Definition of there you are (or go) in US English:

there you are (or go)

phrase

informal
  • 1This is what you wanted.

    ‘there you are—that'll be $3.80 please’
    • ‘Anyhow I promised Charlie I would give her a name check on the blog so (hoping I got the correct spelling) there you go, Charlie!’
    • ‘They took it out, looked at it, had a bit of a chuckle and said there you go.’
    • ‘One day my husband came home with a computer and said there you go - now start!’
    • ‘So there you go, Betty, a little inside look at the bureau.’
    • ‘And there you go, one round of drinks for nothing.’
    • ‘‘All right, there you go,’ Swingley says - to the dogs, not me.’
  • 2Expressing confirmation, triumph, or resignation.

    ‘there you are! I told you the problem was a political one’
    ‘sometimes it is embarrassing, but there you go’
    • ‘He added: ‘Normally if the first game is away, your last is at home but we're away both times, which is a bit strange, but there you go.’’
    • ‘So there you go - decades waiting to see one of my favourite artists, and I came away thinking I'd sooner hear more unfamiliar stuff and not so many old favourites.’
    • ‘I still don't understand how ‘Highest Selling’ can possibly be an actual category for an award, or why the result would come as a surprise to anyone who keeps an eye on sales, but there you go.’
    • ‘I was a little unfortunate and I might have finished a couple of shots better than I did, but there you go.’
    • ‘He joked: ‘I admit it is unusual for politicians to take part in a feature film, but there you go.’’
    • ‘Actually I find them all annoying, so there you go.’
    • ‘‘Well, there you go then,’ he announced, proudly, ‘I told you so.’’
    • ‘I've no idea how I came to this conclusion, but there you go.’
    • ‘This may sound pathetic, but it is, so there you go.’
    • ‘So there you go, I had a family crisis towards the end of the weekend, but it doesn't feel that way now.’