Definition of tapestry in English:

tapestry

noun

  • 1A piece of thick textile fabric with pictures or designs formed by weaving colored weft threads or by embroidering on canvas, used as a wall hanging or furniture covering.

    • ‘It was high-ceilinged and raftered with white stone set with gems, and on the walls were hung tapestries of gold thread.’
    • ‘The tower was burning, quickly spreading to other parts of the castle which were richly furnished with wooden furniture, silk tapestries and oil paintings.’
    • ‘No paintings here, instead the walls were decorated with ornate tapestries featuring geometric designs that could almost have been old Celtic.’
    • ‘Later, the artist went through periods of making tapestry and large-scale textile works.’
    • ‘Every room, stairwell and recess jostles with eye-catching objects, pictures, furniture, tapestries.’
    • ‘The walls were coated with cobwebs and blanketed with old tapestries.’
    • ‘She was a very keen gardener and flowers and plants feature in the Elizabethan needlework and tapestries in the house.’
    • ‘The walls had excellently crafted tapestries that must have been precious family heirlooms from the look of them.’
    • ‘She sat down at her loom, working quickly on the tapestry she was weaving.’
    • ‘The Tajik style of tapestries typically has floral designs on silk or cotton and is made on a tambour frame.’
    • ‘One other area of textile work worthy of note is that of tapestry and embroidery.’
    • ‘Her range of work includes hand-woven tapestry, wall hangings, framed tapestries, hand-woven bags and belts.’
    • ‘On the walls, there were thick tapestries made of expensive fabrics, and old pictures painted in glory.’
    • ‘Brightly colored fabric and large tapestries lined all the walls except for the one directly in front of the doors.’
    • ‘His house was decorated with paintings, tapestries, and family pictures.’
    • ‘From 1977 on the work she exhibited included both large pieces of tapestry weaving and finely woven braids.’
    • ‘In 1533 the Dermoyen tapestry firm dispatched a team of weavers and merchants to Istanbul to design tapestries for the sultan.’
    • ‘The tapestry is woven in wool on linen warps and contains details in silk, gold and silver.’
    • ‘Framed pictures and tapestries lined every hallway they passed.’
    • ‘She embroiders clothes, makes tapestries, and weaves.’
    1. 1.1 Used in reference to an intricate or complex combination of things or sequence of events.
      ‘a tapestry of cultures, races, and customs’
      • ‘But this remains only one small thread in the environmentalist tapestry.’
      • ‘Immigrant literature may seem to occupy a curious midway world, weaving a tapestry that is at once familiar and far away.’
      • ‘His betrayal was woven into the colorful tapestry that was their story.’
      • ‘You may be an integrator, able to seamlessly weave a tapestry of home and work threads.’
      • ‘Meticulously illustrated pictures painted with a careful hand spanned pages upon pages in an epic tapestry of secret history.’
      • ‘Using archival footage, the producers created a beautiful tapestry of a life well spent.’
      • ‘No less important, is the tapestry of outreach events organised by orchestras that bring musicians' skills off the stage.’
      • ‘My own dreams seemed trivial before this tapestry of family plans and lifelong ambitions and children's college funds.’
      • ‘His past was a bitter tapestry sewn together from threads of fear and insecurity.’
      • ‘The road to Mandalay is an asphalt thread through a tapestry of traditional village life.’
      • ‘This intuitive quality that you speak of is not an entirely positive thread in the tapestry of my being.’
      • ‘To complete his tapestry of interwoven plots, the resolution had to be brilliantly contrived.’
      • ‘Over time, this tolerant allegiance has woven the varied tapestry of Indian Hindu Dharma.’
      • ‘Tibetans make as much a part of the cultural tapestry of India as many other ethnic communities and cultures.’
      • ‘Form and content have been beautifully woven into a tapestry of romance, speaking for the here and now.’
      • ‘In fact, much of this issue of History Today picks up strands of the complex tapestry of the history of liberty.’
      • ‘I've been told that my life is but a single thread in the tapestry of the universe.’
      • ‘The tapestry of this complex play gives scope for some exciting performances, particularly for the wives and daughter.’
      • ‘And in conversation he wove a fantastic tapestry of myths about his personal life.’
      • ‘As was indicated in Chapter 3, this rich tapestry of cultural and social variety is no new phenomenon.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French tapisserie, from tapissier tapestry worker or tapisser to carpet from tapis carpet, tapis.

Pronunciation:

tapestry

/ˈtapəstrē/