Definition of taste in US English:

taste

noun

  • 1The sensation of flavor perceived in the mouth and throat on contact with a substance.

    ‘the wine had a fruity taste’
    • ‘I find using carbonated water very helpful to rinse the glass and remove the taste from the mouth as well.’
    • ‘The taste explodes in your mouth.’
    • ‘But the taste of that sauce lingered and I finished my water trying to get the taste out of my mouth.’
    • ‘In food, it is used to provide a tangy taste by acidifying foods and drinks.’
    • ‘If the fumes were inhaled in sufficient quantities this could result in burning sensations in the back of the throat possibly characterised by a funny taste in the mouth.’
    • ‘Whisky was associated with a fiery taste and a burning sensation as it went down the gullet.’
    • ‘How the brain perceives taste is a fascinating phenomenon, Barham added.’
    • ‘Dennis also uses melons to infuse tequila, though he usually adds a bit of triple sec to the resulting drink to make the taste a bit smoother.’
    • ‘And like all exotic food, the taste of snake apparently resembles that of chicken.’
    • ‘She tore off a piece of heavily buttered bread and popped it into her mouth, savoring the taste.’
    • ‘She sliced a custard pudding with a spoon, and popped it into her mouth, savoring the taste.’
    • ‘I ate smaller and smaller mouthfuls, not because I was losing my appetite, but to extend the sensation of remarkable tastes.’
    • ‘Jen washed down the aspirin with the water, trying to get the taste out of her mouth.’
    • ‘It must be some puritan streak in me, but I find the detailed discussion of tastes and sensations nauseating and very distressing to read.’
    • ‘I was transfixed by the sumptuous food, all new tastes and textures, sprinkled with this magical green stuff that was fresh, pungent and pokey all at the same time.’
    • ‘The taste overwhelmed my mouth as if I had eaten poisonous chemicals.’
    • ‘The system is highly beneficial in the beer and soft drink industry where the taste of the product is highly influenced by the amount of bubbles within the container.’
    • ‘Three weeks later she complained of a metallic taste and a burning sensation in her mouth.’
    • ‘I love the sight, sound, taste, touch and smell of them.’
    • ‘Water supplies in a South Lakeland town are leaving an earthy taste in people's mouths following an outbreak of algae.’
    flavour, savour, relish, tang, smack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The faculty of perceiving taste.
      ‘birds do not have a highly developed sense of taste’
      • ‘I have a sense of vision, taste, hearing and smell.’
      • ‘It claims to heighten the senses of taste, smell and touch by offering a dining experience in total darkness.’
      • ‘So in addition to the usual five senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell, the mental function is counted as the sixth.’
      • ‘It is through our senses - sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch - that we perceive the world around us.’
      • ‘He relies first on smell, then on taste; his sense of touch comes last.’
      • ‘Of the five senses - touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing - which one is most important to a naval aviator?’
      • ‘For no spirit could feel things if it were defined under our interpretation of senses: touch, taste, smell, hearing and sight are under no part of the term spirit.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, the senses of smell, taste, and touch have not been neglected.’
      • ‘Each plant within the garden has an element which enhances the five senses, i.e. taste, hear, smell, touch and sight.’
      • ‘External stimuli are received through the senses - touch, taste, smell, sight, and sound.’
      • ‘Sensory evaluation is analysis of product attributes perceived by the human senses of smell, taste, touch, sight, and hearing.’
      • ‘Likewise, the quality of each sense perception is embodied as a sense consciousness - sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch.’
      • ‘Bad breath and a decreasing sense of taste and smell are common consequences.’
      • ‘It does not affect touch, taste, sight, smell and hearing.’
      • ‘You are no doubt familiar with the five senses: sight, touch, hearing, smell and taste.’
      • ‘To fully appreciate the complexity of wine, the senses of sight, smell, taste and even touch must be employed.’
      • ‘Other senses like touch, hearing, taste, smell and sight are derived from self-consciousness.’
      • ‘The disease usually does not affect the senses - taste, touch, sight, smell, and hearing - or the mind.’
      • ‘A nonspiritual person only lives by their five senses, touch, taste, sight, smell and hearing.’
      • ‘We perceive our environment via our senses of smell, touch, taste, hearing, sight.’
    2. 1.2 A small portion of food or drink taken as a sample.
      ‘try a taste of Gorgonzola’
      • ‘Arven put the spoon in his mouth and took a taste.’
      • ‘She took the cup in her hands, brought it to her mouth and took a taste.’
      • ‘Forget forthcoming food trends, a taste of the exotic is already on the menu - with no moonfish in sight.’
      • ‘We didn't order anything very typical but the unique Bulgarian dishes offered on the menu are suggested if you want to get a taste of the traditional foods.’
      • ‘She uses some of her class time to give students a taste of foods that they might not have tried before, such as avocado and feta.’
      • ‘After having watched the play, the audience got a taste of Mysore special food.’
      • ‘Even if you are not a drinker, if you ever get the chance to sample a taste of Yellow, say at a formal event or special occasion, I suggest you do.’
      • ‘In delicatessens, it is customary to offer sample tastes of foods as part of the exchange process.’
      mouthful, drop, bit, spoonful, sample, sip, nip, swallow, touch, sprinkle, trickle, soupçon
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 A brief experience of something, conveying its basic character.
      ‘it was his first taste of serious action’
      • ‘While climbing Mount Everest might be out of the question, this camp will give aspiring mountaineers a taste of the climbing experience.’
      • ‘Tomlinson got to sample an early taste of Olympic glory on Wednesday night as West Van's Park Royal played host to the fifth annual North Shore Sport Awards.’
      • ‘I'll share some of that with you here, so that you may have a brief taste of my personal involvement with correspondents.’
      • ‘For the adventurous urbanite, how about experiencing a taste of farm life by visiting a working farm or ranch?’
      • ‘The annual event, the biggest free occasion of its type in south-east England, brought families out into the summer sun to experience a taste of country life.’
      • ‘For 12 years, the Tooreen native was content to fly the high life and sample a taste of the glamour and glitz that the world had to offer.’
      • ‘And the Elder said to him: You have had a brief taste of stillness and inner work, and have experienced the sweetness that comes from them.’
      • ‘Herewith a brief taste of this fine book on the art of corrupting humans as described in the letters of a senior tempter to his nephew Wormwood.’
      • ‘Heritage Day gives us the opportunity to step back in time and sample a taste of life from the ‘good old days’.’
      • ‘A brief taste of this issue can't do it justice: buy.’
      • ‘If you want a taste of Goan food, music, and ambience, then Country Club on Mysore Road is the place for you.’
      • ‘That was the verdict of children at a Whitefield primary school when they sampled a taste of the French way of life.’
      • ‘Five members of Billericay Methodist Church had an unforgettable experience and a taste of African hospitality when they visited Mombasa in Kenya.’
      • ‘Pressley was pivotal in their return to the top division in 1996 and the following season helped United to a third-place finish and a brief taste of European football.’
      • ‘Like the London Marathon, it provides amateurs with a brief taste of just what it's like to participate in one of the world's great sporting events.’
      • ‘So put your inhibitions behind you and allow yourself to sample a taste of something new!’
      • ‘And where better for the Brazilian-native to sample a taste of the Irish culture than in the heart of South Mayo.’
      • ‘It successfully conveys a taste of the horror and the violence that characterised the Pinochet dictatorship.’
      • ‘He had a brief taste of this ill-rewarded toil as a teenager before being recruited to the Liga youth system as a 16-year-old.’
      • ‘In the exhibition on Wednesday, November 24, the group aim to give those living in Sligo town and county a taste of German food, culture and history.’
      experience, impression, sample
      View synonyms
  • 2A person's liking for particular flavors.

    ‘this pudding is too sweet for my taste’
    • ‘The sauce with my duck was a little sweet for my taste, but I should have known that from the description of the dish as caramelised, so that is no criticism.’
    • ‘Swapping one vegetarian sausage for one of mine, I can't say it was entirely to my taste.’
    • ‘There is always homemade chocolate cake, which is rich and moist, albeit a little sweet for my taste.’
    • ‘The easy answer is to grab a frozen pizza, which is just the thing, so long as polystyrene frisbees splattered in cheap tomato paste are to your taste.’
    • ‘Place the birds on a warm plate and bubble up the juice in the pan to reduce it, then season it to your taste.’
    • ‘Place on very hot griddle or frying pan and cook each side to your taste - rare, medium, well done.’
    • ‘The pancakes were a bit too sweet for her tastes.’
    • ‘The chef has made it more sour and sweet to meet the taste of Southern people and the dish is actually fairly bland.’
    • ‘The pudding was dark and rich, just to his taste.’
    • ‘It starts with dried whole peas and of course uses wasabi powder or paste, the amount of which can be adjusted to your taste.’
    • ‘I tried vanilla coke when it came out, and it was very tasty, but given my addiction to plain diet coke… it was a bit too sweet for my tastes.’
    • ‘Everyone should be able to find something which is to their taste on the menu, but it's not a menu where choices are made difficult by the appeal of the dishes.’
    • ‘Connie said the 11.6 fluid ounces of dark ale, bottled in 1977, is not much to her taste as she prefers a cold Fosters lager with a Bailey's Irish Cream chaser.’
    • ‘It was light and crunchy, if a little sweet for my taste, and a good way to finish.’
    • ‘Paan is a small packet made of a special leaf, wrapped around various ingredients - according to your taste - and chewed.’
    • ‘If you are tempted to try Benedictine after reading this but find it too sweet for your taste, mix it half-and-half with brandy.’
    • ‘We loved the idea and we might actually have loved the salad had it not been for the fish which, to our taste, was not soaked for long enough.’
    • ‘It's yummy and satisfying, but a little too sweet for my tastes.’
    • ‘Some say this might weaken the brand power of Reeb, but Huang believes the new Reeb with four flavours may cater to the tastes of more Shanghai people.’
    • ‘Cook under a pre - heated grill for about 5 minutes on each side - or to your taste.’
    palate, sense of taste, taste buds, appetite, stomach
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A person's tendency to like and dislike certain things.
      ‘he found the aggressive competitiveness of the profession was not to his taste’
      ‘have you lost your taste for fancy restaurants?’
      • ‘At the beginning of Darwinia there are perhaps too many characters introduced for my taste, but we soon settle down and concentrate mainly on the fate of Guilford Law.’
      • ‘And this is a weird nostalgic experience through my musical tastes since about 1988, when I first bought a CD player.’
      • ‘The sharing aspect of it let you find others who had similar tastes and sample their collections, letting you find something new.’
      • ‘And they seemed to have similar tastes in food, music and movies as well.’
      • ‘This is a world where lives, character, tastes, moral capacity, sexual preferences, etc., are more often than not dictated by genetic makeup.’
      • ‘Everyone is assumed to have a set of personal tastes and preferences.’
      • ‘The busy silence that occurred before the conductor returned to the stage - like the opening moments of Sgt Pepper's - was more to my taste.’
      • ‘If, like me, you have found that movie just too lurid and sadistic for your taste, Sweet Charlotte will probably be more to your liking.’
      • ‘Personal tastes and preferences that can take any form you two decide on.’
      • ‘She is a fair, sweet girl with simple tastes and needs.’
      • ‘But after that, a reader's reaction to a book becomes more subjective: it is mainly a matter of the reader's personal tastes and preferences.’
      • ‘The ending's a little too sweet for my taste, there are oddities (filmed in summer, supposed to be Christmas) and the plot's conventional.’
      • ‘Moreover, the Bullet, like the Harley Davidson, offers a lot of opportunities for the owner to customise it according to his personal tastes and preferences.’
      • ‘My brother and I share the same taste in food, drink and humour but when it comes to cars we disagree.’
      • ‘You can take either video version or either audio version and tailor your viewing experience to your own tastes.’
      • ‘They are perfectly entitled to their tastes and certainly their experiences.’
      • ‘Obviously, it depends on having a decent-sized sample of your musical tastes before it can make sensible recommendations.’
      • ‘There's a lot of comedy in Mallboy, and Giarrusso is certainly not above getting laughs out of the sheer awfulness of his characters' tastes and habits.’
      • ‘Suppose further that moderate people adjust their tastes and preferences so that they have a reasonable chance of being satisfied with their share of social goods.’
      • ‘He conveys these moral tastes to the reader less by means of argument than by ironic indirection or aesthetic intimation.’
      liking, love, fondness, fancy, desire, preference, penchant, predilection, inclination, partiality, leaning, bent, disposition, proneness
      View synonyms
  • 3The ability to discern what is of good quality or of a high aesthetic standard.

    ‘she has awful taste in literature’
    • ‘I suspect the band may have low standards for songwriting due to bad taste in music.’
    • ‘He had exquisite taste in literature, but curiously enough these wonderful books didn't sell, and he was also short of capital.’
    • ‘You could even argue that Europeans demonstrate better taste in American culture than Americans do.’
    • ‘One would think that Vogue would embody the highest standards of aesthetic taste, no?’
    • ‘Are standards of taste in music, art, or entertainment being raised, maintained or debased?’
    • ‘I think if more people should pay attention to me and what I like because I obviously have refined taste in everything.’
    • ‘As for aesthetics, the Library Board is known for its bad taste in architecture.’
    • ‘Assuming you're more interested in serious thinking than his taste in hair styles and rock music, the proposals are not to be missed.’
    • ‘Their taste in literature he regarded as despicable.’
    • ‘The analysis appreciates Densher's exercise of good taste in his ability to feel Milly's pain and ultimately to repudiate her fortune.’
    • ‘That hardly any believers approach aesthetic taste in this way is in no small part the reason we are flailing about today in a culture of ugliness and death.’
    • ‘In other words, the bosses all had exquisite taste in literature but none of them knew how to read a set of accounts.’
    • ‘Norwegians endeared themselves to me early with their amazingly eclectic taste in popular culture.’
    • ‘You should never apologise for your taste in music, literature, etc - no matter how dodgy!’
    • ‘Londonist is a major fan of Elbow so hopes their lead singer's taste in music matches their ability to write and sing brilliant songs.’
    • ‘In many cases, the owners have employed a great deal of skill and taste in maintaining their home.’
    • ‘For those of you with the good taste, and common sense, to invest your time more productively, the premise is simple.’
    • ‘Even their clothing style and taste in music is simpatico - they're both Goths.’
    • ‘We have much more refined taste in entertainment, like baiting the guy who's so drunk he's hitting on the beer vendor two rows over.’
    • ‘I guess I could tell him he had good taste in literature.’
    judgement, discrimination, discernment, tastefulness, cultivation, culture, refinement, polish, finesse, elegance, grace, style, stylishness
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    1. 3.1 Conformity or failure to conform with generally held views concerning what is offensive or acceptable.
      ‘that's a joke in very bad taste’
      • ‘At the same time, the commission shies away from the more complex issue of taste and decency as it relates to discussion of socially divisive issues such as race, immigration and religion.’
      • ‘We can only hope TV bosses would veto a general election campaign fronted by Ant and Dec on the grounds of taste.’
      • ‘His column about the murder was pulled by the Daily Telegraph this week on grounds of taste.’
      • ‘Hydrogen Guy was about to start reciting a poem on the Joys of Cured Meats, but Deuterium Boy pleaded with him not to on the grounds of good taste.’
      • ‘Of those stores who do not hire out Nazi costumes, Hazeldress, in Didsbury, refuses to do so on grounds of taste.’
      • ‘The webmaster reserves the right to delete, edit or alter user comments on the grounds of abuse, taste or decency.’
      • ‘It came to a decision on seven appeals in this quarter, five of which raised matters of fairness and accuracy and two of which concerned matters of taste and decency.’
      • ‘Sorry if I had to disqualify your entry for lack of taste or offensiveness in general.’
      • ‘Generally, more than half of the complaints received by the ASAI concern alleged misleading advertising; only a third concern taste and decency.’
      • ‘It simply reflects how narrow the accepted terrain of public discussion has become, at a time when ideas can be dismissed out-of-hand as being in bad taste or offensive.’
      • ‘What constitutes an infringement of privacy or bad taste or a failure to conform to proper standards of decency is very much a matter of personal judgment.’
      • ‘Entitled Kitsch Fáshion, it pushed the boundaries so far that, ironically, the story was pulled on grounds of taste.’
      • ‘But without a Christian or other religious culture I really can't see how you can object to Stu and Shell on grounds of anything but taste.’
      • ‘In each case the rejected form is taken to embody that which is beyond the bounds or transgresses the limits of, variously, decency, acceptability, or good taste.’
      • ‘On first encounter, this emblem seems to be in poor taste, even slightly offensive; one that familiarity tends to politely ignore.’
      • ‘Do you claim responsibility for changing the boundaries of taste in film culture?’
      • ‘The mongrel horde of accepted taste will continually have different leaders as they nose in front of each other depending on our angle as listeners/viewers.’
      • ‘Several newspapers last week displayed a lack of taste and discretion which was, frankly, ghoulish and surely contravened two clauses of the editors' code of practice.’
      • ‘But, the thermals are for the most part within the acceptable boundaries of good taste.’
      • ‘The play has already been banned in Nottingham on the grounds of taste.’
      decorum, propriety, correctness, etiquette, politeness, tact, tactfulness, diplomacy, delicacy, nicety, sensitivity, discretion, tastefulness
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verb

[with object]
  • 1Perceive or experience the flavor of.

    ‘she had never tasted ice cream before’
    • ‘As for seafood - ride the DART out to Sandycove and taste the flavours fresh out of the sea at Caviston's Seafood Restaurant.’
    • ‘From having your passport checked, to spending your first Euro, to tasting paella, every fresh experience is an opportunity for learning.’
    • ‘The first time I tasted these flavours I was in New York at a little Cuban café on Prince Street, and thought wow!’
    • ‘You should sip it slowly so that you can taste the real flavour of the tea.’
    • ‘She had eaten so fast it didn't make any difference what she had, because she didn't taste it.’
    • ‘She's seen, caught, smelt and tasted millipedes before.’
    • ‘The magic of Sichuan cuisine is that you can taste the flavours even after your tongue has gone numb.’
    • ‘I can still taste the burnt flavour of the samosas and the rubbery sandwiches.’
    • ‘The restaurant staff who tasted the results found them very different from usual chicken.’
    • ‘Even though my wine was watered down I could still taste its rich flavour.’
    • ‘But the type of seafood used would have made no difference to the disappointment I felt when I tasted it.’
    • ‘We just don't believe anyone's palate can taste other flavours if too much chilli is used.’
    • ‘Linus shall spend all day tasting different things that he didn't like when he was smoking.’
    • ‘Mix it all together so that when you taste it, all the flavours burst’
    • ‘Just taste one of these beauties.’
    • ‘Trying to describe the chile verde experience to someone who's never tasted it is like trying to describe the ocean to someone who has never seen it.’
    • ‘In the evening father lit a fire and boiled water for the tea, with so unique a flavour that never since have I tasted anything like it.’
    • ‘Try real chocolate, which, in its complexity, can offer a pleasure similar to that a drinker experiences tasting the finest wine.’
    • ‘It is not until you taste it that the difference becomes clear.’
    • ‘You'll be able to view exhibits and taste plenty of barbecue, which is included in the price of admission.’
    perceive, discern, make out, distinguish, differentiate
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    1. 1.1no object Have a specified flavor.
      with complement ‘the spinach tastes delicious’
      • ‘I think deep-frying may tend to make you get fat, not because it puts more fat in the food, but because it makes the food taste so damned good!’
      • ‘It is refreshing, therefore, to find in a city with many bad Indian restaurants, one where the food tastes unique.’
      • ‘Sick of wines that tasted of artificial flavours and chemicals, he confided his frustration to his wife.’
      • ‘And while the restaurants may not win any stars in the Michelin Guide, their food sure tastes good after a morning on the slopes.’
      • ‘Lead tastes sweet, which is why children start and continue to put it in their mouths.’
      • ‘Just the way that it melts in your mouth and tastes so splendid and rich… aaaaah!’
      • ‘The question is not whether Waters's food tastes good.’
      • ‘Restaurants generally cook with fat because food tastes better, and people expect larger portions.’
      • ‘The floor is hard, but cool and somehow the food tastes better and the conversation is lighter.’
      • ‘Her immediate reaction was surprise that it actually tasted of chicken.’
      • ‘But each tastes too sweet and too much like chemicals, like something purchased cheaply at a bad supermarket.’
      • ‘The whole business of roasting and grinding your own spices may seem like a lot of trouble, but the resulting blend of flavours tastes much better than commercial spice mixtures.’
      • ‘We foraged for the elusive baski, an absurdly delicious wild strawberry that tasted of cherry and blackcurrant too.’
      • ‘The lung was repellently spongy and tasted of bleach.’
      • ‘Since I began to take blood pressure tablets about two years ago, everything I eat or drink tastes as if it has been sprinkled with salt.’
      • ‘We had barbecues with rosemary, steaks with rosemary and everything we had for Sunday lunch always tasted of rosemary.’
      • ‘All the food tastes like rubber, like it was sitting up in the refrigerator for five years.’
      • ‘The fish was tender and succulent, tasting a little spicy, richly flavoured by the oil, pepper and spices.’
      • ‘The graphic designer in me ensured the meal was all bright greens and oranges, while the cook in me made the food taste nice too.’
      • ‘Ever notice food tastes better when you are hungrier?’
      have a flavour, savour, smack, be reminiscent
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    2. 1.2 Sample or test the flavor of (food or drink) by taking it into the mouth.
      ‘the waiter poured some wine for him to taste’
      • ‘First, the wines are tasted by all of Omni's food & beverage managers at their annual conference.’
      • ‘They are typically required to blind taste a variety of experimental wines.’
      • ‘After our food writers and editors taste each dish, it's first come, first served for the rest of the staff, so it pays to hurry when you smell something good.’
      • ‘Of course we had the cork to test before the wine was poured, and of course it was tasted before all glasses were filled.’
      • ‘Then, Kaga and four judges taste the food and pronounce the winner.’
      • ‘Very educational and then, of course, I tasted their whiskies which were fine.’
      • ‘Critics tasting these wines without food and in large groups often miss wines like these that do not hammer their palates into submission.’
      • ‘This time needs to be savoured, rolled around the palate and gums as though tasting a wine, extracting every last drop of flavour from it, every tiny hint of summer.’
      • ‘I have seen salmon blow a worm in and out of their mouths several times, like a connoisseur tasting fine wine, before swallowing it deep into their gullet.’
      • ‘It's such a pretty place, and we really enjoy stopping by the various vineyards and tasting the local product.’
      sample, test, try, check, examine, savour
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    3. 1.3 Eat or drink a small portion of.
      • ‘She said I could taste a bit, but of course I carried on and finished off the entire bowl.’
      • ‘This dry red wine with rich fruit flavours, smoky bouquet and fabulous garnet colour can be tasted at the fair.’
      • ‘To insure good luck in the coming year one must taste all courses, and there must also be an even number of people at the table to ensure good health.’
      • ‘Fruit and vegetables were then provided at lunch and school staff rewarded children for tasting them or for eating whole portions.’
      • ‘We couldn't have a Greek meal without tasting some baklava, so we ordered one portion to share.’
      consume, drink, eat, partake of, devour
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Have experience of.
      ‘the team has not yet tasted victory at home’
      • ‘He had, of course, already tasted league glory as a player at Goodison back in 1970.’
      • ‘Nobody has been nominated more often without tasting victory.’
      • ‘I tasted different types of suffering which I did not know before.’
      • ‘Bristol Rovers had tasted the magic in the third round, of course, with that stunning 3-1 win at Derby.’
      • ‘The 100-metres world champion since 1997 had finally tasted defeat after victories in 42 consecutive finals.’
      • ‘Once you taste success, you want to experience that as long as you can.’
      • ‘Yet there were almost three decades of struggle before she tasted success.’
      • ‘The third reason that Lord Chaitanya appeared was to enjoy the bliss tasted by Radharani.’
      • ‘Thackley and Liversedge tasted sweet victories last night in the Northern Counties East Premier Division.’
      • ‘They could taste the victory in the air and all they needed to do was find a few more connections.’
      • ‘The universal will replace the individual when we have experienced and tasted it in meditation.’
      • ‘Her films may have been different but they rarely tasted success at the box-office, forcing her to re-think her strategy.’
      • ‘Macken is hoping to see some action in Monday's potential showdown at Molineux, a ground where he has already tasted victory this season.’
      • ‘She will be a different player once she tastes success and wins a title at the $10,000 level.’
      • ‘I hadn't yet tasted the sweet life of web fashion journalism.’
      • ‘The season to visit Munich is from June to October when you can actually enjoy and taste the fun and flora of the city.’
      • ‘Last year, in fact, only four Americans tasted victory.’
      • ‘Before yesterday's match against Dundee, he was unbeaten in 11 outings, tasting victory in eight of them.’
      • ‘Each side has had its victories; each has tasted bitter defeat.’
      • ‘Without a win for nine games they have now tasted victory in their last three matches.’
      experience, undergo, encounter, meet, come face to face with, come up against
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • a bad (or bitter) taste in someone's mouth

    • informal A feeling of distress or disgust following an experience.

      ‘this incident has left a bad taste in all our mouths’
      • ‘If the review just gives the reviewer's reaction to a cd, a reader is left with a bad taste in their mouth and wondering what angle the reviewer is coming from.’
      • ‘The whole experience left a bitter taste in my mouth.’
      • ‘After Shadows, experience with Hollywood left a bad taste in his mouth, so from that point forward Cassavetes either self-financed his films or worked with complete creative control.’
      • ‘I was in no mood to pursue the issue but the experience did leave a bad taste in my mouth.’
      • ‘Afterwards, Charles had made it all seem so reasonable, so perfectly normal, but whenever Maria recollected that scene, she experienced a bad taste in her mouth.’
      • ‘While I'm trying not to let this show sour my entire experience, it definitely left a bad taste in my mouth and made me realize that Edmonton is not my left-wing Mecca in this right-wing province.’
      • ‘I had two experiences that will forever leave a bad taste in my mouth.’
      • ‘It was a good movie, but the whole experience left a bad taste in my mouth, because for the $15 I spent on that one flick, I could have rented three, and I already had the popcorn and soda at home.’
      • ‘It always leaves a bad taste in my mouth too but people should realise that it is the owner who makes these decisions not the Agent.’
      • ‘And, for those who still have a bitter taste in their mouth following The Tuxedo, this is Chan's chance for redemption.’
  • to taste

    • In the amount needed to give a flavor pleasing to someone eating a dish.

      ‘add salt and pepper to taste’
      • ‘For the sauce, stir the remaining ingredients together and season to taste with salt and pepper.’
      • ‘Add salt and pepper to taste, stir well to blend and serve straight away.’
      • ‘Sauté them quickly with the garlic and salt and pepper to taste, and add to the soup.’
      • ‘Season to taste with salt and pepper, and then stir in the remaining butter.’
      • ‘Once these are amalgamated, Parmesan cheese is added, and salt and pepper according to taste.’
      • ‘Remove from the heat, add the capers, lemon zest, Parmesan and salt and pepper to taste.’
      • ‘Add salt and pepper to taste, and if you have it, a little caramelised red onion marmalade will give a final kick.’
      • ‘Stir in tomatoes, tomato purée, sugar and basil and season to taste with salt and pepper.’
      • ‘Mix the oil, orange juice and zest and sherry, and add salt and pepper to taste.’
      • ‘Pour over the oil and orange juice, mix well and season with salt and pepper to taste.’

Origin

Middle English (also in the sense ‘touch’): from Old French tast (noun), taster (verb) ‘touch, try, taste’, perhaps based on a blend of Latin tangere ‘to touch’ and gustare ‘to taste’.

Pronunciation

taste

/teɪst//tāst/