Definition of swindle in English:

swindle

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Use deception to deprive (someone) of money or possessions.

    ‘a businessman swindled investors out of millions of dollars’
    • ‘Then we hear about widespread accounting malpractices, even in giant corporations, and start to wonder if this is not a huge conspiracy to swindle us out of our money.’
    • ‘In fact, he has swindled his own family by managing to become the sole inheritor of their grandparents' estate.’
    • ‘The Government has pledged to crack down on unscrupulous doorstep salesmen who swindle vulnerable pensioners out of thousands of pounds.’
    • ‘It's estimated that patients were swindled out of some $12,750,000 from August / 96 to February / 03.’
    • ‘Sometimes, the employers will even attempt to swindle their potential employees.’
    • ‘I bought this system from you believing you to be a reputable firm and I can plainly see you've swindled me out of my money’
    • ‘In 1989 he pleaded guilty to 55 counts of fraud, allegedly swindling elderly victims in Virginia and Tennessee out of around $1.25 million.’
    • ‘A serial conman who swindled victims out of more than £1million told a judge that he blew £64,000 on exotic foreign holidays.’
    • ‘He failed not simply because he was swindled, but also because he was stupid.’
    • ‘While these men were not above occasionally swindling other working-class people, for the most part their actions were directed at the region's elites.’
    • ‘It quickly becomes evident this blind man is far from helpless, as he proceeds to swindle the gangsters out of all their money.’
    • ‘I felt sorry for those poor desperate people being swindled in such a way.’
    • ‘I admit I live by my wits a lot, but I don't use them to swindle people.’
    • ‘The so-called ‘phishing’ scams have developed as a popular technique for fraudsters to swindle people out of everything from PayPal accounts to ATM codes.’
    • ‘For example, if I find a way of legally swindling you out of a lot of money, I cannot claim that my action is morally acceptable just because it is legal.’
    • ‘Most victims were swindled into paying €3,000 or more.’
    • ‘I don't condone cheats and con artists who swindle innocent victims out of their hard-earned cash.’
    • ‘She swindled eight people out of $111,000 in cash and jewelry before she was stopped.’
    • ‘If that does not happen, unscrupulous traders will rush into villages and swindle desperate peasant farmers of their hard-earned crop.’
    • ‘The group is suspected of having swindled each customer out of about 50,000 yen in such fees.’
    1. 1.1 Obtain (money) fraudulently.
      ‘he was said to have swindled $62.5 million from the pension fund’
      • ‘This performance of theirs was just a ploy to swindle a few dollars out of travelers and adventurers and nothing more.’
      • ‘He is also facing charges of embezzling a compensation fund for war victims and is being investigated for swindling a veterans' trust fund.’
      • ‘He uses Moliere's play to make a film inside a film about hypocrisy (specifically swindling money from wealthy people using a disguise).’
      • ‘He was sentenced by a state judge to seven and a half years for swindling $650 million from investors who bought stock through his New York brokerage.’
      • ‘Those who swindle money in banks are like parasites.’
      • ‘He allegedly swindled funds meant for building a culvert and a school.’
      • ‘That was the case in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where scam artists swindled more than $1.5 million from their victims.’
      • ‘A head teacher accused of being in a plot to swindle thousands of pounds out of school funds in a scam involving a builder, yesterday insisted he was ‘not dishonest in any way’.’
      • ‘Police in Shanghai have cracked a gang of four who swindled money using short messaging service on cell phones.’
      • ‘Discarded papers found by bag-raiders can be used to swindle millions of pounds a year from bank accounts in identity and credit fraud.’
      • ‘In both cases he's arguably signed contracts with the intention to swindle money.’
      • ‘This bizarre social phenomenon comes to light with the recent arrest of a con man for swindling around 100 million won from some 150 people.’
      • ‘A former headteacher who swindled £500,000 from school funds was led from her home by paramedics after failing to appear in court to be sentenced.’
      • ‘In 2001, a few newspapers carried stories on local securities firms swindling money from investors but soon all fell silent.’
      defraud, cheat, trick, fleece, dupe, deceive, rook, exploit, squeeze, milk, bleed
      fool, take advantage of, mislead, delude, hoax, hoodwink, bamboozle, string along
      embezzle
      do, con, sting, diddle, fiddle, swizzle, swizz, rip off, take for a ride, pull a fast one on, pull the wool over someone's eyes, put one over on, sell a pup to, take to the cleaners, bilk, gull, finagle, gazump
      stiff, euchre, bunco, hornswoggle
      cozen, sharp
      mulct
      View synonyms

noun

  • A fraudulent scheme or action.

    ‘he is mixed up in a $10 million insurance swindle’
    • ‘Q. Have you ever been on the wrong end of a swindle or scam?’
    • ‘The inability of the regulators to prevent scams and swindles has also brought the private pension industry into disrepute.’
    • ‘A fraudster jailed after making a fortune from masterminding a timeshare swindle could be forced to pay £80 million to his victims.’
    • ‘The fact that people have been scammed for ‘hundreds of years’ doesn't justify your continuing the swindle!’
    • ‘Were they just perpetrating swindles for their salaries?’
    • ‘It doesn't matter if the state abetted the swindle by finding the swindler innocent in a fixed trial.’
    • ‘Indeed, both men led famous swindles on the citizens they governed.’
    • ‘But the federal and state agencies have ZERO interest in the swindle that's being perpetrated.’
    • ‘Online crimes can include multimillion-dollar swindles, online auction scams, and piracy of software and other copyrighted material.’
    • ‘It's a total scam, swindle, and fake, but no one in our consumer agencies has any intention of doing anything about it.’
    • ‘To protect yourself against any of these possible swindles you need to be prudent in your investment decisions.’
    • ‘When high street banks offer 0.1% annual interest, how can anyone offer nearly 500 times as much without straying into frauds or swindles?’
    • ‘It is a sales gimmick, a cheat, a swindle, a scam.’
    • ‘It was also part of a stock swindle involving hundreds of millions of dollars on the Montreal Stock Exchange.’
    • ‘Of course we all want to be able to detect the lie, the cheat, the swindle, the manipulation.’
    • ‘They are accomplices of the dealer - a part of the swindle.’
    • ‘I want this advertising stopped as a swindle.’
    • ‘These people are clearly criminals and have perpetrated a massive swindle against thousands of Americans, and become fantastically rich as a result.’
    • ‘He will get fatter and nervier, simply because our system turns a blind eye to such a swindle.’
    • ‘One company is being investigated in connection with an alleged swindle involving close to €30 million.’
    fraud, trick, deception, deceit, trickery, chicanery, exploitation, cheat, imposture, sham, sharp practice, artifice
    ruse, dodge, racket, wile
    con trick, con, sting, diddle, rip-off, fiddle, flimflam, swizzle, swizz
    bunco
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 18th century: back-formation from swindler, from German Schwindler extravagant maker of schemes, swindler from schwindeln be giddy also tell lies.

Pronunciation:

swindle

/ˈswindl/