Main definitions of tag in US English:

: tag1tag2

tag1

noun

  • 1A label attached to someone or something for the purpose of identification or to give other information.

    • ‘There have been complaints from the public about some metro police officers not having name tags identifying them.’
    • ‘Each pot was labeled with a galvanized tag and watered daily.’
    • ‘Your agent will probably be able to help with the relevant safety certificates, and checking the furnishings is a case of looking for the relevant labels and tags.’
    • ‘The gang is targeting pedigree dogs who have tags with their name and telephone numbers.’
    • ‘She cleared her throat and leaned forward slightly peering at the name tag attached to his bright orange monitor vest.’
    • ‘Everyone who came wore a name tag indicating one thing they wanted to swap.’
    • ‘An identification tag is your pet's best protection if you and your pet become separated.’
    • ‘Today she was sorting the spices cabinet in alphabetical order, having run out of labels and tags to cut off things.’
    • ‘Ethan, the class ‘eccentric,’ decided to cut all the labels and tags from his clothing and sew them onto a T-shirt.’
    • ‘He noticed he was an intern at the hospital by his scrubs and the tag on his shirt labeling him as such.’
    • ‘He reached into the box and held up a braided metal necklace with a tag attached to it.’
    • ‘You notice this is the same man who appeared when you wantonly ripped the tag off the mattress.’
    • ‘It fits around your dog's neck and carries its identification and inoculation tags.’
    • ‘The specimens were not permanently marked, but instead bore paper tags attached with string loops.’
    • ‘All pets should have collars and tags with easily visible identification.’
    • ‘While you're untying, remove any labels or tags that are still attached.’
    • ‘He wore a plastic tag around his neck identifying him as an employee of a company called Dyncorp.’
    • ‘Three groups of 20 calves found with suspect identifications or without tags over the past three days are the focus of the investigation.’
    • ‘This means six thousand faces must be photographed and six thousand identification tags created.’
    • ‘Use inexpensive white office labels as gift tags.’
    label, ticket, badge, mark, marker, tab, tally, sticker, docket, stub, chit, chitty, counterfoil, flag, stamp
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An electronic device that can be attached to someone or something for monitoring purposes, e.g., to deter shoplifters.
      • ‘The system is believed to feature electronic ankle tags with wireless connections to special mobile devices that must be carried by the offender at all times.’
      • ‘The vehicle then must drive in a restricted toll-booth lane that ‘reads’ the tag.’
      • ‘But instead of custody the two will be confined to their homes in the evenings and at night, their compliance monitored using electronic tags.’
      • ‘One system had a permanent electronic identification neck tag on each cow, which increased the total system cost.’
      • ‘A security tag is a small electronic device that triggers an alarm if the product is smuggled outside the showroom.’
      • ‘Cohen said that one of their customers is a hospital that has attached Wi-Fi tags to wheelchairs so it can track them.’
      • ‘You never know, maybe our house arrest electronic tags will have sequential serial numbers!’
      • ‘Privacy activists warn that police will use the tags to track suspects, and that criminals will obtain tag-readers to locate valuables.’
      • ‘Testers also expressed worries that offenders appeared to be able to ‘shield’ their tags from detection devices, allowing them to go to places where they had been banned.’
      • ‘The tags consist of an electronic circuit, antenna and memory chip.’
      • ‘One of the most important recent technological developments in radio tagging has been increased use of satellite tracking and GPS tags.’
      • ‘Prisoners are now released two months early and spend that period under a 12 hours a day home detention curfew order, monitored by an electronic tag.’
      • ‘The birds have been bred in captivity and will be fitted with radio tags to monitor their survival.’
      • ‘The little tags can transmit an electronic product code to a wireless receiver, speeding up scanning, and making the inventory process almost automatic.’
      • ‘OK, so what we're going to do is we're going to give him a transponder tag, which is essentially the same as the microchips that vets will put in a dog.’
      • ‘Each tag has 128 bytes of memory that can be accessed one billion times, giving it a continuous work life of about ten years.’
      • ‘There is also the opportunity for including a universal tag in new cars.’
      • ‘The most worthy community penalty is the curfew order, monitored by an electronic tag attached to the defendant's ankle, which requires him to be at home for up to twelve hours a day.’
      • ‘Approaching the toll bridges, electronic sensors read the tags, debit the customer's account with the toll fee and automatically lift the barriers.’
      • ‘All suppliers will be required to put radio tags containing electronic product codes on pallets and cases by the end of 2006.’
    2. 1.2 A nickname or description popularly given to someone or something.
      • ‘So it is little wonder that he chose Bonobo as his DJ tag, especially given the nature of the music he produces.’
      • ‘Make the appointment on the basis that every pound spent on sport is a contribution to the health of the nation and part of the effort to lose our tag as the sick man of Europe.’
      • ‘In 2002, the pair made a documentary entitled Ballet Boyz, and they haven't been able to shake off the tag since.’
      • ‘Wild Child was a phrase created to describe her beloved twin, but Callie's lips curved slightly as she realised that Stacie was right, bookworm would be a better tag.’
      • ‘He's never been too comfortable with the superstar tag, he's never been too keen to bare his soul in public and he has never done anything unless it was on his own terms.’
      • ‘At the very least, he's a far richer playwright than the dour tag would imply.’
      • ‘Everyone spoken to for this story agrees - the politically correct tag has stuck and is damaging.’
      designation, denomination, label, description, characterization, identification, identity
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal A nickname or other identifying mark written as the signature of a graffiti artist.
      ‘scrawled felt-tip tags on city walls’
      • ‘Young vandals have scrawled their tags along Malden Road for years but the problem has got worse in recent weeks, particularly since the start of the school holidays.’
      • ‘The tags have been seen throughout Morden and elsewhere in Merton but the council's graffiti team say tags may also appear in schoolbooks, on bags or on other personal possessions.’
      • ‘Gang tags and general graffiti had been scrawled everywhere a vandal with a spray can could reach.’
      • ‘York Police have created a database of distinctive graffiti tags which they hope will help them link offences and target offenders.’
      • ‘Martin looked around him at the stained sleeping bags covering patches of worse stained carpet and the walls scrawled with tags, taunts and empty boasts.’
      • ‘Now she doesn't even bother washing the tags from her property as the 48-year-old is resigned to the fact that the graffiti vandals will return.’
      • ‘I often see other small stores with tags written across their windows, not even well done.’
      • ‘Hundreds of new graffiti tags are appearing all over Haydon Wick and Greenmeadow.’
      • ‘The tags, writing and art style are all collected so in the event of a sprayer being caught, officers may be able to use a portfolio of evidence of other offences.’
      • ‘Anyone who can identify vandals responsible for these tags can call the council's 24-hour graffiti hotline.’
      • ‘Troubled Temple Hill is scarred by youth crime, most notably with graffiti tags all over walls and homes.’
      • ‘His graffiti tag is a common sight around Bexley.’
      • ‘Leigh has become the biggest problem area and clean-up teams have been photographing graffiti and tags so evidence will be available if the culprits end up in court.’
      • ‘When officers see a fresh graffiti tag on a street wall, they send an image in real time by phone to the crime management desk.’
      • ‘The police believe that one group of people is responsible for the graffiti across West Swindon as the same graffiti tags keep appearing.’
      • ‘The white cement walls are spray-painted with images of red and blue bicycles, like miniature graffiti tags.’
    4. 1.4Computing An instruction appended to a piece of text in a markup language in order to specify how it is displayed or interpreted.
      • ‘As anyone with a collection of songs on their computer knows, the information contained in the information tags isn't always perfect.’
      • ‘The XML tags describe the content, unlike HTML, which presents and formats information.’
      • ‘In XML, the tags describe the structure and the meaning of the data.’
      • ‘While you're rewriting your title and description tags, don't forget the keywords meta tag.’
      • ‘HTML was invented with the specific purpose of providing a universal set of tags for displaying of information.’
    5. 1.5 A word, phrase, or name used to identify digital content such as blog and social media posts as belonging to a particular category or concerning a particular person or topic.
      ‘you can easily add tags to photos en masse’
    6. 1.6US The license plate of a motor vehicle.
      • ‘In this case, the defendant was driving a car with stolen tags and the license plate light out.’
      • ‘She drove more slowly now, careful to look in the parked cars for anyone who might be watching, checking the tags for a government plate.’
      • ‘And for extra security, I exchanged the tags on Pearson's car for those of an identical vehicle parked in the long term stay at Miami airport.’
      • ‘As it turned out I could read the licence tags at the specified distance.’
      • ‘He was also charged with hunting without a valid licence and with using licence tags belonging to his wife, and a juvenile.’
      • ‘If you do, they'll know it somehow, and it would be wise to keep an eye out for big guys with shaved heads wearing trench coats and driving big black cars with Georgia tags.’
      • ‘Tail numbers, which start with the letter ‘N’ are to aircraft what license tags are to automobiles.’
      • ‘It's important for a dealer to be service oriented, helping buyers get vehicle tags and sign up for car insurance.’
      • ‘A single person also has what Paul calls worldly responsibilities - paying bills, getting the car tag, going to work.’
      • ‘But somehow after the holiday there were a lot of things that I needed to get sorted, bills to pay, my car's licence tag to renew, emails to read and reply to… so very little got done.’
  • 2A small piece or part that is attached to a main body.

    • ‘A steaming mug sat in front of him, a tea bag tag dangling down the side.’
    • ‘Dangling on the end of a plastic tag hung the key to the room next door.’
    1. 2.1 A ragged lock of wool on a sheep.
    2. 2.2 The tip of an animal's tail when it is distinctively colored.
    3. 2.3 A loose or spare end of something; a leftover.
    4. 2.4 A metal or plastic point at the end of a shoelace that stiffens it, making it easier to insert through an eyelet.
  • 3A frequently repeated quotation or stock phrase.

    • ‘I have never doubted what he was referring to whenever he barked out his slithery tag phrase.’
    • ‘And what a stupid tag line: Are you thinking what we're thinking?’
    • ‘Indeed, it is difficult to embody what we do in a tag line.’
    • ‘Her tag phrase is ‘Did I tell you that I would do it’, clearly asserting that her word is her absolute bond.’
    • ‘The new work takes a celebratory approach, with upbeat music and the tag: ‘How good is that.’’
    quotation, stock phrase, platitude, cliché, epithet, quote, extract, excerpt, passage, allusion, phrase
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 (in drama) a closing speech addressed to the audience.
    2. 3.2 A refrain or musical phrase in a song or piece of music.
    3. 3.3Grammar A short phrase or clause added to an already complete sentence, as in I like it, I do.
      See also tag question
      • ‘However, such uses in quotative tags are fairly common.’
      • ‘These tags litter our own speech, oiling the wheels of conversation, organising turn-taking and clearing up misunderstanding.’
      • ‘Another possibility is for the tag to agree with a subordinate clause: I don't think they'll come now, will they?; That's a nice mess you've got us into, haven't you?’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Attach a label to.

    ‘the bears were tagged and released’
    • ‘Then there was the long task of unpacking, labeling, tagging, and re-packing every single can of pickles.’
    • ‘Instead of killing the fish and thus depleting the ecosystem, fishermen can tag and release them.’
    • ‘In addition, many gift items in the Gallery are tagged with a short note describing the origin of the maker.’
    • ‘Long rows of empty boots stretched across the plaza at the south end of the park, each pair tagged with the name of a fallen soldier.’
    • ‘Since the start of this project in 2003, four loggerheads have been tagged, fitted with transmitters, and released.’
    • ‘When staff pick up the nets, they note how many fish of each species are collected in which net webbing, measure each fish and tag and release some of those taken alive.’
    • ‘The bear was tagged before it was released, to show that it had been causing trouble.’
    • ‘They will tag and release the fish, and this gives you an opportunity to get a photo or two.’
    • ‘About four days before, Rose had left her larger suitcases, tagged and labeled with her name, waiting out on her front porch to be picked up and transported to camp ahead of her.’
    • ‘Since 1975, all outstanding trees and shrubs have been tagged and their common and Latin names recorded.’
    • ‘The trees will be tagged with the concerned person's name or after the person in whose name it is bought and people can actually visit their trees.’
    • ‘Each item must be tagged with the name and address of the passenger.’
    • ‘Tires, which are tagged individually and often rolled off trucks, present a host of challenges.’
    • ‘This leaves 135 live animals that were neither tagged nor photographed.’
    label, attach tags to, put a label on, mark, ticket, earmark, identify, docket, flag, indicate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Attach a monitoring tag to.
      ‘laser tattooing is used in the tagging of cattle’
      • ‘An average of 600 offenders are being electronically tagged each month compared to about 400 last year, the Home Office said yesterday.’
      • ‘Most other countries in the EU had their sheep tagged years ago.’
      • ‘Cars could be electronically tagged in a bid to pinpoint the county's worst traffic jam hot spots.’
      • ‘It used to be just criminals and pet dogs that were tagged electronically, but today children are the latest target for location-tracking technology.’
      • ‘In addition traceability was extended to the sheep sector with the introduction of individual sheep tagging.’
      • ‘Asylum seekers also face being electronically tagged to ease the pressure on detention centres.’
      • ‘Within weeks a family of four will be electronically tagged and moved in to the house as part of an experiment to see how they react to the innovative features that house-builders believe the modern lifestyle demands.’
      • ‘She will be electronically tagged for the first six months, to stop her leaving her home between 8pm and 6pm on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights.’
      • ‘They say the rule that requires every lamb to be individually tagged shows how little the bureaucrats understand about farming.’
      • ‘Persistent young offenders in York and North Yorkshire could be electronically tagged in a scheme to cut youth crime.’
      • ‘Thousands of offenders will be tagged on their release from jail under plans being considered by ministers to reduce reoffending rates.’
      • ‘Young criminals in Bradford could face being electronically tagged under a new £9 million scheme.’
      • ‘UK asylum seekers are to be electronically tagged as part of plans to introduce tougher immigration controls announced by the Home Office yesterday.’
      • ‘Hardcore teenage criminals will be electronically tagged or subjected to intensive surveillance under a tough new penalty being launched in South Yorkshire today.’
      • ‘Prior to the challenge test, the fish were kept under standard environmental conditions and individually tagged with passive integrated transponder tags.’
      • ‘He will be electronically tagged and was given a supervision order for six months.’
      • ‘I was amazed by the Green Party members during question time today when they were complaining about the Minister of Conservation tagging dolphins with an electronic tag that was to be picked up by satellite.’
      • ‘Parents who refuse to allow former partners contact with their children could be electronically tagged under plans being considered by ministers.’
      • ‘Those categorised in this way and who have served their punishment could then be electronically tagged upon their release, so their movements can be monitored.’
    2. 1.2with object and adverbial or complement Give a specified name or description to.
      ‘he left because he didn't want to be tagged as a soap star’
      • ‘Indeed, as the years go by the originals of subpoenaed smoking pistols themselves will slowly disappear, to the point where those claiming they ever existed can be safely tagged as crazed, deluded loons.’
      • ‘He has been tagged a ‘work in progress’ who is still learning the finer points of the linebacker position.’
      • ‘‘Right now, I don't think he's been around long enough to be tagged as a headhunter,’ Martinez says.’
      • ‘He was definitely not shaman material, they concluded, and assigned him the task of picking berries with the old women, who tagged him with the nickname he bore till the end of his days.’
      • ‘But he resists the quirky label he has been tagged with.’
      • ‘The real firebrands have tagged him as racist.’
      • ‘Economists with radical views often run the risk of being tagged with political labels.’
      • ‘For his efforts, he often gets tagged with labels that would dismiss him as a left-wing nut or an unpatriotic freak!’
      • ‘He has been tagged as the next great Broncos running back.’
      • ‘The ‘blame America first’ crowd is a label that right-wing extremists tagged on liberals to demonize and marginalize them.’
      • ‘He makes an outstanding catch a week ago and gets tagged with the label of perhaps owning the two most overrated defensive plays of all time.’
      • ‘I think everybody is just tagging him as an offensive coach.’
      • ‘We're both lefties, and we're both been tagged unfairly as no more than just shooters.’
      • ‘Someone who gets admitted to college with an ‘unearned advantage’ is forever tagged as inferior, regardless of skills.’
      • ‘And anyone who hasn't won a Stanley Cup is often tagged by harsh labels in this fast-paced, hard-checking and passionate game.’
      • ‘They can't risk being tagged as soft on enforcement.’
      • ‘When they stopped making their case to the broader community, they were tagged with the special-interest label.’
      • ‘Jurassic 5 are tagged as being hiphop revivalists, recalling the party era of rap.’
      • ‘At age 52, he talks with amusement at the labels people have tried to tag him with.’
      • ‘Once tagged with this label you need to find another career or move on.’
      designate, describe, identify, classify, label, class, categorize, characterize
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal (of a graffiti artist) write one's nickname or mark on (a surface)
      ‘storefronts are shuttered with metal roll-down barricades tagged with graffiti’
      • ‘Shops in Epsom are supporting the fight against vandals who blight the borough with their graffiti tags.’
      • ‘Since very few trains circulated, graffiti artists started tagging and painting entire subway trains.’
      • ‘Nothing looks worse than a fire which appears to be a transparent pyramid tagged by graffiti vandals.’
      • ‘I'm entirely on the side of graffiti artists who tag places that have a political resonance.’
      • ‘Instead of disappearing into the caricature of shadows of what they are supposed to be, by tagging, graffiti artists are defiantly re-naming themselves.’
    4. 1.4Computing Add an instruction to (a piece of text in a markup language) in order to specify how it is displayed or interpreted.
      • ‘My apologies for not html tagging this, but, well, I dunno how.’
      • ‘The S-bit is applied to code that needs to be secure, and a separate portion of an ARM processor monitors and identifies data tagged with an S-bit.’
      • ‘Audio could be tagged, but not downloaded easily.’
      • ‘When a file is downloaded to a user's player, it will be tagged in such a way that other players would then refuse to play it.’
      • ‘If tagging works well for VoIP then expect the same for video and audio, too.’
    5. 1.5 Add a word, phrase, or name to (digital content) to identify it as belonging to a particular category or concerning a particular person or topic.
      ‘I will be tagged in every photo I post’
    6. 1.6Chemistry Biology Label (something) with a radioactive isotope, fluorescent dye, or other marker.
      ‘pieces of DNA tagged with radioactive particles’
      • ‘Initially we wrote our applications on the assumption that we would do the work the conventional way, using radioactive labels to tag the DNA fragments and film to record the sequence from the gels.’
      • ‘Cells were then fixed, rinsed, and labeled with fluorescently tagged secondary antibodies as described above.’
      • ‘Cells expressing the permease tagged with GFP were observed under a fluorescent microscope.’
      • ‘Genotypes were obtained by automated sizing of fluorescently tagged polymerase chain reaction amplification products.’
      • ‘The stem cell was tagged with a fluorescent dye, allowing investigators to track and recover the cells descended from single cell transplanted into female mice.’
  • 2Add to something, especially as an afterthought or with no real connection.

    ‘she meant to tag her question on at the end of her remarks’
    • ‘He tagged on two conversions but the highlight was keeping a clean sheet.’
    • ‘Blakeley tagged on the conversion to put the Reds 6-2 in front.’
    • ‘He tagged on the two points to put them 6-0 up.’
    • ‘He forced his way over in the corner and Barnes tagged on a touchline conversion.’
    • ‘Lynam tagged on the two points to take the score to 16-0.’
    • ‘The flirtation with danger was worth it, however, as Harvey tagged on the extra two points.’
    • ‘He tagged on the extras, but it proved little more than consolation for the vanquished outfit.’
    add, tack, join
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1no object, with adverbial Follow or accompany someone, especially without invitation.
      ‘that'll teach you not to tag along where you're not wanted’
      • ‘I used to tag along behind him, but not just in golf; everything my Dad has enjoyed doing, I have as well.’
      • ‘They had no idea who I was, but were nice enough to let me tag along.’
      • ‘I thought if I hung round near one of the doors, when a large-ish group with a wad of tickets was going in, I'd tag along with the group as if I was one of them, and just sit anywhere.’
      • ‘And its always good if he notices so he can tag along as well…’
      • ‘The only unanswerable anti-war argument was the generally conservative, Little England case that it is no longer in Britain's interests to tag along behind the United States.’
      • ‘I tag along, nodding thoughtfully when I think a nod is called for.’
      • ‘He invited these two professional female dancer friends of his to tag along.’
      • ‘It wouldn't hurt to tag along and shadow her in her endeavors.’
      • ‘The only way, it seemed, that we could convince my buddies to tag along was to tell them that there was unlimited food and beer awaiting them.’
      • ‘Mickey is still there and, realizing that this past version of Jack does not know him, convinces Jack to let him tag along.’
      • ‘But this of course still presents a huge problem - who's going to believe that a hitman would allow a cameraman to tag along with him and film him murdering people?’
      • ‘And all you curious bystanders are welcome to tag along!’
      • ‘One kid always used to tag along, unwanted, made fun of, yet somehow of greater indispensability than any of the rest of us.’
      • ‘But I spend a lot of time these days in the playground area of our local parks and it makes sense for Zippy to tag along and get his daily walks at the same time.’
      • ‘I had to tag along with her each time she went to the classes.’
      • ‘I would tag along, listening, a small shadow absorbing a vision of a much better land beyond.’
      • ‘Starla welcomes her into her home and Genevieve gets to tag along at school, but cunning Genevieve is plotting to undermine Starla, steal her boyfriend and even her place in the cheerleading team.’
      • ‘If you're curious about the Titanic, you might want to tag along.’
      • ‘I explained that I worked for a small newspaper and that I wanted to tag along for the day to see what being an army recruiter is all about.’
      • ‘As a kid, I'd tag along with Dad as he did the chores around the farm.’
      follow, trail
      View synonyms
  • 3Shear away ragged locks of wool from (sheep).

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a narrow hanging section of a decoratively slashed garment): of unknown origin; compare with dag. The verb dates from the early 17th century.

Pronunciation

tag

/tæɡ//taɡ/

Main definitions of tag in US English:

: tag1tag2

tag2

noun

  • 1A children's game in which one chases the rest, and anyone who is touched then becomes the pursuer.

    • ‘They walked down the street, which still had children playing tag, softball, and other games.’
    • ‘A memory of running around with Ewen as children, playing tag and wrestling each other to the ground with peals of laughter, flashed through her mind.’
    • ‘They were walking until they got so bored they decided to start a game of tag.’
    • ‘It was like tag; she was chasing, and our server was losing.’
    • ‘They spent the next hour riding the waves and finished with a quick game of tag.’
    • ‘A game of tag is a great way to get children to practice both running and dodging.’
    • ‘Children played a lively game of tag around his legs.’
    • ‘Clements's favorite is the most venerable game of all: tag.’
    • ‘Today the coach decided she would treat us by having us play a game of flag tag.’
    • ‘Ballgames, bikes, scooters and a seeming unending game of tag keep the decibels up.’
    • ‘After school I raced in Dara Park with Lisa and Charvella, playing freeze tag and other games years too young for me.’
    • ‘Speed frequently determines who is safe or out, who is caught during games of tag, or who will win the race.’
    • ‘We were running around in the backyard after a shower and mother told us to go play off some of our energy, so we walked out of our house in Malibu and immediately shot into a run for a game of tag.’
    • ‘The joys were in simple games - hopscotch, hide-and-go-seek, tag, etc.’
    • ‘But not many came this way it was to far out from any forms or life but the sand crabs that were running around, it looked like they were playing a child's game of tag.’
    • ‘There was an elderly woman who sat on a small chair, close to the entrance of her tiny wooden house as she watched her two grandchildren run around the road, enjoying their little game of tag.’
    • ‘Humming to himself, he continued his game of tag and having the time of his life.’
    • ‘One day, we were out running around, playing tag.’
    • ‘There were children running around, laughing and chasing each other in a game that looked like tag.’
    • ‘The girls stopped spinning and began chasing each other in an impromptu game of freeze tag.’
    1. 1.1Baseball The action of tagging out a runner or tagging a base.
      ‘he narrowly avoided a sweeping tag by the first baseman’
      • ‘The phantom tag at second base is another maneuver that big league middle infielders have mastered on steal plays.’
      • ‘Members of the defensive team need to be aware of an inadvertent or accidental tag of home plate by the catcher in such situations.’
      • ‘Baseball does have an arm extension interpretation when a runner tries to avoid a fielder's tag.’
      • ‘I strongly believe that the language of the rule needs to be amended to explain the necessity of a tag when runners advance at their own risk after an Infield Fly is called.’
    2. 1.2as modifier Denoting a form of wrestling involving tag teams.
      • ‘They toppled the Rockers in tag title matches through their switching of partners illegally.’
      • ‘You were speaking of tag matches - this old tape had so many!’
      • ‘And any male could get the Women's belt and anyone could get the tag belts as long as there are two people.’
      • ‘They can be a great tag team in the future and maybe one day win the tag titles.’
      • ‘Los Guerreros won the tag titles and held them for a short period of time.’
      • ‘Whatever happened to spending years in the tag ranks honing your skills and then going single?’
      • ‘His multiple title reigns in both singles and team tag competition.’
      • ‘The tag match was cool and only because of the ending the rest was just flat.’
      • ‘With this much competition for the belts, there won't be time for more of those poorly booked six man tag matches.’
      • ‘The tag matches were rushed and wasted since they did not build to anything.’
      • ‘They also brought back the tag ropes that were on hiatus for awhile.’
      • ‘When they had the tag belts, Owen would always be sure that he would be a couple of steps behind us before we came out.’
      • ‘The tag title match was solid, though kinda short, and Eddy needs to be used better.’
      • ‘Daniels and Morgan pulled out the win in that bout and won the tag titles, but was your opinion on how that match turned out?’
      • ‘Since there isn't much of a tag division we are left with those 2 teams.’
      • ‘William Regal and Eugene have also become popular, and now reign as the tag champs.’
      • ‘I knew he was a former WCW tag champion, was a great athlete, and was a young guy willing to learn.’
      • ‘It wasn't a bad match or anything, but these tag matches are literally all the same.’
      • ‘Here Vince gives you the option of forming a tag team and going for the tag titles.’
      • ‘The women's tag match surprised me, especially with Lita not having worked in over a year.’

verb

[with object]
  • 1Touch (someone being chased) in a game of tag.

    • ‘He tags her, and she then dances back across to tap a boy.’
    • ‘Instead of a player tagging you, you have to tag them!’
    • ‘The small girl squealed as she tagged me on the back.’
    • ‘He couldn't let himself be tagged, then he would have to chase, instead of being chased.’
    • ‘Freeze tag is a game where one person is selected to chase and tag the others.’
    1. 1.1tag outBaseball Put out (a runner) by touching them with the ball or with the glove holding the ball.
      ‘catching their fastest runner in a rundown and tagging him out’
      • ‘The boy ran to home base and tagged a runner running in.’
      • ‘In the commotion, he took a big turn around second base and was tagged out.’
      • ‘If Jeter says he tagged the runner, he tagged the runner.’
      • ‘As the pitcher straddles the rubber and the runner takes his lead, the first baseman tags the runner.’
      • ‘The Pirates' defense fired the ball to third where Bond was surprisingly tagged out.’
    2. 1.2Baseball (of a base runner, or a fielder with the ball) touch (a base) with the foot.
      ‘the short center fielder could field the ball and tag second base for a force out’
      • ‘Here's why: By catching the deep fly, the outfielder allows the runner on third to tag and score easily.’
      • ‘Cyclones first baseman Ian Bladergroen, made an over-the-shoulder catch on the run, and the runners tagged.’
      • ‘Since time had been called before Howe went over to tag second base, Harvey disallowed that putout, and returned McBride to second base.’
    3. 1.3usually tag upBaseball no object (of a base runner) touch the base one has occupied after a fly ball is caught, before running to the next base.
      ‘when the ball was hit, he went back to the bag to tag up’

Origin

Mid 18th century: perhaps a variant of tig.

Pronunciation

tag

/tæɡ//taɡ/