Definition of teach in English:

teach

verb

  • 1with object and infinitive or clause Show or explain to (someone) how to do something.

    ‘she taught him to read’
    ‘he taught me how to ride a bike’
    • ‘The education system that would teach girls to read would also empower millions of illiterate boys.’
    • ‘In either case, it illustrates how teaching children to read in Spanish transcends the school grounds.’
    • ‘Talking about adult education, he lauded India's innovative programme that teaches people to read in their mother tongue in just two to three hours.’
    • ‘Colleges of pharmacy are changing their curriculums to teach students the necessary knowledge and skills needed to deliver pharmaceutical care.’
    • ‘As well as the teacher having all the knowledge to teach the kids, the kids can actually help the teacher learn something.’
    • ‘We also have three training organizations prepared to teach workers how to install it.’
    • ‘The way I see it is thus: the older folks have a lot to impart to us, wisdom of the ages, knowledge, time available to teach kids to read, etc.’
    • ‘Phonetics is the way the children are taught to read and write in the Montessori method of education.’
    • ‘You know, he's talking about using scientific research to teach kids how to read.’
    • ‘The charity has educated people about HIV and AIDS, taught women to read, immunised children and helped people rebuild their lives after conflict.’
    • ‘Traditional American Education models call for teaching a child to read between the ages of 7-9.’
    • ‘His mother taught him to read at age three, and ‘once I knew how to read, I was off on my own.’’
    • ‘The choirmaster, Howell Price, taught me how to read music and sing with discipline.’
    • ‘I was happy to have family in the business to teach me the knowledge of the business.’
    • ‘Although most mosques have programs to teach children to read the Koran and memorize verses, the pesantren is unique because it targets small children.’
    • ‘At Oxford University he developed a passion for botany, but finding no-one who could instruct him adequately, he hired a tutor who taught him the new Linnaean precepts.’
    • ‘My mom started teaching me to read at age three, and I never lacked for books and magazines and there were no restrictions on what I was allowed to read.’
    • ‘Again, a reasonable guess is that some instructors might be prepared to teach some students this way.’
    • ‘A carpenter wrote his thanks to Weatherly for teaching him how to read instructions.’
    • ‘What will we learn next, that education schools don't teach educators how to teach kids to read?’
    educate, instruct, school, tutor, give lessons to, coach, train, upskill, ground, enlighten, illuminate, verse, edify, prepare, din something into, indoctrinate, brainwash
    train, show, guide, instruct, demonstrate to, give someone an idea, make clear
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Give information about or instruction in (a subject or skill)
      ‘he came one day each week to teach painting’
      with two objects ‘she teaches me French’
      • ‘However, camp teaches the very skills that will allow camps to respond to these opportunities.’
      • ‘This guide contains all the skills and requirements as well as the background and reference information needed to teach the skills.’
      • ‘How the information and skills are taught are considered to be equally as important as the award itself.’
      • ‘Workshops, run once a week to teach the homeless new skills, have been running for a year and this is the first public display of the resulting work.’
      • ‘Mountain safety boils down mainly to common sense; you can teach yourself the necessary skills, and there are many excellent books on the subject.’
      • ‘Teachers have argued passionately for the opportunity to teach the subject they love, instead of trawling laboriously through past papers.’
      • ‘Unsurprisingly it has been found that subjects which are taught in a more innovative and interesting way get better results and better behaviour in those lessons.’
      • ‘While the children need to be supervised, Principal McGovern argues that it is an excellent way to teach a specialised subject area.’
      • ‘Then again, consider the vested interest of all those who teach the subject of English literature.’
      • ‘I really thank Ben for helping out and getting Ivan to polish up his guitar skills, teaching Charissa her first few chords.’
      • ‘European Studies is taught as a subject in the school and many students have entered EU organised competitions with great success.’
      • ‘The only orderly class I meet in this school is expecting me to teach the subject I know nothing about.’
      • ‘They had become self-taught sailors on the lake, teaching themselves the necessary skills and knots.’
      • ‘It's not just an education system about teaching literacy and numeracy.’
      • ‘But once the notions take hold that parenting is a job and that the required skills can be taught, we may end up with the idea that the aim is to produce a certain type of product.’
      • ‘Interventions can provide the information and teach the skills necessary to implement those strategies.’
      • ‘When Kate Brookes wants to ask a colleague's advice on how to teach her subject it is not just a case of popping into the staff room.’
      • ‘The subjects must be taught in depth at the school level.’
      • ‘I teach two AP subjects and have a lot of trouble fitting in all that I would like for the course.’
      • ‘I have just posted up here some of the ‘Middle Eastern Studies’ that you will NOT hear about in most universities that claim to teach such a subject.’
      give lessons in, lecture in, give instructions in, inform someone about, familiarize someone with, acquaint someone with, instil, inculcate, explicate, explain, expound
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2no object Give such instruction professionally.
      ‘she teaches at the local high school’
      • ‘The majority of these bilingual education teachers taught in transitional bilingual programs.’
      • ‘Many teachers are unqualified to teach according to local public school standards and most don't know how to relate to American-raised children.’
      • ‘I taught at the high school in the morning, one class at Nicholls in the afternoon and then went home to the hard work.’
      • ‘One faculty member acknowledged that it was the source of her motivation for teaching at a community college.’
      • ‘Katherine von Duyke has home taught her 11 children for 16 years, and teaches at a homeschool high school.’
      • ‘He became a secondary school teacher, teaching in schools at Tilberg and Breda.’
      • ‘When I taught at a community college, one of my students was a forty-five-year-old mom who juggled two jobs and a full academic load.’
      • ‘If they fail to keep up the GTC's standards, they will lose their licence to teach in state schools.’
      • ‘To further complicate matters, teachers generally teach as if all students are at the same place in their learning development.’
      • ‘Consider the fact that teachers almost universally discount their wages in order to teach in private schools.’
      • ‘The reason the better students give their teachers higher ratings is that most teachers tend to teach to the better students.’
      • ‘He now teaches at Merivale High School, also in Nepean.’
      • ‘She has taught at the elementary school level and is currently a teacher educator, preparing teachers to teach in diverse classrooms.’
      • ‘The three professors whom I determined to have created the most spirit in their classes all taught at a community college.’
      • ‘If not, what anchoring ideologies define teaching in community colleges?’
      • ‘Both of our teachers have taught in the public schools and consider this a much better situation.’
      • ‘This same person was the only participant in the study ever encouraged by another member of the academy to teach at a community college.’
      • ‘One of the village's primary school teachers, who taught at the orphanage for two days last year, said he would not go back.’
      • ‘This is a book that offers rich possibilities for new directions in teaching at high school and college levels.’
      • ‘What is not entirely clear is whether their commitment is to teaching or more specifically to teaching in a community college.’
    3. 1.3with object Encourage someone to accept (something) as a fact or principle.
      ‘the philosophy teaches self-control’
      • ‘The people growing up with these ideologies usually accept what they are taught.’
      • ‘But Dr Nelson says those who do not accept and teach Australian values should ‘clear off’.’
      • ‘This narrow form of sex education fails to take into consideration this fact and teaches a narrow view, thus ignoring diverse ideas on sexuality.’
      • ‘By teaching ideology instead of facts, our schools are erasing the nation's collective memory.’
      • ‘By now, someone reading this is angrily muttering, but it teaches the kids discipline!’
      • ‘Why should schools face such intense opposition, just because they don't teach evolution as fact?’
      • ‘Texas has approved biology textbooks that, get this: teach evolution as fact, much to the chagrin of creationists.’
      • ‘‘Baby Steps’ parents are encouraged to teach life lessons with familiar objects and activities.’
      • ‘Why not change a great part of that education to teach strength of character in practising abstinence, and learning some moral principles, and teaching the value of marriage?’
      • ‘When they do play, however, they manage to calm angry mobs, encourage world peace and teach vital life lessons - all the usual motivations for today's future bands.’
      • ‘What a responsibility we have to ensure we teach them God's principles - not man's opinions.’
      • ‘In France, evolution is taught as a fact that you have to learn, and if you try to oppose that, you will be in trouble.’
      • ‘Even better is the fact that the program teaches conservative play; they want you to be able to play for a long time and hopefully leave with more money than you came with.’
      • ‘In 610 CE, the main principles of Islam were taught secretly.’
      • ‘And of course, Darwinian evolution is taught as fact in the education systems of Mexico, as it is in so many other countries.’
      • ‘As time went on, Trungpa Rinpoche encouraged me to teach dharma and to step as fully as possible into that role.’
      • ‘When I was a child, when school was education was much better, we were taught discipline both at home and at school.’
      • ‘Are we teaching them the philosophy and the mission, along with fiscal, staff, and program management skills?’
      • ‘And, of course, think also of tax-supported schools that teach evolution as fact.’
    4. 1.4 Cause (someone) to learn or understand something by example or experience.
      ‘traveling taught me that not everyone shared my beliefs’
      ‘my upbringing taught me never to be disrespectful to elders’
      • ‘Our multimedia degree programme teaches students to understand how technology affects business.’
      • ‘Experience teaches us that if it happens in the United States, it will happen here, sooner rather than later.’
      • ‘Experience teaches us that integrity may be compromised for convenience or to avoid unpleasant consequences.’
      • ‘When I was coming into the Church, experience quickly taught me that I could not rely on catechesis at the parish level.’
      • ‘Experience teaches us that excess doesn't buy us happiness, that money can't insulate us from pain.’
      • ‘Experience taught him that art & words were inextricably bound with consciousness.’
      • ‘Experience teaches us, however, that humility often departs when the remembrance of imperfections grows more distant.’
      • ‘The experience of many decades had taught us to understand that the black poor of our country valued a just peace as deeply as they valued their lives.’
      • ‘Things haven't always been as happy for Mick, he has known his share of dark days but experience has taught him that life is precious and to be enjoyed.’
      • ‘Experience has taught me that I should be worried if something is constructed using language and concepts which I can't understand.’
      • ‘Finally, experience teaches us that the fall of a government creates a security gap.’
      • ‘The experience taught me how much it's possible to learn away from home in a new environment.’
      • ‘He takes a deep breath: ‘But such experiences have taught me about human life.’’
      • ‘When things are going well, experience teaches us that turnouts are relatively lower.’
      • ‘Years of bitter experience have taught me that if you don't blow your own trumpet, it's fairly rare that anyone else will do it on your behalf.’
      • ‘Thus, discipline is really a process by which adults teach children and convey knowledge about appropriate behavior for various situations.’
      • ‘My experience taught me that an owner should know every detail, from the cooking of the food up to its management, or he will be tricked by his workers.’
      • ‘The movies teach us to expect violence from the mentally ill - even though it's clear that we have far more to fear from our ostensibly sane fellow citizens.’
      • ‘However, don't they always teach us to learn from our mistakes?’
      • ‘We must save our heritage, we must learn from lessons taught us from the destruction of Swan Arcade and Forster Square Station to name but two examples.’
    5. 1.5informal Make (someone) less inclined to do something.
      ‘I'll teach you to throw rocks at my windows’
      • ‘She'd teach him for messing with every girl he saw.’
      • ‘That'll teach me to forget the look-but-don't-touch rule.’
      • ‘‘I'll teach you to mess with him’ he said, pulling out a knife.’
      • ‘That'll teach you to mess with my friend's shop.’
      • ‘That'll teach you to mess with the Tengon regime!’
      • ‘And that, my redneck cousin, will teach you to mess with a town boy!’
      • ‘That'll teach Ipswich ne'er-do-wells to mess with a man's shed.’

noun

informal
  • A teacher.

    • ‘I entered the class interrupting the lecture the teach was giving.’
    • ‘I had never seen a teach shoot fire from her eyes before, but Miss Gulch looked as if she were only moments away from doing so.’
    • ‘Everyone's eyes shift from the teach, Mrs. Stamos, to us.’
    • ‘Guys, do you remember the time were read the Three Musketeers in class and the teach started to call us that?’
    • ‘Of course, what is new about the teach is that she was sponsored by the City of Oakland and inflicted on public school students.’
    • ‘I suppose they got annoyed when they came in with a hangover and the teach kicked them out.’
    • ‘Then we will attach bowling balls to the ceiling on the string and throw them at the teach.’
    educator, tutor, instructor, pedagogue, schoolteacher, schoolmaster, schoolmistress, master, mistress, governess, educationalist, educationist
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • teach school

    • Be a schoolteacher.

      • ‘She found her way to New York, where she taught school, until Morris hired her and wooed her.’
      • ‘My great aunts worked all through the fifties and sixties, on the farm or teaching school.’
      • ‘The patient, who had taught school until retirement age, had been self-sufficient all of her adult life.’
      • ‘I had such affection for it as a kid, and I later taught school and high school out there for about seven years.’
      • ‘Matt and Ruth live cozily in Camden, Maine, where he works as a family doctor and she teaches school.’
      • ‘Troy's wife, Susan, teaches school in Smith Center.’
      • ‘A shy, quiet boy who loved the outdoors, Thoreau graduated from Harvard College in 1837, taught school intermittently until 1841, then turned to writing as a career.’
      • ‘Alice Chipman Dewey had taught school before attending the University of Michigan.’
      • ‘I teach school and our school colour is red and black.’
      • ‘My mother was teaching school, but that wasn't income enough for four growing children, two of whom were away at boarding school.’
  • teach to the test

    • Teach students using methods intended primarily to improve their performance on an examination rather than to enhance their understanding of a subject.

      ‘teachers are being forced to teach to the test so the school can get funding’

Origin

Old English tǣcan ‘show, present, point out’, of Germanic origin; related to token, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek deiknunai ‘show’, deigma ‘sample’.

Pronunciation

teach

/titʃ//tēCH/