Definition of syndicate in English:

syndicate

noun

Pronunciation /ˈsindikət//ˈsɪndɪkət/
  • 1A group of individuals or organizations combined to promote some common interest.

    ‘large-scale buyouts involving a syndicate of financial institutions’
    ‘a crime syndicate’
    • ‘Bonds can be issued through individuals or syndicates.’
    • ‘So far as the individual syndicate was concerned, the effect of the spiral was to magnify many times the impact of a particular loss.’
    • ‘The move came after three syndicates revealed a combined total burden of £135m for claims.’
    • ‘The police say there are 238 criminal syndicates operating in the country and across its borders.’
    • ‘We have not explored the way in which estimates were made by individual syndicates or individual auditors.’
    • ‘By contrast, the syndicates of private investors have become more ambitious.’
    • ‘The 270 members of the Chamber of Counselors are selected by local councils, professional organizations, and labor syndicates for nine-year terms.’
    • ‘Servicing the debts will obviously involve a net transfer from the company to the syndicate of lenders, not the shareholders.’
    • ‘In larger transactions, a syndicate of venture capital houses or private equity firms might combine to provide the equity finance.’
    • ‘Individual private investors tend to buy either on their own, or in syndicates organised by intermediaries with up to 20 investors in any one deal.’
    • ‘Accountability was also non-existent and officials became easy targets for organised crime syndicates.’
    • ‘It is a lucrative business for the syndicate involved.’
    • ‘The furthering of agricultural settlements financed by joint-stock companies, syndicates, and individuals symbolized the beginning of a conceptual triumph over the long-standing tradition of piracy.’
    • ‘Most land is private property and owned by large business syndicates and individuals.’
    • ‘Tell me how can an illegal gambling syndicate operate and flourish with police as patrons?’
    • ‘He said the suspect was a member of an international drug syndicate.’
    • ‘Most of the action is initiated by injuries, assorted rumors, and betting syndicates.’
    • ‘The new venture will deliver commercial property investment opportunities in Ireland and abroad to Irish individual, syndicates, intermediaries and advisers.’
    • ‘Some of these syndicates provide a tax advantage, allowing individuals to invest through their pension contributions.’
    • ‘But there are cheaper ways of ownership, such as joining a syndicate.’
    business, place of business, premises, firm, company, concern, enterprise, venture, organization, operation, undertaking, industry
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An association or agency supplying material simultaneously to a number of newspapers or periodicals.
      • ‘In the meanwhile, newspapers are in trouble and are all too happy to pick up criticism from their affiliated syndicates.’
      • ‘He promptly sent ‘The Boondocks’ off to make the rounds of the news syndicates, and Universal picked him up.’
      • ‘Indeed, Stromberg cites Aaron McGruder's ‘The Boondocks’ as a major challenge to the old world order of cartoon syndicates.’
      • ‘At any rate, I was a bit worried all day that I was going to lose my hall pass, and kept asking my friends who have real jobs with newspapers and syndicates and such if they had an extra holder, to no avail.’
      • ‘There's a common perception in the West that the only way to become a financially successful cartoonist is to get the newspaper syndicates to pick you up.’
      • ‘Ironically, online news sites become even more dependent on news agency wholesalers and features syndicates to fill the expanded news hole.’
      • ‘In the world of newspapers, a syndicate distributes information to subscribers, allowing each publication to tailor the content of information it receives.’
      • ‘At any rate, its campaign against me included flash-floods of e-mail intended to shut down servers at my newspaper and my syndicate, as well as viruses aimed at my home computer.’
      • ‘No newspaper or syndicate in their right mind should be letting this hateful attempt at humor grace their pages.’
      • ‘His syndicate declined to publish the second of the two columns.’
      • ‘Are these stories generated locally or do they come from other sources such as syndicates, wire services or other newspapers?’
      • ‘Always the editor is responsible for touching the ethical line with the writer, members say, whether that is an editor of a single newspaper's editorial page or of a syndicate.’
      • ‘The mushrooming of political parties, syndicates, and newspapers signals a nascent political pluralism upon which democracy can be built.’
      • ‘The editor at your syndicate said that of the 6,500 submissions they get every year, they take only two or three.’
      society, association, union, alliance, institution, league, guild, coalition, affiliation, consortium, fraternity, order, body, community, club, circle, lodge, clan, set, clique, coterie
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A committee of syndics.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
Pronunciation /ˈsɪndəˌkeɪt//ˈsindəˌkāt/
  • 1Control or manage by a syndicate.

    ‘the loans are syndicated to a group of banks’
    • ‘$44 billion of U.S. syndicated loans were announced last week, the largest amount in four months.’
    • ‘In addition, lenders are now able to issue more debt without needing to syndicate to other banks.’
    • ‘For good reason, the buyers of these syndicated loans are reassessing their involvement.’
    • ‘They're then bundled, or syndicated, in the secondary market.’
    • ‘The background in this case means the commercial world in which syndicated loans were made in 1997, and particularly the extent to which debts created by such loans were traded in a ‘secondary market’ of debt traders.’
    • ‘Similarly, the banks themselves who lent these companies the money to fund their expansion in the first instance are finding it difficult to spread the risk by syndicating the loans to other banks.’
    • ‘It also appears that syndicated bank lending has come to life over the past few weeks.’
    • ‘Often a commercial bank will syndicate a large loan by forming a credit group made up of a number of other banks, with each bank providing a certain percentage of the total loan.’
    • ‘It is relatively recently, only, that solicitors could syndicate loans, I think.’
    • ‘He signed an agreement to borrow a 75 million euro two-year loan syndicated by 18 banks, an unprecedented number of creditors for Bulgaria.’
    • ‘The Bank of England governor attempted to syndicate a rescue throughout the weekend.’
    • ‘Firms syndicate risks in the design, development, production and distribution of healthcare products and services where profits are indicated.’
    • ‘It normally works with local banks and has syndicated financing to a number of medium and large projects in infrastructure, manufacturing, property and fisheries.’
    • ‘A growing number of individuals are joining syndicated funds to buy commercial and residential property portfolios which give regular rental income and capital growth as property prices appreciate.’
    • ‘The 7,430 square metre building is being bought for €14.1 million by Harvest Financial Services, which will syndicate the investment.’
    • ‘We syndicate stores for retailers, which have fixed-price as their model.’
    • ‘The consortium has been granted a five year syndicated loan of 450 million euro and another one year loan of 200 million euro to finance the buy out.’
    • ‘Asian corporations outside of Japan have raised some $92 billion through equity initial public offerings, international bond issues and syndicated loans so far this year.’
    affiliate, align, connect, join, join up, join forces, attach, combine, team up, band together, be in league, ally, form an alliance, federate, consolidate, incorporate, conjoin, merge, integrate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Publish or broadcast (material) simultaneously in a number of newspapers, television stations, etc.
      ‘his reports were syndicated to 200 other papers’
      • ‘Her music has also been broadcast on two nationally syndicated radio programs.’
      • ‘In the 1960s I wrote a Catholic column syndicated to ten diocesan newspapers.’
      • ‘United Media syndicates many of the most popular newspaper comic strips, and showcases all its assets for free at Comics.com.’
      • ‘If you're syndicating an old show and a few episodes are absent, that may go unnoticed.’
      • ‘People will not usually want to syndicate your content until you establish a reputation.’
      • ‘It doesn't fit in with the current economic model of TV, which is: make money on the first run, and then make more money by syndicating the show.’
      • ‘Most syndicated hosts started local and then moved into syndication with a different program.’
      • ‘But reportage has not been limited to the major TV networks and syndicated radio programs.’
      • ‘I'd write one review, which I would syndicate to local newspapers all over Britain.’
      • ‘He also hosts a daily radio program syndicated to more than 300 stations nationwide.’
      • ‘Today it is the world's most widely syndicated comic strip, appearing in 2,570 newspapers.’
      • ‘One of the things we're finding is people need access to the kind of content we have to build up their unrelated businesses, and we can syndicate our content and get paid and get some equity, and can promote our artists more.’
      • ‘Today, the 67-year-old still writes a twice-weekly advice column for the Washington Post, which is syndicated across the States.’
      • ‘There were no tournament games on network television, just syndicated broadcasts of an occasional game.’
      • ‘One of his points: a lot of newspapers and broadcasters will open their archives and many will syndicate their material.’
      • ‘His weekly newspaper column is syndicated through King features Syndicate.’
      • ‘Syndicated hosts say they also cover localities, but they must always relate such attention to a national issue.’
      • ‘Later the cartoon was syndicated to 2400 newspapers in dozens of countries, reaching an audience of more than 355 million people.’
      • ‘But, at some point, he says, Progress Media will expand by syndicating its shows to other stations.’
      • ‘There is even a section for encouraging specific submitted sites to syndicate their content.’
    2. 1.2 Sell (a horse) to a syndicate.
      ‘the stallion was syndicated for a record $5.4 million’
      • ‘The six-year-old son of Silver Ghost will be syndicated and stand for $3,000.’
      • ‘A written business plan may also help you obtain bank financing, expansion, bring in partners or syndicate a horse.’
      • ‘Despite Say Florida Sandy's age, Downey has hopes he can syndicate the hard-knocking horse.’
      • ‘‘We never really talk about the syndication price, but he has been fully syndicated,’ Farish said.’
      • ‘Plans call for him to be sold or syndicated for stud duty.’
      • ‘The four-year-old son of Runaway Groom will be syndicated and stand the 2004 season for $7,500.’
      • ‘Plans call for War Emblem to be sent to Japan, where he will be syndicated, after he runs in the Breeders' Cup Classic on October 26 at Arlington Park.’
      • ‘They have to get together and decide if he would stand at Diamond A, or be syndicated, or stand at another farm.’
      • ‘He will be syndicated and will stand for $8,500 at Wafare.’
      • ‘He's not going to be syndicated, and we should be ready to announce the stud fee soon.’
      • ‘He confirmed that the colts will stand at Vinery Kentucky and will be syndicated.’
      • ‘Palique will be syndicated for a sum reportedly nearing $150,000.’
      • ‘The four-year-old Kingmambo colt will be syndicated and stand his initial season for a fee of $6,860 at Haras de Victot near Normandy.’
      • ‘After a successful racing career, Polish Numbers entered stud in 1992 as the first horse syndicated by Northview Stallion Station to stand at the former Windfield Farms.’
      • ‘The Michael Bell-trained colt was syndicated earlier this month for £6million to stand at the Royal Stud at Sandringham.’
      • ‘The decision is met with widespread criticism in the States, with the detractors pointing to the relatively unserious nature of the injury and the recent deal the owners had made to syndicate the horse for breeding.’
      • ‘Keltos will be syndicated and stand in France or in Ireland, the trainer said.’
      • ‘Industry sources said the real damage would be done to smaller players in the breeding industry who syndicate stallions in order to reduce the risk.’
      • ‘The National Stud plans to syndicate both Pastoral Pursuits and Bahamian Bounty.’
      • ‘They've already turned down millions to sell or syndicate Alex and kept him running.’

Origin

Early 17th century (denoting a committee of syndics): from French syndicat, from medieval Latin syndicatus, from late Latin syndicus ‘delegate of a corporation’ (see syndic). Current verb senses date from the late 19th century.

Pronunciation

syndicate

Noun/ˈsɪndɪkət/

syndicate

Verb/ˈsɪndəˌkeɪt/