Definition of syndicalism in English:

syndicalism

noun

historical
  • A movement for transferring the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution to workers' unions. Influenced by Proudhon and by the French social philosopher Georges Sorel (1847–1922), syndicalism developed in French labor unions during the late 19th century and was at its most vigorous between 1900 and 1914, particularly in France, Italy, Spain, and the US.

    • ‘His arrest and eventual acquittal on charges of sedition strengthened militant convictions that he took back to Britain in 1910 and pursued through syndicalism and then communism.’
    • ‘This party was strongly oriented toward syndicalism and viewed the international conflict over program and principles with contempt.’
    • ‘Others inside the party nurtured hopes of a return to past Stalinist glories or some form of militant syndicalism.’
    • ‘The workers responded by looking to the most radical ideas available - those of syndicalism.’
    • ‘Once again, this stance expresses political passivity, this time dressed up in the garb of militant syndicalism.’

Origin

Early 20th century: from French syndicalisme, from syndical, from syndic a delegate (see syndic).

Pronunciation:

syndicalism

/ˈsindəkəˌlizəm/