Definition of temerarious in English:

temerarious

adjective

literary
  • Reckless; rash.

    • ‘It could do nobody any harm - indeed I thought it a marvellous moral performance, as it punished the culprits and rewarded the virtuous of my dramatis personæ - but it was a temerarious undertaking, as descriptive of manners and situations of which I knew little but by hearsay.’
    • ‘Whether, the attraction of a sexual stimulant was also present as an enticement for the occasional human temerarious, as the modern tradition suggests, remains an open question.’
    • ‘You're quite right, Jedburgh, I cannot pretend to understand your motives in embarking on such a… temerarious endeavour,’ I snapped, folding my arms crossly.’
    • ‘What you did tonight was half-witted and temerarious.’
    • ‘I have confessed myself a temerarious theologian, and in that passage from boyhood to manhood I ranged widely in my search for some permanently satisfying Truth.’
    reckless, rash, incautious, heedless, unheeding, hasty, overhasty, precipitate, precipitous, impetuous, impulsive, daredevil, hot-headed
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin temerarius (from temere rashly) + -ous.

Pronunciation:

temerarious

/ˌteməˈrerēəs/