Definition of T-bone in English:

T-bone

noun

  • A large choice piece of loin steak containing a T-shaped bone.

    • ‘There are one-plate meals for those who don't want to eat from the varied three course menu, including a T-bone steak at £10.50 and wholesome fare such as scampi, chicken kievs and turkey at around the £5 mark.’
    • ‘Top items at B.395 were a mixed grill or a T-bone steak.’
    • ‘He actually got a T-bone steak, but Price was touched when he sent word back saying how much he liked the meal.’
    • ‘That's not a serving of pizza - it's a T-bone steak dinner with salad and a baked potato sprinkled with a teaspoon of salt.’
    • ‘Most cuisines have examples of this, for instance, the American T-bone steak, the French escalope, the Middle Eastern kebab, and the thin slices cut for stir-frying in Chinese cookery.’
    • ‘Even without the filling soup as a first course, the T-bone steak and salad had been an excellent meal.’
    • ‘Main courses are next with sautéed mussels, chicken breast, pork steaks, T-bones, sea-bass and veal escallops, with everything cooked in a variety of aromatic Italian herbs and spices, and of course, lots of garlic.’
    • ‘They call it T-bone because it looks like a T-bone steak, like you're hitting a perpendicular head-on.’
    • ‘Had a T-bone steak for dinner as we arrive at Chipley.’
    • ‘To my surprise, the kitchen provided me with a T-bone steak in place of Buxton's preferred filet mignon.’
    • ‘Many find it too soft for their tastes, unlike the distinctive T-bone steak which derives flavour from the dividing bone.’
    • ‘I don't know what we're doing with our beef in Australia but we had the best T-bone steak we'd ever had in Africa.’
    • ‘I once ordered a T-bone steak that completely covered the platter.’
    • ‘I could go to dinner and have a T-bone steak and mashed potatoes and gravy and this and that, and you know, that wasn't that hard for me to eat.’
    • ‘Careful Kitty's Cafe, the coffee shop at the El Cortez, serves a T-bone steak or prime rib dinner for $5.95 from midnight to 7 a.m. every day.’
    • ‘He was eating a T-bone steak when he saw Randy sitting at the bar drinking a malted soda.’
    • ‘The tender steaks are rib, rib-eye, T-bone, porterhouse, tenderloin, sirloin and strip loin.’
    • ‘You'd be going to your car, talking about your trip that you still have to make, talking about the T-bone steak you had inside the Ponderosa.’
    • ‘Bone-in cuts, like T-bone or porterhouse steaks, may pose a very, very slight risk.’
    • ‘And safe journey and happy travels go out to Jervey who is probably tucking into a T-bone steak stateside.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]North american
informal
  • Crash head-on into the side of (another vehicle)

    ‘his car rolled over and was T-boned by an oncoming vehicle’
    • ‘An upsurge of magnetism in your personal and professional relationships will see an old flame return to your life, T-boning a tanker and showering the stolen SUV with pure gasoline!’
    • ‘Yes I like that one a lot better then getting T-boned by another car, and barely surviving.’
    • ‘I was gonna write this paragraph about how her car had been T-boned, and all this other stuff.’
    • ‘He told the police later that he didn't want to kill old people or the very young, so he ran a red light and T-boned a twenty five year old son of a Fox 2 News reporter, killing him instantly.’
    • ‘Tagliani T-boned him at nearly 200 mph, the hard carbon-fibre bullet nose of his 1,550-pound missile striking Zanardi's car between the left front wheel and the cockpit with such force that it blew away the front of the chassis.’
    • ‘He failed to stop at the stop street and T-boned a car travelling down Maitland Road.’
    • ‘Title contender Jeff Gordon, who was running behind those two, had nowhere to go and T-boned Hillenburg's car.’
    • ‘Jimmy Ng was killed on the job in September of 2002 when his police cruiser was T-boned by a speeding car.’
    • ‘In 1972, en route to the Ebonite Edge Classic in Berkley, Mich., she was a passenger in a car that was T-boned on the passenger side by a young driver.’
    • ‘In the first case, Kitty L. was T-boned on the driver's side of her car, and she suffered neck tenderness with some spasm and back soreness.’
    • ‘At the end block I turned and dallied in some side streets, expecting the Yukon to come blasting through a snowdrift and T-bone me into a body cast.’
    • ‘One of the traffic experts quoted observed that it was much better to be rear-ended at 10 mph than T-boned at 40; true enough, I suppose.’
    • ‘And yesterday I was very nearly T-boned by someone who had sailed through a red light.’
    • ‘The charges date back to Sept. 16, 2002 when Ng's squad car was T-boned by a speeding 2003 Honda Civic at the intersection of Williams and No. 3 Road.’
    • ‘In 1974, having a good-sized car saved my life when I got T-boned on my driver's side door by a humongous truck.’
    • ‘In cars, side-curtain airbags protect the heads of drivers and passengers when getting T-boned by an SUV or pickup truck.’
    • ‘I couldn't swerve to the right because I then would T-bone the truck.’
    • ‘Wylie always told himself that Maddy was invincible out there - he couldn't afford to think about it any other way - but seeing her come so close to getting T-boned rattled him.’
    • ‘One such accident, where a three year old 9-5 that failed to stop at a major road had been T-boned more or less side on by a Toyota Hiace van, was the subject of Saab's safety seminar.’
    • ‘I was getting 100 km using just a litre of petrol when I T-boned a bus.’

Pronunciation:

T-bone

/ˈtēˌbōn/