Definition of sundial in English:

sundial

noun

  • 1An instrument showing the time by the shadow of a pointer cast by the sun onto a plate marked with the hours of the day.

    • ‘While hard landscaping, water features, sundials, statuary and the like will constitute fixtures and fittings, free standing furniture can be taken with you when you move.’
    • ‘A simple, sparse arena populated by a sundial and small bench gives the actors freedom to explore the text's complexities.’
    • ‘In the center of the parking lot was a towering white building, casting a shadow like a gargantuan sundial.’
    • ‘Originally a mechanical engineer, he developed his interest in sundials nine years ago and has made more than 2 000 dials.’
    • ‘She laughed, then looked at the grey sundial that sat outside her window.’
    • ‘Stonework and plasterwork have been lovingly repaired, and a traditional sundial remade.’
    • ‘The oval pocket sundial is made of gilded brass, and measures 4.8 centimetres across the major axis.’
    • ‘Multiple sundials were situated in strategic locations along the terraces, capturing the sun's light as it made its daily path across the sky.’
    • ‘In addition to gravestones, Hummelstown stone was fashioned into pedestals for urns, sundials, clocks, and door stops.’
    • ‘Time can be measured exactly by clocks and sundials, but human beings can rarely measure time accurately, for the feeling of the passage of time varies in each human being, and even then is not constant but varies with moods and events.’
    • ‘Early tools, such as the sundial, began to create objective standardization but still lacked precision.’
    • ‘We kidded some of the slower contestants about timing them with a sundial or a calendar, but they took our joking in stride.’
    • ‘In the center of the monument, a sundial would be erected.’
    • ‘In the inner courtyard an attractive sundial catches the eye of the visitor.’
    • ‘I looked over at the sundial and saw it was late morning.’
    • ‘The upper shelf contains a celestial globe, and several extremely specialized scientific instruments: quadrants, sundials, and a torquetum (a timepiece and navigational aid).’
    • ‘But once his eyes adjusted, he could see an area of shade, matching the arm of a sundial.’
    • ‘In the bright desert sunlight, the whole place acts as a giant internalized sundial, with light slowly moving over the polished concrete floors and the wonderfully richly textured earth walls.’
    • ‘She thrust a taut finger to the sundial in the center of the courtyard.’
    • ‘Its massive sundials and other structures are a geometry of red sandstone inlaid with dazzling white marble, more like works of modern art than scientific instruments.’
  • 2A mollusk with a flattened spiral shell that is typically patterned in shades of brown, living in tropical and subtropical seas.

Pronunciation:

sundial

/ˈsənˌdī(ə)l/