Definition of take flight in US English:

take flight

phrase

  • 1(of a bird) take off and fly.

    ‘the whole flock took flight’
    figurative ‘she entered the company after a year's apprenticeship, and her career took flight’
    • ‘A large flock of birds took flight as the tree that Athrahn was hacking up, fell.’
    • ‘She stares intensely at a scene, immersing herself in it fully, and suddenly she and the whole thing take flight.’
    • ‘A duck took flight as I took a seat by Susanita's side, making a fluttering sound in its wake.’
    • ‘It was on December 27, 1904, at the Duke of York's Theatre in London that JM Barrie's celebrated eternal boy first took flight.’
    • ‘For instance, in the opening moments, a sinister flock of birds takes flight and a hearse-like limousine crosses the path of a fire truck backing out of a station.’
    • ‘He was a key player on the 19s that won the World Cup, and then he took flight, basically - two years later he was scoring three tries against the French in Paris.’
    • ‘The dragon beats its wings and takes flight above the bodies.’
    • ‘This duck is strong and fast and, unlike many diving ducks, can take flight directly from the water without a running start.’
    • ‘A flock of birds surges impetuously from the thickets and takes flight towards the windmills that decorate the landscape.’
    • ‘The flocks on the old folk's home took flight and circled the street.’
    flee, run, run away, run off, make a run for it, run for it, be gone, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, absent oneself, make oneself scarce, abscond, head for the hills, do a disappearing act
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  • 2Flee.

    ‘noise that would prompt a spooked horse to take flight’
    • ‘Pavli rushed from his bedroom and took to flight, landing on his mother's lap and forcing a surprised laugh.’
    • ‘Alexis prepared to take aim again, but before she could do so, the two men took flight, fleeing back the way they came.’
    • ‘Yelling with laughter, the rest of the spray cans were flung down and the whole gang took flight back to the park.’
    • ‘Instantly, it took to flight, heading away from the man.’
    • ‘Did you not see that while fighting the Pathans, they took to flight which was deceptive.’
    • ‘They took flight when they saw that their escape route was blocked after a neighbour had parked his car in a laneway where their own vehicle was parked.’
    • ‘When the darkness closed around her Ayala lost all nerve and took to flight with a timid yelp.’
    • ‘After his short speech, he took to flight, hopping from the platform as he twisted towards the train.’
    • ‘The monster took to flight and fell backward, hitting the ground and rolling to his feet.’
    • ‘He narrowly escaped an arrest warrant in the US by taking flight to Panama with the help of church contacts.’
    flee, run, run away, run off, make a run for it, run for it, be gone, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, absent oneself, make oneself scarce, abscond, head for the hills, do a disappearing act
    View synonyms