Definition of theology in English:

theology

noun

  • 1The study of the nature of God and religious belief.

    • ‘In theology, exegesis, philosophy, law, and mysticism, Jews and Muslims contributed to and learned from one another.’
    • ‘He was also a chaplain for the university students until 1951, when he again took up his studies on philosophy and theology.’
    • ‘This is a book of stimulating questions on philosophy, theology and scientific theory.’
    • ‘At college he studied history and theology, then spent several years teaching in the Middle East.’
    • ‘Science, like theology, reveals transcendent truths about a changing world.’
    • ‘The religious dimension was not unknown to Darwin, who studied theology at Oxford in his youth.’
    • ‘It has taken her three years to train for the ministry and study for a masters degree in theology.’
    • ‘Human stories are more interesting than an arid study of theology.’
    • ‘In 1888, at the age of 24, he left for America, to study medicine and theology.’
    • ‘It explores the kinds of issues that genetic developments raise for both theology and ethics.’
    • ‘There is a vast area of overlap between theology and the history of religions.’
    • ‘The former Orangeman was awarded a Masters degree in theology for his studies on secret societies and Christianity.’
    • ‘Lopez got a solid grounding in the liberal arts, but enjoyed studying philosophy and theology most.’
    • ‘This, in turn, provides a helpful vantage point from which to understand the nature and task of theology.’
    • ‘While in Carlow he wrote on theology and scripture, literature and homiletics, local history and ecumenism.’
    • ‘Some theologians have claimed that theology gives a justification of religion.’
    • ‘Now you can do science without studying theology, and you can study theology without knowing all that much science.’
    • ‘We tend to think of theology as something you study or write or teach.’
    • ‘And after 11 long years of study, Frank has been awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree in theology and religious studies.’
    • ‘Students at a Christian school will also study theology and biblical ethics as part of their program.’
    • ‘He is the author of a number of books on theology and the philosophy of religion.’
    • ‘The university offered studies in theology, medicine, and law, but nothing at that time in the natural sciences.’
    • ‘Twenty-five at the time, he had been dawdling while taking a degree in theology.’
    1. 1.1Religious beliefs and theory when systematically developed.
      ‘Augustine assimilated Roman ideals into Christian theology’
      [count noun] ‘a willingness to tolerate new theologies’
      • ‘In what specific ways has the Spirit's authority been subtly neglected in evangelical theology?’
      • ‘He must be committed to and must have studied Reformed and Baptist theology.’
      • ‘A great many things regarding Christian theology change when you study them in Hebrew.’
      • ‘That process in itself says a great deal about the nature of Christian theology.’
      • ‘Each of the thinkers discussed, especially Calvin and Schleiermacher, developed their larger systematic theologies in part in response to working out their thought about children.’
      • ‘A true Christian theology must reject any dualism of soul and body, spirit and world.’
      • ‘Many controversies arose as the new religion struggled to develop its core theology.’
      • ‘The deductive, dogmatic, nature of Catholic theology is clearly part of it.’
      • ‘So it has never had until recently the prominence in Christian theology that it has been given by philosophers of religion.’
      • ‘There is in Catholic theology a theory of just war, which stresses exactly this point.’
      • ‘The religion is a blend of Christian theology and indigenous American beliefs.’

Origin

Late Middle English (originally applying only to Christianity): from French théologie, from Latin theologia, from Greek, from theos god + -logia (see -logy).

Pronunciation:

theology

/THēˈäləjē/