands in the area around the hall, part of an effort to thwart any attempt at a repeat attack.’
      • ‘For years they have provided a power base for him - realising he still clings to the vainglorious Brussels dream, while the Chancellor thwarts his ambition.’
      • ‘We all know who these people are, they walk among us every day and attempt to thwart carefully laid plans of anti-productivity with thoughts of ambition and determination.’
      foil, frustrate, baulk, stand in the way of, forestall
      View synonyms

noun

  • A structural crosspiece sometimes forming a seat for a rower in a boat.

    • ‘Her hull is painted white with blue trim on the thwarts.’
    • ‘The placement of the primary thwart is important to balance.’
    • ‘Thirteen oarsmen and a captain form the crew of the fixed-thwart rowing boats that participate in the competitions.’
    • ‘Braced against the thwart, I hang my paddle far over the left gunwale and suck the stern toward it, and the edge of the table rock whisks by our port side.’
    • ‘With your legs facing forward, the leeboard thwart goes approximately over your knees.’
    • ‘More important than the tilt of the oarlocks are the relative positions of the thwart (seat), the oarlocks and the footbrace.’

preposition & adverb

literary, archaic
  • From one side to another side of; across.

    as preposition ‘a pink-tinged cloud spread thwart the shore’
    • ‘Lay them thwart, that the top of one may rest on the root or stub of the other.’

Origin

Middle English thwerte, from the adjective thwert ‘perverse, obstinate, adverse’, from Old Norse thvert, neuter of thverr ‘transverse’, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin torquere ‘to twist’.

Pronunciation

thwart

/THwôrt//θwɔrt/