Definition of tempest in English:

tempest

noun

  • A violent windy storm.

    • ‘The first thing I noticed as we approached the front door was that outside seemed to be caught up in a violent tempest.’
    • ‘There wasn't any thunder or lightning, just rain, but it was quite a tempest nonetheless.’
    • ‘The heavy tempests shook the foundation of the Tang Dynasty, its former military glory and pride crumbling into the depths of mere fantasies.’
    • ‘And so, I submissively give in at this stage and let the winds of politics blow all around me without seeking to alter the course of the raging seas and tempests that may lie ahead.’
    • ‘Clapping gave way in an instant to the booming thunder as all turned from the singer to behold the tempest in the sky.’
    • ‘He enjoys the experience of being in the center of the windstorm for it is the only calm part of the tempest.’
    • ‘Back on the streets of Edinburgh, she bids a cheery farewell, braces her brolly against the raging tempest and heads for the shops.’
    • ‘Exotic coasts are often littered with old shipwrecks because of the frequent tempests that have ravaged them in times past - which means they probably still suffer them today.’
    • ‘Abruptly following, a hoard of men appeared on the ridge, and with a howl like a raging tempest, chaos erupted.’
    • ‘Calm seas and easy winds do not test a ship's worthiness, but it is the tempest and the hurricane that show her true metal.’
    • ‘The ancient Maya Indians - who had their heyday in Mexico and Central America from about A.D.250 to 900-had more than a passing familiarity with the tempests that regularly howled off the Atlantic.’
    • ‘News of the unusual discovery is stirring up a tempest among scientists, who are studying the storm to find out how it formed.’
    • ‘The weather seemed to be a pretense for a storm, windy and hinting toward a tempest.’
    • ‘The wind was now practically a tornado, leaves and twigs caught up in its ever-circling tempest.’
    • ‘Inside the sounds of the growing tempest were muffled, but the echo of the wind racking against the rusted metal was not.’
    • ‘So they designed a form of government - and particularly the Senate - that would be slow to act or react to the passing public tempests.’
    • ‘It came from their grandfather - a man who failed to outrun one of the tempests that periodically hit the coast long before the twins were born.’
    • ‘His mind had been too occupied to notice the raging tempest that was taking place up deck.’
    • ‘We rope the house to trees along the shore to prevent it from drifting away when we are buffeted by strong winds during the area's frequent tempests.’
    • ‘They bravely endured these tempests and continued to fight valiantly across the turbid depths to reach their goal…’
    storm, gale, squall, superstorm, hurricane, tornado, whirlwind, cyclone, typhoon
    turmoil, tumult, turbulence, ferment, disturbance, disorder, chaos, upheaval, disruption, commotion, uproar, storm, furore
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • a tempest in a teapot

    • Great anger or excitement about a trivial matter.

      • ‘To some in this small town, it's a tempest in a teapot that smacks of partisan politics.’
      • ‘In truth, this whole point seems like a tempest in a teapot.’
      • ‘In reality, the firestorm of publicity engulfing Gaughan was nothing more than a tempest in a teapot.’
      • ‘Bethel further said that it was a tempest in a teapot that would blow over.’
      • ‘A review of the registration process might prove whether this is a tempest in a teapot.’
      • ‘The dispute here is a tempest in a teapot created by impoverished healthcare budgets that make the above steps unaffordable.’
      • ‘A more valid criticism, perhaps, is that the report is a tempest in a teapot.’
      • ‘I find the discussions interesting, but it is a tempest in a teapot, ultimately irrevelant.’
      • ‘"It's a tempest in a teapot," he said.’
      • ‘Well, it turned out to be a tempest in a teapot.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French tempeste, from Latin tempestas ‘season, weather, storm’, from tempus ‘time, season’.

Pronunciation

tempest

/ˈtɛmpəst//ˈtempəst/