Definition of thermodynamics in English:

thermodynamics

plural noun

  • [treated as singular] The branch of physical science that deals with the relations between heat and other forms of energy (such as mechanical, electrical, or chemical energy), and, by extension, of the relationships between all forms of energy.

    • ‘Most physicists probably learned about the laws of thermodynamics at high school, but few of us will have been told the whole story.’
    • ‘He now worked on thermodynamics, publishing three papers on applications to physical chemistry and thermoelectricity.’
    • ‘Statistical thermodynamics can map out the energy distribution of the water molecules.’
    • ‘In thermodynamics one divides any heat loss or gain by the temperature, and one obtains then a quantity that is called the change in entropy.’
    • ‘In physics, this is the law of thermodynamics: that heat will always flow from hot to cold.’
    • ‘But then we'd have to get into what quantum thermodynamics means, and well, that's a battle for another day!’
    • ‘He taught thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in a very elegant fashion.’
    • ‘In particular, Hawking was gaining a renewed interest in a field called thermodynamics, developed by Lord Kelvin and others in the nineteenth century.’
    • ‘The field of thermodynamics is concerned with all types of energy changes in physical systems.’
    • ‘Enquiries into the role of heat in these reactions led him to study chemical thermodynamics, and eventually to the famous Le Chatelier's principle.’
    • ‘By this time he had completely reversed his ideas about black holes and thermodynamics, the very ideas that had created such arguments a few years earlier.’
    • ‘Beltrami also worked on optics, thermodynamics, elasticity, electricity and magnetism.’
    • ‘He spends much of his book providing us with a brief history of energy and discussions about energy issues such as thermodynamics and electromagnetism.’
    • ‘The topics Brillouin wrote on were the kinetic theory of gases, viscosity, thermodynamics, melting conditions and electricity.’
    • ‘Is the 3rd law of thermodynamics valid even for objects smaller than atoms?’
    • ‘More than 100 texts have been written on chemical thermodynamics but a concise summary of the laws is hard to find.’
    • ‘He started working in thermodynamics - calculating aircraft engine performance.’
    • ‘Only in the nineteenth century did the study of energy come of age, with the invention of the branch of physics known as thermodynamics.’
    • ‘In 1936, he was a visiting professor at Columbia University, where he taught a course on thermodynamics.’
    • ‘As we have noted Jeans worked on thermodynamics, heat and other aspects of radiation, publishing major works on these topics and on applications to astronomy.’
    • ‘The results could also add a further twist to a field Einstein did not foresee - the thermodynamics of black holes.’

Pronunciation:

thermodynamics

/ˌTHərmōdīˈnamiks/