Definition of suppress in English:

suppress

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Forcibly put an end to.

    ‘the uprising was savagely suppressed’
    • ‘The Bohemian rebellion was ruthlessly suppressed in 1620 and Bohemia went through a decade of decline.’
    • ‘In fact, methods used to suppress the protests and uprisings, and witnessing staff in riot gear, caused ‘particular stress’ to children.’
    • ‘A week-long state of emergency was declared, and the protests were forcibly suppressed with considerable loss of life.’
    • ‘This sparked a series of student demonstrations that were savagely suppressed, killing over 100.’
    • ‘Internal division must be suppressed in order to achieve electoral victory.’
    • ‘Instead they are letting these kinds of groups become popular and then trying to suppress them by stamping on democracy and freedom of speech.’
    • ‘They also created a secret police force that was used to break strikes, arrest workers and suppress working class freedom and democracy.’
    • ‘The Germans did as they pleased, suppressing opponents and arresting anyone who spoke out against them.’
    • ‘These uprisings were ruthlessly suppressed, as were the Levellers in England after the Civil War.’
    • ‘Since then opposition rallies and other public events have been suppressed and their organisers arrested.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, his government brutally suppressed all opposition in gross violation of human rights.’
    • ‘Never once does he threaten to overpower or suppress them.’
    • ‘These robber barons operate in Central America, where workers' rights are savagely suppressed.’
    • ‘It seemed that everyone had either fled or already hurried down to the lower levels to suppress the uprising.’
    • ‘Between the years 1892 and 1894, the Fasci was forcibly suppressed by the government and ordered to disband.’
    • ‘The army suppressed the uprising, killing ten thousand people.’
    • ‘If they do, people will start protests, and brutal conservatives will savagely suppress them.’
    • ‘The authorities forcibly suppressed the demonstration.’
    • ‘This is a step to bind the working class, sweep aside any right won in the past with its own strength and suppress any uprising if it occurs.’
    • ‘In 1947, with French prestige at low ebb, a nationalist uprising was suppressed after several months of bitter fighting.’
    subdue, defeat, conquer, vanquish, triumph over, repress, crush, quell, quash, squash, stamp out, overpower, extinguish, put down, put out, crack down on, clamp down on, cow, drive underground
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    1. 1.1 Prevent the development, action, or expression of (a feeling, impulse, idea, etc.); restrain.
      ‘she could not suppress a rising panic’
      • ‘Aimée was immediately suspicious but suppressed the feeling.’
      • ‘Dani bit her lip, trying to suppress her feelings of desire.’
      • ‘During the first, some were asked to express feelings of anger and others were asked to suppress those feelings.’
      • ‘Deanna tried to suppress what looked like a smirk at this point.’
      • ‘Nicholas smiled and tried to suppress his feeling of joy.’
      • ‘Initiative on the part of individual soldiers was suppressed in favour of unquestioning compliance with instructions.’
      • ‘In other words, nightmares occur when dreams fail to blunt the body's emotional response, whereas successful dreaming controls and suppresses the feeling in dreams and protects the continuity of sleep.’
      • ‘What would you suggest I do to suppress these unwanted feelings without the use of pills or alcohol?’
      • ‘Twitching, I barely suppressed the urge to scowl.’
      • ‘When fear is high, morality and reason are suppressed in favour of survival.’
      • ‘People who suffer emotional distress can turn to food to suppress their feelings, only exacerbating the problem.’
      • ‘In that way they hoped to suppress what they thought were his poisonous ideas.’
      • ‘I fear that she is suppressing her feelings and that she'll experience some sort of backlash in time to come.’
      • ‘For three years, she had tried to subdue and suppress the aching questions and pleas of her heart and soul.’
      • ‘There was a small ounce of jealousy that erupted in the pit of her stomach before she forcibly suppressed it.’
      • ‘This book is here to try and help you figure out ways to suppress the feelings of depression following someone's death.’
      • ‘He couldn't suppress a shudder and curled up like a cat on the floor.’
      • ‘So is it healthier to express or suppress your feelings?’
      • ‘Whether anger is triggered by external events such as traffic jams, or by internal worrying, researchers are still unsure if it's healthier to express or suppress the emotion.’
      • ‘I'm a very ordinary human and can't suppress my feelings of love however hard I try.’
      conceal, restrain, stifle, smother, bottle up, keep a rein on, hold back, keep back, fight back, choke back, control, keep under control, check, keep in check, curb, contain, bridle, inhibit, put a lid on, deaden, muffle
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    2. 1.2 Prevent the dissemination of (information)
      ‘the report had been suppressed’
      • ‘The central planning model - one case, one court, one set of rules, one settlement price for all involved - suppresses information that is vital to accurate resolution.’
      • ‘The freedom of the press is preventing government from suppressing the news further.’
      • ‘For example, lead pigment manufacturers were knowledgeable about the hazards of lead, and suppressed the information, just as asbestos manufacturers did.’
      • ‘The Pakistani authorities have reportedly suppressed this information and not shared it with the US.’
      • ‘Instead of promoting justice in the case, his reaction, along with a group of newspaper editors, has been to suppress information about the case.’
      • ‘The government, however, suppressed the information.’
      • ‘You've ceased to try to deal with the issues, and moved into attempts to suppress information to prevent others from even being exposed to the issues.’
      • ‘Regulators suppressed the negative information on the grounds that it might scare families and physicians away from the drugs, according to testimony by drug company executives.’
      • ‘Until the beginning of this year AIDS was merely ignored or information was actively suppressed.’
      • ‘Until last month, the federal statistics department, responding to pressure from Inuit organizations, took unusual steps to suppress their own information.’
      • ‘Later on, this information was suppressed or ignored.’
      • ‘The police suppressed information about the ritual aspect, to spare the children the publicity.’
      • ‘She continues to suppress information about the first trial to this day.’
      • ‘Of course, they look for information that they want to hear and they try to disprove or suppress information they don't want to hear.’
      • ‘They've also managed to suppress information about much of their activities.’
      • ‘The networks could fight the politicians on First Amendment principles, arguing that it's insane to suppress newsworthy information.’
      • ‘The Minister is not suppressing the information.’
      • ‘With few exceptions, the mass media suppresses all information about the entire topic.’
      • ‘I myself am not aware of how it happened - for unknown reasons, this information was suppressed before it was allowed into the open.’
      • ‘Well, when we have what is quite clearly an alliance between the government and the press, and information is wilfully suppressed, then we are no better off than a country under a dictatorship.’
      censor, redact, keep secret, conceal, hide, keep hidden, hush up, gag, keep silent about, withhold, cover up, smother, stifle, muzzle, ban, not disclose, not breathe a word of
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    3. 1.3 Prevent or inhibit (a process or reaction)
      ‘use of the drug suppressed the immune response’
      • ‘To suppress the effects of iron and manganese, 5 ml of triethanolamine were added.’
      • ‘The radiation treatment destroys the tumor cells and suppresses the function of the stem cells in preparation for the transplant.’
      • ‘Oral contraceptives are sometimes used for 1-2 months to suppress ovarian function and prevent further cyst formation.’
      • ‘Insulin resistance affects the disposal of glucose in muscle tissue and suppresses the output of hepatic glucose.’
      • ‘Your drug regimen will include immunosuppressants - drugs that suppress the activity of your immune system.’
      • ‘By using drugs to suppress the function of the ovaries, researchers think the ovaries could be temporarily shut down during cancer treatment.’
      • ‘This is a particular concern because you are on immunosuppressant drugs, which suppress your immune system's ability to fight normal infections.’
      • ‘Wiping with a moist cloth removes over 90 percent of the allergen, and keeping the relative humidity in the house below 50 percent greatly suppresses the growth of dust mites.’
      • ‘Their research is bringing to light a potentially new class of genes that can suppress the growth of tumors.’
      • ‘If the arrest is dependent upon recombination, then preventing recombination should suppress the meiotic progression defect.’
      • ‘Some medications can suppress allergic reactions so that the skin testing can't be performed.’
      • ‘Current therapies for interstitial lung diseases, which commonly end up causing lung fibrosis, aim only at suppressing the inflammatory process.’
      • ‘In contrast, PKC inhibition did not suppress the growth of normal mast cells.’
      • ‘It was thought that polymorphism between tandemly repeated genes suppresses recombination, thereby preventing sequence homogenization of the gene family.’
      • ‘Chemotherapy treatments suppress the making of various blood cells.’
      • ‘The authors conclude that adrenal function is commonly suppressed immediately following conventional short-term therapy with glucocorticoids.’
      • ‘Currently, people with severe uveitis must take steroids or other drugs that suppress the immune system to control the inflammation.’
      • ‘Endogenous antimicrobial peptides can suppress bacterial growth for 3 to 6 hours.’
      • ‘This includes people with cancer, with organ transplants, or undergoing radiation therapy or treatment with drugs that suppress the immune system.’
      • ‘Most patients who have a less than perfectly matched donor will receive anti-thymocyte globulin, which is a medicine that suppresses the graft-versus-host reaction.’
    4. 1.4 Partly or wholly eliminate (electrical interference)
      • ‘Crosstalk from synchronizing signals is suppressed by filters.’
      • ‘The narrowband interference is then suppressed in the signal combiner prior to application to the standard cross correlation process.’
      • ‘The negative feedback circuit suppresses variations in gate voltage of the output MOS transistor by the feedback loop.’
      • ‘Due to such a constitution, the generation of the interference light can be suppressed.’
      • ‘Spark plug wires that suppress electro-magnetic interference are a necessity in our electronics-rich race cars, but these wires can degrade over time.’
    5. 1.5Psychoanalysis Consciously inhibit (an unpleasant idea or memory) to avoid considering it.
      • ‘She turned away from the window, suppressing the oh-so-clear memory of the fearful apparition, and walked slowly down the gallery.’
      • ‘She stepped into the scalding water of the tub and sank down into her array of bubbles, suppressing the memories of the accident and focusing all her energy on how she was going to convince Melanie she didn't want to try out for the dance team.’
      • ‘After his memories were suppressed, he was allowed free access into his subconscious.’
      • ‘As he told me the story, he kept on losing track of where he was, as if he has been suppressing these memories for so long that his brain just automatically derails any consideration of what happened.’
      • ‘In addition, the researchers found that the more subjects activated their frontal cortex during the experiment, the better they were at suppressing unwanted memories.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin suppress- ‘pressed down’, from the verb supprimere, from sub- ‘down’ + premere ‘to press’.

Pronunciation

suppress

/səˈpres//səˈprɛs/