Definition of tamarisk in English:

tamarisk

noun

  • An Old World shrub or small tree with tiny scalelike leaves borne on slender branches, giving it a feathery appearance.

    • ‘A new bird I saw a couple of days ago was a male Redstart hopping around in the tamarisk trees near our building.’
    • ‘The subtle pinks and reds of tamarisk and acequia willows first appear along our water course, the green of young cottonwood leaves to follow soon.’
    • ‘Nearly every patch of mesquite and tamarisk from San Diego east, at least every patch large enough to afford shade and cover, hides a green-striped vehicle, ‘limas verdes,’ or green limes in border slang.’
    • ‘Nonnative tamarisk or saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) has invaded many wetlands, and others have been drained and filled.’
    • ‘In addition, the species is potentially vulnerable to competition by nonnative invasive vegetation such as tamarisk, habitat altering activities such as overgrazing or mowing, and the long-term drought in the Southwest.’
    • ‘A couple days ago I saw a spotted flycatcher hawking for bugs in one of the tamarisk trees behind our building.’
    • ‘He'd load up the plane with blocks of ice and cases of beer and then roar down the canyon at 150 miles an hour, buzzing the tops of the tamarisk trees and looking for his camps.’
    • ‘And then came the churning, rolling and rolling again in the river bottom, crashing against rocks and brushing by tamarisks bent by the flood.’
    • ‘They sing, chase each other around and hop from branch to branch in the tamarisk trees.’
    • ‘The banks were choked with willow and tamarisk, which I occasionally had to crawl under on my belly.’
    • ‘The tamarisk trees cast flimsy shadows on the lake's surface.’
    • ‘There were mangoes and cherries and quinces and apples and apricots and almonds, and beyond the orchards there were thickets of tamarisk and casuarina as well as groves of mulberry trees belonging to the silk farmers.’
    • ‘A trail runs down to the tamarisk forest on the floodplain of the River Jordan, which forms the border between Jordan and Israel.’
    • ‘There were also some fine tamarisk trees growing near the pond.’
    • ‘Bermuda's windswept northern coastline is protected from spray by non-native tamarisk trees.’
    • ‘One building was surrounded by tall tamarisk and Eucalyptus trees.’
    • ‘Many of the areas that once supported Fremont cottonwoods have been colonized by tamarisk (Tamarix sp.), an aggressive, water-sucking invader from Eurasia, also known as salt-cedar.’
    • ‘Since its introduction in the 1800s as a soil stabilizer and ornamental, tamarisk has gone on to infest 1.6 million acres of the West's precious riparian areas.’
    • ‘I found an overgrown running track with interesting succulent plants and dwarf tamarisk bushes.’
    • ‘Once an arm of the lake, the delta here is today choked with thick stands of invasive tamarisk.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin tamariscus, variant of Latin tamarix, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

tamarisk

/ˈtæmərəsk//ˈtamərəsk/