Definition of swagger in English:

swagger

verb

  • no object , with adverbial of direction Walk or behave in a very confident and typically arrogant or aggressive way.

    ‘he swaggered along the corridor’
    ‘a swaggering gait’
    • ‘It's not just a question of how the president walks or swaggers or how he talks.’
    • ‘Spike swaggers closer: I was only looking in the slayer's direction because you wouldn't give me the time of day.’
    • ‘However, it is Ejiofor's film as he swaggers around in heels or confronts the ghosts of the past with equal aplomb.’
    • ‘He swaggers to the counter, orders, and waits for his drink.’
    • ‘A flashily dressed man comes swaggering down the street, talking loudly into a mobile phone.’
    • ‘I just can't stand the man's style, the way he swaggers and struts and smirks and the way he looks sly and deceitful and the way Americans can't see it.’
    • ‘With a propane tank over his shoulder and the little boy tugging at his arm, McCarthy swaggered towards the tracks.’
    • ‘And then staggered and swaggered along with Flint, Carl and TJ our way to Emma's for dinner and to meet Gina's brother Aubrey.’
    • ‘He held this position for 10 seconds, after which he swaggered forth.’
    • ‘An outsider can feel it too, when a soldier swaggers up to your vehicle and orders the bonnet to be opened.’
    • ‘I was gathering my things when Skinner walked, no swaggered up to my locker and coolly kicked the left corner.’
    • ‘As he swaggers into the Citizens' Theatre, the 24-year-old is in personal and professional rude health.’
    • ‘The driver swaggers into the club and slaps Tony on the back.’
    • ‘As they mooched off, one straggler swaggering along behind the others tried to do an oh-so-cool spit onto the grass.’
    • ‘They strutted and swaggered in Creolestyle, played the hottest of jazz and slowed to a dead march as the tempo changed.’
    • ‘He swaggered as he walked towards her, then sat down on the bench.’
    • ‘After a lot of tick-ticking from my bright orange watch, Tyler walked, no, swaggered over, brandishing a scrap of paper triumphantly.’
    • ‘There is no better way to relax than to watch a cat - sleeping, stretching, or swaggering along.’
    • ‘The Doctor walked - no, not walked, swaggered - over to me.’
    • ‘The way the leader swaggered around as he walked made me frown a little since I had seen people like him in almost every school I had attended.’
    strut, parade, stride, roll, prance
    boast, brag, bray, bluster, crow, gloat, parade, strut, posture, pose, blow one's own trumpet, lord it
    View synonyms

noun

  • A very confident and typically arrogant or aggressive gait or manner.

    ‘they strolled around the camp with an exaggerated swagger’
    • ‘Our sales hero comes alone, wielding an arrogant swagger.’
    • ‘After years of hard-earned success on Broadway, where audiences lapped up their chaotic, anything-goes approach, the brothers arrived in Hollywood with an arrogant swagger.’
    • ‘Have we got what it takes to trip the loutish swagger of the Coalition's stormtroopers?’
    • ‘There is something of an arrogant swagger about Ibrahimovic.’
    • ‘Taylor has become one of the vocal leaders of the Miami defense and shows the confident swagger of the great Hurricane defenders.’
    • ‘Episodic material consists of scales and arpeggios that enhance the music's powerful images - ocean swells, billowing sails, even a sea captain's swagger.’
    • ‘More than the sum of her swagger, drawl and thousand nervous gestures, she embodies her character so seamlessly that the film's artifice seems to disappear.’
    • ‘Jason stepped down onto the garage floor, a confident swagger in his step.’
    • ‘Either because it's the truth, or because he enjoys the macho swagger, he has said he feels sad when affairs come to an end but he insists his heart has never been broken.’
    • ‘He saw enough in Hicks to remind him of the nihilistic swagger of Bruce.’
    • ‘But while a swagger of smug certainty plays well on television, prudence might argue for an open mind and the occasional flicker of doubt.’
    • ‘A goal ahead after four minutes, two up after 19, his players were coasting, and playing with the confident swagger of a team who knew it, when everything unravelled with alarming simplicity.’
    • ‘And with billions to spend, it gives them a certain swagger.’
    • ‘He approached McGrath with a swagger and challenged him with the question, ‘Am I not the greatest bowler you've ever seen?’’
    • ‘The Saints duly went marching in, although it was more of a triumphal swagger in the end, and it seemed that everyone in Paisley wanted to be in that number, which of course was one.’
    • ‘One exchange neatly sums up the swagger of the young, high, stupid and heavily armed.’
    • ‘Smit slowly walked back to his chair with an arrogant swagger.’
    • ‘Their backs when pushing forward had an arrogant swagger which comes with real talent.’
    • ‘As he twirls again, an officer's sword highlights the confident swagger of today's military man about town.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, he captures the music's masculine swagger right from the very first chord.’
    strut, parading, roll, prancing
    boasting, bragging, bluster, bumptiousness, brashness, swashbuckling, vainglory, puffery
    View synonyms

adjective

  • attributive Denoting a coat or jacket cut with a loose flare from the shoulders.

Origin

Early 16th century: apparently a frequentative of the verb swag.

Pronunciation

swagger

/ˈswaɡər//ˈswæɡər/