Definition of throw good money after bad in US English:

throw good money after bad

phrase

  • Incur further loss in a hopeless attempt to recoup a previous loss.

    • ‘Our manufacturers are getting less competitive all the time and the fact that you now want us to subsidise them even further is a classic case of throwing good money after bad.’
    • ‘In Scotland, where the higher spend has not so far resulted in the hoped-for Great Leap Forward, the fear is that in shelling out even more, taxpayers will indeed be throwing good money after bad, with no guarantee of improvements.’
    • ‘The political reality is such that we may have to await a point where the legal and other costs mount enough for somebody to start arguing that it is time to stop throwing good money after bad.’
    • ‘And after two years of losses, some investors are unwilling to throw good money after bad.’
    • ‘The public need to become much more aware that they could be throwing good money after bad if they buy these plots.’
    • ‘People have put money into it in the past and they have sometimes felt like they are throwing good money after bad.’
    • ‘The alternative is to go on throwing good money after bad, and that's not a sensible policy.’
    • ‘If it was me I would have thought from the very beginning that it was simply throwing good money after bad.’
    • ‘These businesses will struggle on, until their bankers or their owners become fed up of throwing good money after bad.’
    • ‘Most experts advise people against topping up their endowments, as this is seen as throwing good money after bad.’