Definition of take it into one's head to do something in US English:

take it into one's head to do something

phrase

  • Impetuously decide to do something.

    • ‘He wasn't exactly sure how he'd get her to talk if she took it into her head to be difficult, but he was sure he could think of something.’
    • ‘I took it into my head to write a formal sonnet in classical form, and have been sweating over it all day, breaking off now and again to have a good curse at the obstinacy that words exhibit when you try to herd them into a prescribed form.’
    • ‘When we exited the store and headed back, Jake took it into his head to ask, ‘Where next mother?’’
    • ‘If it should happen you'd aught to do with that, I just might take it into my head to carve out your liver and fry it in front of you.’
    • ‘Left alone at home one day, she took it into her head to dress up in clothes belonging to the family servant: a ragged blue ankle-length dress with a long, faded red apron, and a rough cotton shawl and hood over the top.’
    • ‘Talking of which, they say the front benches are exactly three sword lengths apart, just in case the leader of the opposition takes it into his head to disembowel the Prime Minister.’
    • ‘No one, after all, wanted to get too friendly with a gigantic barbarian who might suddenly take it into his head to chop one into teeny, tiny pieces for no particular reason.’
    • ‘I asked if the reason for the questions was to keep the doctor on the right side of the law in case I took it into my head to bring an action against him.’
    • ‘I took it into my head to take some book along to moderate my pace.’
    • ‘Why, when two men in medieval times chanced to to be standing next to each other, did one of them suddenly take it into his head to do this thing, and why was the other one happy to acquiesce?’