Definition of synecdochic in US English:

synecdochic

adjective

  • See synecdoche

    • ‘The body as possessed by the knowledge of writing becomes a writer's body, part of the writing, a synecdochic body.’
    • ‘In the English writing of India, the emperor quickly becomes the locus of the civilized/barbaric binary and via this synecdochic function Mogul culture becomes figured as simultaneously civilized and barbaric.’
    • ‘The six films resurrect, continue, and conclude the story of the Enterprise through the use of a synecdochic narrative.’
    • ‘In Ireland, I would argue, there is a metaphorical and, more specifically, a synecdochic similarity between the fetus' relationship to the mother and Ireland's relationship to Europe.’
    • ‘Given that representations always stand at a distance from the objects they represent what we find is the synecdochic presence of domestic workers in the reminiscences of the Bengali middle-class.’

Pronunciation

synecdochic

/ˌsinekˈdäkik/