Definition of theorize in English:

theorize

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Form a theory or set of theories about something.

    ‘they are more interested in obtaining results than in political theorizing’
    • ‘Einstein theorized that electrons are ejected by photons.’
    • ‘Some theorized that differences in development in the womb was a factor.’
    • ‘The scientists had long theorized that dolphins possess the intelligence of an average human teenager and their suspicions were confirmed in this study.’
    • ‘As other women began to disappear around Washington and Oregon, Keppel theorized one man was responsible.’
    • ‘Marx theorized that in the very act of selling one's labor, one is estranging oneself from oneself, as work ‘for another’ is not a natural or desired activity.’
    • ‘A bunch of scientists are now theorizing that SARS might have arrived on Earth from another planet.’
    • ‘It was also theorised that the remains of the seaport must have been washed away in floods during the 14th century.’
    • ‘The philosopher Heidegger theorized that the primary way that we experience the world isn't through our vision, or our hearing, or any other sense perception.’
    • ‘Political scientists have theorized that a better-educated citizenry would be a more involved one.’
    • ‘Scientists have long theorized that retroviruses, which were used in the suspended experiments, could trigger cancer.’
    • ‘Albert Einstein theorized that the speed of gravity was around the speed of light, but no one proved it until now.’
    • ‘Before now, scientists merely theorized that dichlorine monoxide in the stratosphere played a key role in destroying ozone.’
    • ‘Walker theorizes that society's traditional sex roles may further contribute to a victim's belief that she cannot leave the violent relationship.’
    • ‘Since the days of Rutherford, physicists and chemists have theorized that atoms of matter contain even smaller particles than electrons, protons, and neutrons.’
    • ‘Reynolds theorized that all birds follow a few specific rules, such as trying to fly as close together as possible without colliding and trying to maintain the same speed and direction.’
    • ‘I would rather hear someone's account of their experience rather than a load of theorising any day of the week.’
    • ‘He theorizes that human babies weren't meant to be born at forty weeks, but much later.’
    • ‘Scientists theorize that methane rains from Titan's sky, creating surface methane or ethane lakes, which may give rise to clouds, similar to the water cycle on Earth.’
    • ‘He theorized the locals were too scared to stop the insurgents or to turn them in to the Americans.’
    • ‘A few have theorized that Mallove, a scientist, was killed because he was a tireless champion of cold fusion, a controversial cheap and clean alternative energy source.’
    • ‘I read an article by an Arab intellectual where he theorized that one of the Middle East's problems was that the governments controlled the main revenue source.’
    speculate, conjecture, hypothesize, take as a hypothesis, postulate, form a theory, formulate a theory, propose, posit, surmise, suppose, guess
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Create a theoretical premise or framework for (something)
      ‘the classic model of war in the modern era was theorized by the Prussian general and strategist Karl von Clausewitz’
      • ‘Music and dance held fast to religion and tradition because both were intensely theorised and held up by a remarkably well-preserved and staunch public.’
      • ‘It's vainglory and ambition for its own sake; it's hazily theorizing solutions rather than rolling up your sleeves and doing something.’
      • ‘In this trajectory, she presents this set of essays as yet another ground upon which feminism was and is being theorised in India.’
      • ‘He was also little disposed to theorize the process whereby, in a given society, groups compete over the control and employment of the political machinery.’
      • ‘Bulimia Nervosa is theorized to be a self-imposed punishment for something that the person blames themselves for, or a dysfunctional reaction to some unpleasant events in their life.’
      • ‘Bromley and Kenyon theorize a situation in which our sun and another star passed a relatively close 14 billion to 19 billion miles from each other just a few hundred million years after the solar system started to form.’
      • ‘Voltaire helped us laugh and question, and Rousseau theorized the social contract our societies are based on.’
      • ‘If we theorize culture without considering the dynamics of fear or emotions, we naively underestimate the potential for social change.’
      • ‘The language of privacy, and sketching out zones of privacy, many would argue, is our best shot at legally theorizing women's sexuality.’
      • ‘Rather, common codes are theorized to serve as the medium for both perception and action.’
      • ‘Gabler does get to discuss how new technologies are creating new spheres of entertainment and forms of experience and in general describes rather than theorizes the trends he is engaging.’
      • ‘And furthermore, what is the purpose of theorizing a distinction between the thought that goes into creation and the thought about that thought?’
      • ‘While one framework does not undermine the other, I argue that this ecological model allows us to more fully theorize rhetoric as a public creation.’
      • ‘Providing an interpretive framework to examine men's postdivorce responses, Connell theorizes the existence of multiple masculinities and emphasizes the need to examine the interplay among them.’
      • ‘What makes Warman's thesis unsettling is its similarity to those of American right-wing tax protesters who have theorized the illegality of income tax since the 1950s.’
      • ‘Instead, we must theorise the universal values inherent in urban dwelling places and argue that specific places we wish to save exemplify those values.’
      • ‘This event is theorized to have created enormous amounts of dust, which blocked out the sun, possibly for years, and led to the extinction of 75 percent of all living species.’
      • ‘Thinking back to those days, Searle speaks frankly about her frustrating search for role models and texts to help her theorize ideas that were perhaps not yet clearly articulated, but present in embryonic form.’
      • ‘And most fiction writers that theorize a great catastrophe or attack like this, will often say, ‘More people will die in the evacuation than in the actual attack.’’
      • ‘The more the new programs affirm and theorize the student's activity and his working relationship with the teacher, the more they are designed as if the student were merely passive.’

Pronunciation

theorize

/ˈθiəˌraɪz//ˈTHēəˌrīz/