Main definitions of tart in English

: tart1tart2tart3

tart1

noun

  • An open pastry case containing a filling.

    • ‘There were also single-crusted tarts with similar fillings and tarts of apples and other fruits.’
    • ‘Proper lunch food is also available, including soups, hot savoury tarts, sandwiches, Greek salad and vegetable lasagne.’
    • ‘We had roast potatoes and cauliflower and then something like apple tart with custard for afters.’
    • ‘Place pineapple on dessert plate and top with chocolate tart and ice cream.’
    • ‘Desserts here have been a weak link, from a tough-crusted fruit tart to tough-skinned profiteroles to a too-goopy bread pudding.’
    • ‘We shared a pudding - home-made apple tart with vanilla ice cream and blueberry sauce.’
    • ‘Dessert was a further roll-call of tradition and included lemon tart, apple crumble, apple tart, banoffi pie, praline cake and creme caramel.’
    • ‘Place a buttercup squash tart on a plate with a serving of salad next to the tart.’
    • ‘Only one dessert - a pumpkin-meringue tart at war with itself - misfires.’
    • ‘Cover each tart with a puff pastry circle and bake until the puff pastry is golden and crisp, about ten minutes.’
    • ‘There are bagels and muffins, chocolate chip cookies, eclairs, tarts, Danish pastries, baklavas and quiches.’
    • ‘I liked the apple tart (with a rich buttery crust and fresh pecan ice cream), and the intensely caramelized Mexican tres leche torte.’
    • ‘We eventually get our custard tarts, still warm from the oven.’
    • ‘We skipped dessert which included pear tart, Italian summer pudding (there's optimism for you) and tirami su.’
    • ‘We use pastry trimmings for our tarts, as the pastry rises less and gives a fine, crisp finish.’
    • ‘Among the street stall holders was Bernie Nyham whose delicious home cooking treats featured apple tarts and custard pies.’
    • ‘Other desserts include French apple tarts, New York cheesecake, and praline imperial.’
    • ‘They can also be shredded into scones or bread to add a gorgeous yellow colour, or added to savoury tarts, sweet buns or sponge puddings.’
    • ‘The dessert cabinet, which contained an apple tart, cheesecake, strawberries and fruit salad, remained tantalisingly out of reach.’
    • ‘We end with Chinese egg custard tart, not too sweet, and very, very light.’
    pastry, flan, tartlet, quiche, strudel
    pie, patty, pasty
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a savory pie): from Old French tarte or medieval Latin tarta, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

tart

/tärt/

Main definitions of tart in English

: tart1tart2tart3

tart2

noun

British
derogatory, informal
  • 1A woman who dresses or behaves in a way that is considered tasteless and sexually provocative.

    • ‘The affairs had continued over the years - one silly tart after another.’
    • ‘My favourite moment had to be his declaration in the diary room that the British public had done well to evict a Page 3 tart, rather than a leading left-wing anti-war crusader like him.’
    • ‘His affair with that posh tart has finally done for him.’
    • ‘Men and women call women in short skirts and lots of make-up 'tarts' and everyone knows it.’
    • ‘My bet is they pigeonhole girls just like they always did, as nice girls or tarts.’
    • ‘What mathematical model could account for the happily married successful man risking marriage and career for a meaningless drunken grope with the office tart at the Christmas party?’
    1. 1.1dated A prostitute.
      ‘the tarts were touting for trade’
      • ‘Maybe you will read this and think she was a tart, but please do not judge someone you don't know.’
      • ‘You might get a tart calling over, ' Hello Jack, how are you ' - that sort of thing.’
      • ‘The suffragettes donned red lipstick as a feminist statement at a time when only tarts and actresses wore the old war paint.’
      • ‘I trust that our council is not spending the £20,000 per day collected from hard-pressed motorists on decorating our roads to the point where they start to resemble a tart's boudoir.’
      • ‘The only alibi he can provide for the night of the murder is that he was being spanked by a tart in frilly knickers.’
      • ‘I started to peel off my wetsuit jacket; feeling now a little bit like a tart in a French brothel on a busy Bastille Day.’
      • ‘It's an exaggeration to say that Boswell and his contemporaries would start the day with a tuppeny tart, get blotto at lunchtime and join in a riot on the way home but not much of an exaggeration.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
informal
  • 1 Dress or make oneself up in order to look attractive or eye-catching.

    • ‘I think that's why we tarted ourselves up like that - so that our original face was hardly seen.’
    • ‘You are gradually trained how to use some of the more advanced items lest you accidentally kill yourself trying to tart yourself up in the mirror.’
    • ‘From her perfect hair and glowing tan and flawless make-up, I'd have figured Julia wouldn't mind tarting herself up for Markus.’
    • ‘So I went and tarted myself up on Tuesday and got a new passport picture done.’
    • ‘After sleeping late, Wade and I tarted ourselves up and walked a few minutes down Cheltenham Beach to North Head where Byron and Briar were to be married.’
    • ‘Prichard is making friends on the sixth floor too, where the secretaries have been treated to an image consultant brought in at company expense to teach them how to tart themselves up.’
    • ‘Knackered already, one tarted oneself up and headed off to Blackheath to meet Chris and his girlfriend.’
    • ‘The only way they can make themselves interesting is to tart themselves up.’
    • ‘Although it hasn't changed I do sometimes think it has become such a fixed thing that I don't really pose too much or wear make up or tart myself up.’
    • ‘And so the ladies decide to tart themselves up as male female impersonators.’
    dress oneself up, make oneself up, smarten oneself up, preen oneself, beautify oneself, groom oneself
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Decorate or improve the appearance of something.
      ‘the page layouts have been tarted up with cartoons’
      • ‘The Government arbitration service moved into new offices eight months ago, spent £70,000 tarting them up - and is now moving out.’
      • ‘An uncrossing is just an uncrossing, whether you want to tart it up in cool post modern chaos lingo is pretty meaningless.’
      • ‘I've already spent £300-400 tarting it up with fresh paint and hiring a crane to get it here.’
      • ‘In Stage 5, I take this tremendously sentimental display of family history and tart it up with lots of spaceships and cartoon characters.’
      • ‘Regardless of the need for the military, the existing one, I suppose, has a right to advertise and tart itself up.’
      • ‘For the last ten years, news divisions have tarted themselves up.’
      • ‘We are tarting the place up a bit and there will be champagne at the bar for him.’
      • ‘The Black Cross of that book was the Golden Cross in Portobello Road, which tragically tarted itself up the week of publication, thus missing out on literary-tourist-trail notoriety.’
      • ‘We can only keep tarting them up so many times before they become life-expired and we need a new train.’
      • ‘I also hope that the tarting the town up doesn't stop.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: probably an abbreviation of sweetheart.

Pronunciation:

tart

/tärt/

Main definitions of tart in English

: tart1tart2tart3

tart3

adjective

  • 1Sharp or acid in taste.

    ‘a tart apple’
    • ‘The soursop is good too; it's made from a sweet, tart fruit and tastes like lemonade, but a little more funky and tropical.’
    • ‘I thought about adding a tart Granny Smith apple to it, too, but that would make a bit too much slaw for just the two of us.’
    • ‘This recipe keeps the purée very tart and sharp.’
    • ‘A crisp, slightly tart apple dipped in chewy caramel is a classic sweet.’
    • ‘The starter of wild mushroom salad was a delight of deep, earthy tastes with a tart balsamic dressing to sharpen up the wild fungus.’
    • ‘And the tangy apple flavour found in most Chardonnays comes primarily from malic acid, the tart acid found in apples.’
    • ‘Boyle went on to characterize acids, noting their sour or tart taste and their ability to corrode metals.’
    • ‘One of our choices was an apple crumble, which brilliantly combined sweet and tart tastes, together with vanilla parfait and toffee sauce.’
    • ‘His brulée was yummy; the tart sweetness of the raspberries combining well with the cool, creamy texture of the creme fraiche and the toffee crunch of the burnt-sugar topping.’
    • ‘Incredibly, after all that, we decided we still had room for dessert, and we tried a tart Cranberry Apple Crisp and a luscious Espresso Nut Brownie.’
    • ‘It turned out that the rich, dense taste of black sesame paste is contrasted by tart lime juice, putting some zing in the glass.’
    • ‘Most important of all are good tomatoes: their ample juices supply enough liquid to moisten the stew and their tart flavour balances the mellow sweetness of the other vegetables.’
    • ‘Need I say that the inch-thick portions were crusty brown on the outside, rosy pink on the inside, steaming from the warmer, speckled with tart dabs of fresh horseradish?’
    • ‘This compound has a fruity flavour which, when added to the tart taste of acetic acid, gives the complex character to a good wine vinegar.’
    • ‘It's a medium to large, red- and green-striped fruit with a crisp, juicy, sweetly tart taste.’
    • ‘Tastes like a cross between a pear and a very tart apricot, with a small kick at the end.’
    • ‘And it was crisp and sweet without being cloying, although I like slightly tart apples as well.’
    • ‘My mother made an amazing apple pie, and we use her recipe, tart and lemony with a piled-high top crust.’
    • ‘The pork was beautifully cooked, but the soft Bramley apple slices were very tart and not to my taste.’
    • ‘Hawthorns are loved for their sweet, tart taste which can improve the appetite, help digestion and aid in weight reduction.’
    sour, sharp, sharp-tasting, tangy, bitter, acid, acidic, zesty, piquant, pungent, strong, harsh, unsweetened, vinegary, lemony, citrus, burning, acrid, acetic
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a remark or tone of voice) cutting, bitter, or sarcastic.
      ‘I bit back a tart reply’
      • ‘Not that any proper Canadian would ever say something so tart or sardonic.’
      • ‘He looked incredulous, unoffended by her tart tone.’
      • ‘From the 19 June Observer magazine ‘Up Front’ profile of Carey, a few tart observations.’
      • ‘When he reiterated it at a City Council meeting some months ago, I offered a tart retort.’
      • ‘She was old enough to be Bahzell's mother, and her tart tone was so like his old nurse's that he grinned despite his tension.’
      • ‘Danny's hands flew to his head self-consciously, the shrill ringing of his phone saving Alyssa from a tart response.’
      • ‘On his way out, Zossimov makes a tart remark about Dounia's attractiveness to Razumihin.’
      • ‘He has emerged as the campaign's best debater, always able to offer a tart critique of what is wrong with all the leading candidates.’
      • ‘With anyone else, Olivia would be tempted to make a tart comment.’
      • ‘Here she was, so recently subjected to tart commentary in a select committee, but willing to demonstrate exactly the kind of fiscal responsibility that this country needs right now.’
      • ‘Over the past two or three elections, I was the victim of the UNC leader's tart tongue.’
      • ‘The song finally shut off and a tart voice came on the line.’
      • ‘That tart comment certainly left its impact on Sunny.’
      • ‘He also became known for his tart, slashing criticism about tax policy - including policies devised by people whose general goals he shared.’
      • ‘You might get a tart calling over, ‘Hello Jack, how are you’ - that sort of thing - and sidle over alongside.’
      • ‘On a similarly tart note, one email doing the rounds allegedly relates to the latest business breakthrough.’
      • ‘He has tart remarks concerning the latest Anglican commotions.’
      • ‘My daughter had rung the ward concerned but got a very tart response as she was not a relative, even though she had been authorised by the husband to take this step.’
      • ‘I started to give a tart reply, but Atelious gave a deep inarticulate growl that was felt more than heard, and she shut up.’

Origin

Old English teart harsh, severe of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

tart

/tärt/