Definition of swaddle in English:

swaddle

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Wrap (someone, especially a baby) in garments or cloth.

    ‘she swaddled the baby tightly’
    figurative ‘they have grown up swaddled in consumer technology’
    • ‘She was gone before her baby was properly swaddled, and her name was just about all Virginie knew of her.’
    • ‘Baby Wrapping for Beginners, by Andrea Sarvady, teaches how to swaddle and sling your baby in creative style.’
    • ‘In one case, Leonarde even proved a more vigilant caregiver than Huguette, when she uncovered Claude at night after Huguette had swaddled him too tightly.’
    • ‘They are tightly swaddled when in their cribs and carried by their mothers.’
    • ‘Startled into silence, I watched as it cleaned my cousin in a basin and swaddled her in a cloth before handing her to my father, the Clan's head, waiting outside.’
    • ‘Even newborn babies were not washed, and until the eighteenth century they were swaddled in bands of cloth that were changed twice a day at most.’
    • ‘I remember being swaddled in blankets, then being swathed with cold washcloths.’
    • ‘To keep Iraqi Republican Guard snipers from seeing the glow of my computer screen, I swaddled the laptop in a thick blanket and a rubber poncho.’
    • ‘I hold him and try to hug him and remember how the nurses swaddled him tightly when he was born, bound him so he would feel secure.’
    • ‘Traditionally, newborns were swaddled; today they are wrapped in warm blankets when they are very young, but swaddling is no longer practiced.’
    • ‘By my side, waiting at the next till, was a young woman, bright and bonny, holding a tiny baby in the crook of her arm, all carefully wrapped and swaddled.’
    • ‘His eyes widened as she unwrapped the sword from the black cloth she had swaddled it in.’
    • ‘Children were swaddled with various methods, depending on the region.’
    • ‘Babies are swaddled, and children are regarded as incapable of self-control until age four.’
    • ‘Infants used to be swaddled at birth and are still wrapped and bundled tightly except during bathing and diapering.’
    • ‘Most rural and low-income women breastfeed, wrap, and swaddle their babies, sometimes for as long as two years.’
    • ‘Every baby I would swaddle would end up busting out of his bundle and crying his damn little head off, limbs flailing and clawing at the air.’
    • ‘Monty returned with the baby swaddled and pinkly clean.’
    • ‘Babies are swaddled in on their backs on traditional baby boards.’
    • ‘They usually are swaddled tightly in blankets when they are very small.’
    surround, cover, enfold, enwrap, blanket, swathe, wrap, wrap up, engulf, encircle, encompass, cocoon, sheathe, encase, enclose
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: frequentative of swathe.

Pronunciation

swaddle

/ˈswɑdl//ˈswädl/