Main definitions of tartan in English

: tartan1tartan2

tartan1

noun

  • A woolen cloth woven in one of several patterns of plaid, especially of a design associated with a particular Scottish clan.

    • ‘He was wearing a tartan patterned lumberjack shirt and jeans.’
    • ‘This involves designing and manufacturing tartans for firms including ScottishPower, IF and Barbour.’
    • ‘The hills were awash with frost and snow and yet nobody dared wear anything but the clan tartan.’
    • ‘We had our tartans woven at a mill that makes only tartans.’
    • ‘Instead of the typical clan tartans, the Orkney ferry is decorated with posters of dragon-bowed great boats and warriors in horned helmets shoving flaming coffins out into the waves.’
    • ‘The whole point of a tartan is to get many colours working together, weaving themselves into a beautiful pattern.’
    • ‘Instead, tartans probably were regionally based with different patterns belonging to different areas of the country.’
    • ‘Each of Scotland's clans has its own tartan, developed over the centuries.’
    • ‘The company designs and produces a huge range of tartans - one of which was recently modelled by Ewan McGregor.’
    • ‘Her version of the plaid, a tartan also in silk, is hung over the shoulder and pinned in place with a brooch.’
    • ‘The dominant symbols of Scottish nationalism - the war-pipes, the military tartans, the Glengarry and so on - are a product of that.’
    • ‘The band has worked hard raising funds for the tartan which cost around £1,000 to design and £300 to kit out each band member.’
    • ‘As tartans became fashionable, their colours were determined by the dyes from clan plants - broom and gorse, symbols of the Sinclairs, Sutherlands and Maclennans, provided yellows.’
    • ‘In his own defence, he discloses that, though he is a Londoner to his pearly suit, he is nevertheless one-eighth Scottish on his mother's side, which doesn't even qualify him for a clan tartan.’
    • ‘If designing a new tartan will save the Scottish Socialist party from dying out completely, I'm willing to have a go.’
    • ‘The revival of the house of Burberry is having an impact too as checks and colourful tartans abound on trousers and skirts.’
    • ‘Clans, tartans, and Highlands, with the help of the Queen herself, had become utterly British and quite fashionable.’
    • ‘Symbols that evoke the past of the Highlands include the system of clan tartans and bagpipes.’
    • ‘The company directors of Beartas designed a new tartan, woven in Harris Tweed and called the ‘Isle of Harris Tartan’.’
    • ‘And yet they made those wonderful clothes for other people - tweeds, cords, mohairs, checks, tartans.’

adjective

  • Used allusively in reference to Scotland or the Scots.

    • ‘This is partly because the much - maligned tartan tax has turned into a remarkably effective instrument of fiscal continence.’
    • ‘Not for him even one of the 300,000 tartan fans specially produced by VisitScotland to promote Scotland in the States.’
    • ‘He would love to think that his part, however small, in Liverpool's restoration under Houllier has stoked the embers of the club's tartan tradition.’
    • ‘In the absence of more tartan involvement, rest assured that some locals will settle for the next best thing, hoping to witness England tumble out of the competition, perhaps even on penalties.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, in the Mail's tartan edition, Mr Bartholomew had changed his tune somewhat, recommending to the rag's Scottish readers that they'd be better off staying put.’
    • ‘In Scotland the red ribbon is tartan thanks to a campaign by the country's leading HIV / AIDS charity, Waverley Care.’
    • ‘The issue has become significant because it is the only fiscal power the Scottish parliament has, short of the 3p up or down in basic rate income tax - but don't expect the tartan tax to be used in the next five years.’
    • ‘Scotland isn't just tartan fun and highland jinks, it's urban youth culture as well.’
    • ‘Is it any wonder resentment is now building over Tony's tartan army?’
    • ‘Davis believes Holyrood should use the tartan tax to cut income tax by 3%, even if that means Scots got a better deal than the English.’
    • ‘To date, yes: we've peddled tartan schlock in the form of hokum Burns Night suppers to generations of tourists so we can't blame them for finding novelty in the trappings of the occasion.’
    • ‘The sight of Andy Henderson standing on the wing still causes a cold sweat in tartan supporters, though at least Chris Cusiter's test debut proved memorable for the right reasons.’
    • ‘Alba may be Gaelic for Scotland, but when it comes to the Glasgow-based insurance company, it should be anything but a source of tartan pride.’
    • ‘Alex Ferguson picking up top coach last year was the nearest we've been to basking in any reflected tartan glory since Liz McColgan did the biz in 1991.’
    • ‘The first is a negative tartan tax to incentivise business location in Scotland.’
    • ‘The first is to prevent Scottish MPs from voting on issues that don't affect Scotland, but Blair needs his tartan army and so that is unlikely to happen.’
    • ‘Chief investment officer Wendy Hay, dubbed Scotland's superwoman and a tartan version of City investment boss Nicola Horlick, was first to be directed to the exit door.’
    • ‘For those who know Mackenzie primarily as the author of whimsical tartan entertainments such as Whisky Galore, this bitter book comes as something of a revelation.’
    • ‘This afternoon she will lead the nearest thing Scotland has had to a serious tartan assault on a Classic in living memory.’
    • ‘As the name would suggest, the outstanding All Black, No 8 Scott Robertson, includes some tartan genes, courtesy of a Perthshire-born grandfather.’

Origin

Late 15th century (originally Scots): perhaps from Old French tertaine, denoting a kind of cloth; compare with tartarin, a rich fabric formerly imported from the east through Tartary.

Pronunciation

tartan

/ˈtɑrtn//ˈtärtn/

Main definitions of tartan in English

: tartan1tartan2

tartan2

noun

historical
  • A lateen-rigged, single-masted ship used in the Mediterranean.

    • ‘The tartan was a small vessel that navigated along the coast of the Mediterranean.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from French tartane, from Italian tartana, perhaps from Arabic ṭarīda.

Pronunciation

tartan

/ˈtɑrtn//ˈtärtn/