Definition of the dead of night in US English:

the dead of night

phrase

  • The quietest, darkest part of the night.

    • ‘Already weak from days without food and water, he and three colleagues had sneaked past a cordon of armed guards in the dead of night.’
    • ‘Theoretically, you could get there in 13 hours but then you'd probably have to travel in the dead of night.’
    • ‘Access was gained in the dead of night by removing heavy steel bars from the drawing room windows at Warneford Place.’
    • ‘It seems that someone is secretly dropping money all over the city in the dead of night, for no apparent purpose.’
    • ‘He was eventually released 25 miles away in a quiet country lane in Northwich, Cheshire, in the dead of night.’
    • ‘However, you never know what strange ideas will suddenly grip me in the dead of night, when I'm alone with my computer.’
    • ‘He stole into the abbey in the dead of night, intent on stealing a personal memento of Scotland's greatest king.’
    • ‘It is understood the service could have been held at the dead of night, so as not to upset mourners attending other cremations.’
    • ‘Ever wondered why the cat is so particular about settling territorial disputes in the dead of night when everyone is asleep?’
    • ‘She and her brother received regular telephone calls in the dead of night from her father, helpless with pain.’