Definition of thrill in English:

thrill

noun

  • 1A sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure.

    ‘the thrill of jumping out of an airplane’
    • ‘Three enterprising Killorglin students were treated to the thrill of a lifetime last Wednesday thanks to generous business tycoon Bill Cullen.’
    • ‘They were delighted someone they knew had won the award, and no doubt their excitement gave Rhonda a thrill too.’
    • ‘We receive just the right amount of thrills and whiteknuckled excitement, and enough time in between to enjoy the scenery and laugh and have a great time.’
    • ‘Even when it came, the first 0-0 draw of the World Cup between world champions France and Uruguay, was full of thrills, drama and excitement.’
    • ‘For the growing tribe of philatelists in the city, stamp collection provides a window to the world with all the thrills and pleasures of an educative and fascinating hobby.’
    • ‘The school team served up some excellent displays of football and provided their supporters with lots of thrills and excitement.’
    • ‘He felt the thrill and excitement tingle up his back and he gave a small shiver, stepping closer to her.’
    • ‘He has brought with him a support team of 60 people as well as props that fill seven trucks, Gallup promised Chinese audiences two hours of excitement and thrills.’
    • ‘For though it's a challenge, it's a rewarding one, and the thrill and pleasure of coasting down the other side more than makes up for the hour spent pedalling in earnest to reach the peak.’
    • ‘I can honestly say that I felt a little thrill of excitement.’
    • ‘I felt a thrill of excitement as I floated weightless, suspended over the void.’
    • ‘The third match between India and Sri Lanka in the aiwa Cup gave all these thrills, excitement and jubilation, to millions of cricket fans all over the world.’
    • ‘I still recall with delight the thrill of watching him learn to scoot around on the floor.’
    • ‘But what of the thrills and heart-pounding excitement that were so much a part of her days in the player's game?’
    • ‘Listening to good English can provide a real thrill of pleasure.’
    • ‘It was a call that sent a thrill of genuine excitement down the spine of every weary hack sitting there wondering whether the post-election day was ever going to end.’
    • ‘The brooding, slow-building suspense of the Japanese original, Ring, has been replaced with cheap thrills that make you jump not because they're actually scary but because they come as a surprise.’
    • ‘‘She was quite prepared to look to the defendant for excitement and sexual thrills,’ said Judge Stokes.’
    • ‘The thought sent a delightful thrill through her, making her loins tingle with an anticipation of shared pleasure.’
    • ‘The sheer thrill and enjoyment they took from the game is something that will live with me.’
    excitement, feeling of excitement, thrilling experience, stimulation, sensation, glow, tingle, titillation
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    1. 1.1 An experience that produces a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure.
      ‘to ride a winner is always a thrill’
      • ‘That experience was a thrill for me, especially when he commented that I caught on rather quickly to things that had taken him most of his childhood to master.’
      • ‘The thrill and sheer experience of Rome is very distinctive and unique.’
      • ‘TWO days of sporting thrills will kick off in Bolton tomorrow morning with the start of the Greater Manchester Youth Games.’
      • ‘It was kind of a thrill to ride the wave of negativity that 800 people can generate.’
      • ‘Tell us, do you seek the thrill rides at the amusement park or is the carousel more your speed?’
      • ‘The fight hadn't solved any problems, but its continued existence, a familiar sensation from my former life, was a thrill.’
      • ‘It would also be a thrill to hear that squall of feedback at every public occasion where a national anthem is required.’
      • ‘Listening to Scott's deep pride and simple joy as she described her Olympic experience was a thrill.’
      • ‘So it was a thrill to hear from Jed, who'd come across my name on the Web and wanted to get in touch.’
      • ‘I mean, it's usually a thrill to hear what readers think, and to see that I've made some connection across the ether.’
      • ‘But again, the biggest thrill of my day is surfing great waves in Baja in places that I've helped save.’
      • ‘As an author, it was a thrill to create emotion in an audience.’
      • ‘They were a family like us doing something that families like us do: enjoying the thrill of fleeing the spray from the big waves that break against the sea wall in stormy conditions.’
    2. 1.2 A wave or nervous tremor of emotion or sensation.
      ‘a thrill of excitement ran through her’
      • ‘Many people practice this type of exhibitionism to get a thrill or a rush from it.’
      • ‘But most of all I'm getting thrills of emotions that I haven't felt for such a long time, that I'd almost forgotten.’
      • ‘At points it hugs the very edge of the rim, giving me a nervous thrill.’
      • ‘A familiar thrill rushed through me as I took everything in.’
      • ‘The game delivers an exhilarating thrill ride down huge wave faces and into barreling tubes, allowing gamers to pull off unbelievable moves.’
      • ‘The emphasis of her words doesn't escape Jem, and he suddenly feels a thrill of nervousness.’
      • ‘These people don't come to the Dales to enjoy the scenery, since they don't linger long enough to enjoy it; they just come for cheap thrills and adrenaline rushes.’
      • ‘‘He is just the right height for me,’ she thought, feeling a thrill of happiness surging through her.’
      • ‘He grins as his body trembles with the thrill of true fear, the first he's felt since he faced the Masks.’
      • ‘This detected the sensation of thrill through real-time sampling and analysis of physiological reactions.’
      • ‘Hikari knew the striking thrill of emotion before she could even think about it.’
      • ‘When he gently squeezed her left arm, the electric thrill surged through her again, just as strongly as before.’
      • ‘Her body ached sweetly with the memories of the previous night's dream and the sensation of the sheets brushing over her skin sent small thrills through her.’
      • ‘The thought of seeing him again causes a little thrill of nervousness.’
      • ‘The thrill starts with the phone call, then the nervous anticipation when you arrive, then that moment when, if she has a maid, the door opens and you see her for the first time.’
      • ‘It often takes a sensation to create a thrill or terror, to take us beyond simple awareness to a throbbingly self-conscious recognition of the new.’
      • ‘His lips moved up her neck in a light fashion and gave her an uncomfortable thrill such that she shuddered.’
      • ‘I felt an immense thrill rush, hoping he had finally taken a good look at my captor's feet.’
      • ‘Risk is not a necessary requirement for sensation-seeking, although it does intensify the thrill for a high sensation-seeker.’
      • ‘Without knowing it, he touched his cheek where her lips had been only moments before and felt a thrill rush through him.’
      tremor, wave, rush, surge, flash, flush, blaze, stab, dart, throb, tremble, quiver, flutter, shudder, vibration
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  • 2Medicine
    A vibratory movement or resonance heard through a stethoscope.

    • ‘This systolic thrill is associated with an ejection type murmur heard best over the pulmonary area.’
    • ‘All vital signs were within normal limits, and no precordial murmurs, friction rubs, or thrills were present.’
    • ‘Stenosis in the artery causes a swishing sound, which is heard as a bruit on auscultation and also may be felt as a thrill or slight vibration in the vessel on palpation.’
    • ‘A precordial thrill, machinery-like murmur, and right bundle branch block were noted.’
    • ‘An arteriovenous fistula of the left arm had a palpable thrill.’
    1. 2.1archaic A throb or pulsation.
      twinge, pang, ache, throb, spasm, cramp, dart, blaze, prick, flash, gnawing
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verb

  • 1with object Cause (someone) to have a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure.

    ‘his kiss thrilled and excited her’
    ‘they were thrilled with the results’
    ‘I'm thrilled to death’
    ‘they were thrilled to pieces’
    • ‘I picked up a catnip toy for Digger (there's a certain kind he really likes), and he was very thrilled with it.’
    • ‘The couple are thrilled with their latest addition and so is their four-year-old son, Taylor, who has a companion to play with.’
    • ‘Commodore Robert Hughes was thrilled with the day's events, which he said had been ‘absolutely fantastic’.’
    • ‘His parents were thrilled to have Irene and Audrey for dinner.’
    • ‘She was absolutely thrilled with the win as was her family who have supported her all the way since she first began her athletics career 5 years ago.’
    • ‘Dylan didn't exactly look thrilled at the thought of being back in Michigan.’
    • ‘I answer all me fan mail personally and I believe in that, because I'm thrilled to bits.’
    • ‘I was thrilled to learn that I was going down to Brownsville, Texas.’
    • ‘He seemed genuinely thrilled to be back on the mound, even without a blazing fastball.’
    • ‘We could hear her crying, she was so thrilled to hear his voice.’
    • ‘"I'm genuinely thrilled by our prospects.’
    • ‘I can tell you that I am thrilled to death, no pun intended.’
    • ‘She said: ‘This is the first time I've owned my own place and I'm thrilled to bits.’’
    • ‘Our baby is due the first week of March, and we are thrilled beyond belief.’
    • ‘But you know, we're just thrilled with the success that the show has had.’
    • ‘They thrilled Canadian fans by winning the World Series in 1992 and 1993.’
    • ‘Overall, I'm not thrilled with any of the choices for 2008, but then I rarely am.’
    • ‘On Sunday The Thrills will be thrilling their fans with a spectacular live show.’
    • ‘Personally, I think our male audience is thrilled to see women who love video games.’
    • ‘For their part, the people were thrilled with their new Queen.’
    excite, stimulate, arouse, rouse, inspire, give joy to, delight, give pleasure to, stir, stir up, exhilarate, intoxicate, electrify, galvanize, move, motivate, fire, fire with enthusiasm, fire someone's imagination, fuel, brighten, animate, lift, quicken
    exciting, stirring, action-packed, rip-roaring, gripping, riveting, fascinating, dramatic, hair-raising, rousing, lively, animated, spirited, stimulating, moving, inspiring, inspirational, electrifying, passionate, impassioned, emotive, emotional, emotion-charged, heady, soul-stirring
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    1. 1.1no object Experience a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure.
      ‘thrill to the magic of the world's greatest guitarist’
      • ‘Scorsese today is still one of America's best film-makers, and he still makes films that we can thrill to and think about.’
      • ‘What urban child doesn't thrill to the idea of clear pools and islands, the cleanness, the space, the apparently ownerless wilderness that they can call their own?’
      • ‘I'm afraid I began to thrill to the prospect of her casting.’
      • ‘Contempt is a daring idea to build a character around, much less a whole movie, and you thrill to Norton's hyperactive rant, his attitude.’
      • ‘Moviegoers can thrill to a spinning top exploding in mid-air!’
      • ‘They'll still thrill to the action scenes and laugh at the jokes.’
      • ‘It's not that veeries are especially handsome thrushes, but I thrill to their song that rolls down the scale in an emphatic and ringing manner.’
      • ‘Rather, we thrill to the juxtaposition of four amazing actors trading turns as the literary lovers in their prime and autumnal years.’
      • ‘After all, everybody loves the bangs and it's a cold heart that won't thrill to their kaleidoscopic display.’
      • ‘The Creator gave me eyes and senses to thrill to the appeal of femininity.’
      • ‘Blood Money, however, has some of his best work - aficionados will thrill to a couple of tracks in particular.’
      • ‘Geologists will thrill to the revelation of the layers of limestone, shale and sandstone.’
      • ‘We thrill to their victories, commit their most heroic moments to memory, defend our favourite players with almost theological passion.’
      • ‘At a retail price of $32.99, the diehard Disney fanatic in your life will thrill to have this gem added their collection.’
      • ‘Gearheads will thrill to see racecars up close; lots of other activities are planned.’
      • ‘I thrill to the notion that someone is doing something More Important Than Weblogging.’
      • ‘We thrill to see athletic skill - abilities that most of us possess to a degree - raised to the utmost level.’
      • ‘The bagpipes are warpipes and those who thrill to them today are the inheritors of a warrior tradition.’
      • ‘The fantasy junkies who thrill to Lord of the Rings and role-play games form one obvious tribe.’
      • ‘As you read this special issue on Prisons, thrill to the fact that lives are being changed - in spite of their presence in prison cells.’
  • 2no object , with adverbial (of an emotion or sensation) pass with a nervous tremor.

    ‘the shock of alarm thrilled through her’
    • ‘He thrust the sheets back into the portfolio, and a strange feeling of pain thrilled through him.’
    • ‘As she watched his back disappear, an emotion thrilled up into her chest.’
    • ‘Exquisite pleasure thrilled through every nerve in my body.’
    1. 2.1literary no object Quiver or throb.
      be excited, feel excited, tingle, feel joy
      rush, race, surge, cascade, course, flood, flow, gush, wash, well up, sweep, flash, blaze, throb, quiver, shiver, flutter, shudder, vibrate
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Phrases

  • the thrill of the chase

    • Pleasure and excitement derived from seeking something desired, especially a sexual partner.

      ‘I was so lost in the thrill of the chase that I didn't realize we were entirely incompatible’
      • ‘India enjoy the thrill of the chase as chastened England head home’
      • ‘There's not what you could call a plethora of foxes round here, but you still have the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘Sportsmen, seeking the thrill of the chase, released rabbits, hares and foxes.’
      • ‘And no matter how much single people claim they want to live on their own (and fair enough if the only alternative is picking up the dirty pants of your sexually-hibernating cocoa partner) everyone loves the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘This way you could enjoy the thrill of the chase without the expense of owning a horse.’
      • ‘I think he enjoyed being successful and loved the thrill of the chase in business.’
      • ‘I've even heard them argue that the foxes actually, you know, quite like it, the thrill of the chase - until they're ripped to pieces.’
      • ‘They enjoy the pageantry, the horsemanship and the countryside. They relish the thrill of the chase, but stress that they derive pleasure from hunting, not killing.’
      • ‘Women want to revisit the passion and lust of a new physical relationship and enjoy the thrill of the chase.’
      • ‘Like the Antiques Roadshow, Reclaimers justifies itself as part bargain hunt - with all the thrill of the chase - and part history lesson.’
  • thrills and chills

    • informal Excitement and exhilaration, especially when derived from dangerous sports or entertainments.

      ‘audiences were in a mood for thrills and chills this weekend’

Origin

Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘pierce or penetrate’): alteration of dialect thirl ‘pierce’.

Pronunciation

thrill

/θrɪl//THril/