Definition of thudding in English:



  • The action of moving, falling, or striking something with a dull, heavy sound.

    ‘he heard the hollow thudding of hooves’
    • ‘Her ears picked up the sound of a soft rustle, and then beneath it, the quiet steady thudding of cushioned weight hitting the ground.’
    • ‘We picked up our pace as the thudding of heavy boots hitting the pavement reached our ears.’
    • ‘The distant thudding of sound systems is drowned in an eerie silence.’
    • ‘Ben heard the soft-shoed thudding of the houseservant reacting to the demand.’
    • ‘Despite the thudding of basketballs and sneakers, the cheers of the participants and not so distant sounds of traffic on a highway, Tom found it all to be upsettingly quiet.’
    • ‘There was a loud, thudding sound from somewhere out of sight, and the man turned toward its source.’
    • ‘At first it was a muffled sound, slowly it became louder and louder till the dull thudding of footsteps was clearly heard from the hall outside.’
    • ‘And then, over the rustling her legs made in the grass, she heard a faint crackling, thudding noise.’
    • ‘What is that loud thudding coming from next door?’
    • ‘An erratic thudding that I soon recognized as my own heartbeat echoed in my ears at the sight.’
    • ‘Then, as the car approaches, the slow thudding changes to a punctuated boom-boom-boom.’


  • [attributive] Used to emphasize the clumsiness or awkwardness of something, especially a remark.

    ‘great thudding conversation-stoppers’
    • ‘A reprieve from the thudding interactions was a monologue by the Australian dancer Grayson Millwood.’
    • ‘Miller wrote the screenplay as well, so the thudding obviousness of stuff like that can only rest on her shoulders.’
    • ‘You can make a lot of thudding assertions like that, but it doesn't make them true.’
    • ‘The thudding old-fashioned screenplay abounds with hearty slogans and mild avian puns mouthed by shopworn British stereotypes.’