Definition of swage in English:

swage

noun

  • 1A shaped tool or die for giving a desired form to metal by hammering or pressure.

    • ‘The bumper-to-body join lines are discreet and in line with the side rubbing strake, and the wheel arches are gently flared instead of being bounded by thick swages.’
    • ‘You can find wreaths, door swages and various other items for just about every season if you shop around a bit.’
    • ‘Even if it was the swages that caused the damage it does not take a genius to figure out the physics behind what would be most likely to cut.’
    • ‘These spring swages were carefully patterned after the shapes contained in an original Drew calking die I bought from the company many years ago.’
    • ‘At a distal end of the head support arm, there is a flat portion with a swage hole for connection of the flexure assembly.’
  • 2A groove, ridge, or other molding on an object.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Shape (metal) using a swage, especially in order to reduce its cross section.

    • ‘The hassle factor goes up exponentially when you have to swage primer pockets and keep that brass separate.’
    • ‘The ‘cut wire’ process consists of cutting off cylinders of steel wire, rounding them by swaging and grinding them to final shape between two flat rotating disks, followed by annealing and polishing.’
    • ‘Since metal is swaged around a mandrel, the blank actually gets longer during the process.’
    • ‘The company also specializes in metal fabrication of tubular components including swaging, bending, flaring, tip reducing, coiling, and laser welding.’
    • ‘Its Reduced Hazard ammunition features a core of pure Bismuth that is first cast, then swaged and finally plated with a jacket of pure copper.’
    • ‘Large rounded headlamps, swaged bonnet and indicators integrated into the front grille give the vehicle a jovial appearance, accentuated by the deep front bumper.’
    • ‘They are swaged to a uniform shape and weight, which promotes excellent accuracy.’
    1. 1.1with adverbial Join (metal pieces) together by swaging process.
      • ‘All later models have pins that are swaged into the toe piece.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in swage (sense 2 of the noun)): from Old French souage ‘decorative groove’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

swage

/sweɪdʒ//swāj/