Definition of take it or leave it in US English:

take it or leave it

phrase

  • usually in imperative Said to express that the offer one has made is not negotiable and that one is indifferent to another's reaction to it.

    ‘that's the deal—take it or leave it’
    • ‘They suspect that the government will then abandon the talks and make them a take it or leave it offer.’
    • ‘The invitation to consent is very much on a take it or leave it basis.’
    • ‘The art of haggling, as I see it, is to not actually want what is on offer, and show a take it or leave it attitude.’
    • ‘This looks like an opening gambit rather than a take it or leave it offer.’
    • ‘It was presented on a plate to us in Melbourne with a take it or leave it attitude.’
    • ‘He offered the cash and said take it or leave it and the bank eventually came back and said it would accept the cash.’
    • ‘It tends to be a case of take it or leave it, so now what we have to do is speak to more clubs and see if we can get a better deal elsewhere.’
    • ‘We have already been told that the moving of the market and interchange are not negotiable and that, in effect, we can either take it or leave it.’
    • ‘And they would insist that they would choose the lawyers for you, and they give you a very stark choice: take it or leave it.’
    • ‘Would they tell them to take it or leave it, this is what we offer?’