Definition of thurifer in US English:

thurifer

noun

  • An acolyte carrying a censer.

    • ‘The celebrant and thurifer must have been trained by baton-twirling majorettes, as they were of the school that likes to rotate the thurible through 360 degrees!’
    • ‘Our Acolytes range in age from 7 to 70 and serve as crucifers, torch-bearers, thurifers, vergers and other roles to help make our worship experience complete.’
    • ‘If necessary the number may be reduced to only two torchbearers and thurifer, or even just the thurifer alone.’
    • ‘Acolytes are asked to serve one Sunday a month as torch bearers, crucifers, book holders, thurifers and servers.’
    • ‘Often during Mass the thurifer swings the censer to incense the congregation, and sometimes that makes me so mad.’
    • ‘Then the thurifer might cense others around the altar - in groups - and then the rest of the congregations.’
    • ‘The thurifer helps to engage all of our senses in prayer, heightening the solemnity of the liturgy.’
    • ‘Acolytes serve at the altar as sub deacons and servers, crucifers, thurifers, torchbearers and lectors.’
    • ‘Clouds of incense led the procession with the thurifer swinging full circles and figure eights.’
    • ‘One ascends the altar, leaving the others swinging their thurifers at its foot - hands his to the officiant and retires.’
    • ‘The thurifer processes directly in front of the crucifer and behind the verger, if the verger is processing.’
    • ‘The procession is led by the crucifer, lucifers and thurifer followed by the priest bearing the Blessed Sacrament.’
    • ‘In procession, the thurifer swings the thurible at full length from his right hand.’
    • ‘The two thurifers should be assisted by a boat bearer during the procession.’
    • ‘There is not a thurifer in the country who has not at some time created the world's finest incense only to mislay the formula and then forget how they made it.’
    • ‘Perhaps it is for the thurifer alone to bow to them, out of silent respect for the mystery of Christ present in his body gathered.’
    • ‘It was, and still is, customary for the thurifer then to incense the people in parochial churches.’
    • ‘If our contemporary thurifer had been a 1950s’ basketball player, my old Irish pastor would have benched him for being a hot dog.’
    • ‘The thurifer carries the thurible and boat when incense is used at the Eucharist or other celebrations.’
    • ‘The thurifers stand, genuflect, and carry the thurible and incense into the sacristy.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from late Latin, from Latin thus, thur- ‘incense’ (from Greek thuos ‘sacrifice’) + -fer ‘-bearing’.

Pronunciation

thurifer

/ˈθʊrəfər//ˈTHo͝orəfər/