Main definitions of talus in English

: talus1talus2

talus1

noun

Anatomy
  • The large bone in the ankle that articulates with the tibia of the leg and the calcaneum and navicular bone of the foot.

    Also called astragalus
    • ‘In this series of operations, we used suture anchor devices to fix the free ends of the split patellar tendon to the talus and the calcaneus.’
    • ‘The tarsal tunnel, which is located on the medial aspect of the posterior heel, is bounded by the flexor retinaculum and the medial surfaces of the talus and calcaneus.’
    • ‘Because of the bony articulation between the medial malleolus and the talus, medial ankle sprains are less common than lateral sprains.’
    • ‘The ankle joint is formed by the articulation of the talus with the tibia and fibula.’
    • ‘The physician identifies the space between the anterior border of the medial malleolus and the medial border of the tibialis anterior tendon and palpates this space for the articulation of the talus and tibia.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin, literally ankle, heel.

Pronunciation:

talus

/ˈtāləs/

Main definitions of talus in English

: talus1talus2

talus2

noun

  • 1A sloping mass of rock fragments at the foot of a cliff.

    • ‘The more extreme of these were found within the fault zones separating adjacent basalt blocks, or were on north slopes below steep areas of consolidated talus.’
    • ‘In contrast, the talus, or rock rubble, accumulated beneath cool, north-facing cliffs sometimes provides a very different kind of habitat, one that biologists call algific talus slope, or simply algific slope.’
    • ‘In these situations the free face can extend to sea level and talus slopes will be absent.’
    • ‘Their typical breeding habitat is rocky talus and snowfields near sedge and grassy areas.’
    • ‘When I finally stepped off the glacier onto the rock ridge - safe - my legs gave out from under me and I crumpled into the talus.’
    • ‘Scrambling up the talus slope, the cave entrance is easy to spot on the right side.’
    • ‘The stand is surrounded on both sides by steep slopes of sandstone talus.’
    • ‘Above them, the rest of us began negotiating the long, steep descent through talus and boulder fields, sun shining down on our slow-moving band now that the storm had followed ‘the Lads’ downslope.’
    • ‘From the talus slopes nearby, she'll dig out army cutworm moths, which are about 60 percent fat.’
    • ‘There the long crest of the mountain broke sharply into a talus slope that, for the uppermost hundred meters, was almost a sheer cliff.’
    • ‘We stepped gingerly onto the talus and then froze immediately when we heard yelling below: We were kicking rocks down onto other teams.’
    • ‘Litters are born in the talus (rock piles) and weaned at 3-4 weeks after birth.’
    • ‘Along these exposed fault scarps, 500 m or more high, not only can the nature of oceanic crust be examined, but complex patterns of fault breccias, talus, and lavas can be discerned.’
    • ‘We clawed our way up a high mountain ridge covered in fine, shifting talus and on the far side got caught in a thunderstorm.’
    • ‘These wrens breed in rocky habitats, such as canyons, coulees, outcroppings, and talus slopes in the steppe and dry forests.’
    • ‘Another scientist reported grizzlies flipping over rocks to lick up army cutworm moths, a fat-bodied insect that hides by day in the high-altitude talus slopes in the Rockies.’
    • ‘Protection of algific talus slopes may help prevent the need for threatened or endangered status for these other snails and plants like the golden saxifrage.’
    • ‘It was decided that Paul would be slid down the talus slope in a stokes litter, and we all pitched in to wrestle him down.’
    • ‘A ewe, two lambs, and a young ram picked their way up a talus slope until they disappeared by blending perfectly into the surrounding rocks.’
    • ‘Rain cascades down glacier carved valleys, gathering with the steady, icy melt to roam through the talus and house-sized boulders.’
    1. 1.1The sloping side of an earthwork, or of a wall that tapers to the top.
      • ‘Soil loss and runoff were evaluated over a 2-year period (2001-2002) on the taluses of terraces, in this zone of intense subtropical orchard cultivation.’
      • ‘Large taluses were added to the southwest and east sides to strengthen the outer wall and to make it earthquake resistant.’
      • ‘The talus is an architectural feature of some late medieval castles, especially prevalent in crusader constructions.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

talus

/ˈtāləs/